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biochemistry

wierdman
Posts: 721
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7/25/2011 7:12:07 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
if humans and ape are closely related, then can we not biochemically activate genes that may give it some human qualities but still retain its ape like feature. This could create a breed that is in between the ape world and the human world.
Pozzo
Posts: 139
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7/25/2011 8:15:08 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/25/2011 7:12:07 AM, wierdman wrote:
if humans and ape are closely related, then can we not biochemically activate genes that may give it some human qualities but still retain its ape like feature. This could create a breed that is in between the ape world and the human world.

I think I know what you mean. If we could isolate a gene for intelligence or less-hairyness or whatever in apes, then theoretically, I suppose we could activate that, or keep it "turned on" for longer than it would otherwise be in the ape's development. I'm not an expert though. I wouldn't go so far as to call it a breed between human and ape. I'd just call it a clever/less hairy ape. Call me speciesist.
wierdman
Posts: 721
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7/25/2011 8:20:08 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/25/2011 8:15:08 AM, Pozzo wrote:
At 7/25/2011 7:12:07 AM, wierdman wrote:
if humans and ape are closely related, then can we not biochemically activate genes that may give it some human qualities but still retain its ape like feature. This could create a breed that is in between the ape world and the human world.

I think I know what you mean. If we could isolate a gene for intelligence or less-hairyness or whatever in apes, then theoretically, I suppose we could activate that, or keep it "turned on" for longer than it would otherwise be in the ape's development. I'm not an expert though. I wouldn't go so far as to call it a breed between human and ape. I'd just call it a clever/less hairy ape. Call me speciesist.

clever
Pozzo
Posts: 139
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7/25/2011 8:48:23 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/25/2011 8:21:33 AM, Thaddeus wrote:
Genes don't work like that.

I read something to the contrary. I'm not a biologist though. I'd appreciate a brief explanation of the reality.
Thaddeus
Posts: 6,985
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7/25/2011 9:14:59 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/25/2011 8:36:15 AM, wierdman wrote:
At 7/25/2011 8:21:33 AM, Thaddeus wrote:
Genes don't work like that.

how do they work?

You want a full explanation? I lack the inclination. If you want a brief explanation; I lack the capacity. Fairly basic information to correct you can be found on wikipedia though;
http://en.wikipedia.org...
http://en.wikipedia.org...
http://en.wikipedia.org...
wierdman
Posts: 721
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7/25/2011 9:33:32 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/25/2011 9:14:59 AM, Thaddeus wrote:
At 7/25/2011 8:36:15 AM, wierdman wrote:
At 7/25/2011 8:21:33 AM, Thaddeus wrote:
Genes don't work like that.

how do they work?

You want a full explanation? I lack the inclination. If you want a brief explanation; I lack the capacity. Fairly basic information to correct you can be found on wikipedia though;
http://en.wikipedia.org...
http://en.wikipedia.org...
http://en.wikipedia.org...

This might be true; however scientist have been able to mutate animals be activating specific genes before transcription.
Pozzo
Posts: 139
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7/25/2011 9:54:52 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/25/2011 9:14:59 AM, Thaddeus wrote:
At 7/25/2011 8:36:15 AM, wierdman wrote:
At 7/25/2011 8:21:33 AM, Thaddeus wrote:
Genes don't work like that.

how do they work?

You want a full explanation? I lack the inclination. If you want a brief explanation; I lack the capacity. Fairly basic information to correct you can be found on wikipedia though;
http://en.wikipedia.org...
http://en.wikipedia.org...
http://en.wikipedia.org...

No, I just wanted a clarification of what exactly you object to and perhaps two sentences explaining the reality.
http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov...
http://www.scientificamerican.com...
http://www.sciencedaily.com...
http://www.wired.com...
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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7/27/2011 6:09:52 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
It's extremely unlikely that there is single gene for intelligence. Among the many factors are brain size, brain organization, neural network configuration, individual capacities for memory and reasoning in different subject areas, ability to build new pathways to learn, and so forth. Mostly likely tens of thousands of genes are involved. Moreover the genes would not be there to be activated, they would be missing altogether.

With gene replacement techniques, it might be possible to enhance certain areas, like improving memory. There are people who naturally remember what happened to them every day of their lives. Ask what wa sin the newspaper on a certain day 25 years ago and they will tell you. There is no point in enhancing apes, when humans have a greater need. It would amount to human guiding of human evolution.
SuperRobotWars
Posts: 3,906
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7/27/2011 6:24:55 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/27/2011 6:09:52 PM, RoyLatham wrote:
It's extremely unlikely that there is single gene for intelligence. Among the many factors are brain size, brain organization, neural network configuration, individual capacities for memory and reasoning in different subject areas, ability to build new pathways to learn, and so forth. Mostly likely tens of thousands of genes are involved. Moreover the genes would not be there to be activated, they would be missing altogether.

With gene replacement techniques, it might be possible to enhance certain areas, like improving memory. There are people who naturally remember what happened to them every day of their lives. Ask what wa sin the newspaper on a certain day 25 years ago and they will tell you. There is no point in enhancing apes, when humans have a greater need. It would amount to human guiding of human evolution.

Genetic modification of humans to improve the species, I like it [especially considering how this could be used to make massive profits off of those who would like to have certain "extra" physical features and abilities]. But I do believe we should genetically engineer other organisms to become more like humans in using their intellect to create technology and societies. We could build an seed ship [which would carry them in an embryo state along with several other species they would need to survive on in the world they would eventually go to conquer] alongside several other vessels that would be necessary to terraform the world in question, given time they will develop and become like us [if they do not go extinct first] and hopefully by the time this specie reaches the enlightenment/industrial age we can come and visit.
Minister Of Trolling
: At 12/6/2011 2:21:41 PM, badger wrote:
: ugly people should beat beautiful people ugly. simple! you'd be killing two birds with the one stone... women like violent men and you're making yourself more attractive, relatively. i met a blonde dude who was prettier than me not so long ago. he's not so pretty now! ha!
:
: ...and well, he wasn't really prettier than me. he just had nice hair.
CosmicAlfonzo
Posts: 5,955
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7/27/2011 6:29:37 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Humans and gorillas don't actually exist.
Official "High Priest of Secular Affairs and Transient Distributor of Sonic Apple Seeds relating to the Reptilian Division of Paperwork Immoliation" of The FREEDO Bureaucracy, a DDO branch of the Erisian Front, a subdivision of the Discordian Back, a Limb of the Illuminatian Cosmic Utensil Corp