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Backwards Progress

Tiel
Posts: 1,500
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9/16/2011 4:25:30 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 9/16/2011 8:17:44 AM, Lasagna wrote:
Willie Nelson gets it... why don't you?

http://www.youtube.com...

I do. Great video. We do seem to be making backward progress. The modern practice of concepts towards how humans should live with nature and the earth is unhealthy and destructive. I hope to see a revolution of change in my lifetime.
"Only the inner force of curiosity and wonder about the unknown, or an outer force upon your free will, can brake the shackles of your current perception."
innomen
Posts: 10,052
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9/16/2011 4:59:45 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 9/16/2011 8:17:44 AM, Lasagna wrote:
Willie Nelson gets it... why don't you?

http://www.youtube.com...

Rob, you know that organic food is hard on resources, and is less helpful in dealing with poverty, 3rd world countries, than conventional foods?
Lasagna
Posts: 2,440
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9/16/2011 6:08:06 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 9/16/2011 4:59:45 PM, innomen wrote:
At 9/16/2011 8:17:44 AM, Lasagna wrote:
Willie Nelson gets it... why don't you?

http://www.youtube.com...

Rob, you know that organic food is hard on resources, and is less helpful in dealing with poverty, 3rd world countries, than conventional foods?

I don't subscribe to "organics" because I think it is a ridiculous term. As opposed to what? Inorganic? To label food that is grown naturally with special terminology is nonsensical.

I'm going to check the literature on what you said, Innomen, because if there is data to support that then perhaps that would be a good thesis idea for me next semester. The type of farming I support is the kind done in poorer countries, which doesn't employ monocultures and instead uses mixed species. This largely eliminates the need for pesticides and fertilizers. It is hard on human resources, however, but since one out of ten people in this country don't work anyway, I don't see how that would be a problem. As far as being able to produce enough food, well, we simply incent more gardening. Is there any practical limit to how many gardens can be made in the U.S.? We could balance the incentives off with how much we have to divvy out for welfare, unemployment, food stamps, etc. since we'll have more food. If I can somehow create a workable methodology to make this into a thesis I will owe you a drink, Innomen.
Rob