Total Posts:7|Showing Posts:1-7
Jump to topic:

Interesting Studies Reinforces Two Ideas

FREEDO
Posts: 21,057
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
9/14/2012 3:44:37 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
http://www.alternet.org...

This article and the studies it mentions concern the the connection between novel experiences and novel ideas. As this, and other research I've observed, suggests, abnormal experience promotes creative thinking. This reinforces two other subjects I had been thinking about recently. I just happened to run into this article so I figured I'd mention it.

1. Inspiration From Psychedelic Drugs

As the article rightly takes mention of, the key here is changing one's pattern of thought. We like to think of ourselves as free thinking but really the entire perception of "free" can be summed up in the extent to which our thoughts are "complex". Despite the mental elaboratencies of even the most philosophically inclined among us, we often fail to grasp just how ingrained we are in a certain mode of thought. Some may hold on with all their might to the idea that the mode of thought they are ingrained in is simply that of reason. But I would contest that a mind is never truly rational until it is open to all the options, not simply a concerning of what it does with them. And a key part to actually understanding and discovering those options is creativity, which, by definition, if really the ability to change your thought pattern. Which I may go as far to say is in fact the definition of intelligence.

Psychedelic drugs are truly, by their very nature, the most purely efficient tool for achieving this task. Call it chemognosis. Afterall, it is only by our assortment of chemicals in our brains that we understand anything in the way we understand them. Change the chemicals and change your understanding. Only people who have actually had psychedelic experiences can truly appreciate the meaning of this sentiment. Such experiences have always given people a sort of wisdom they never grasped before. A wisdom about their very minds. An easier time embracing the idea that the way we perceive the world has nothing to do with what the world is actually like. And above all, a complete change in thought pattern that induces massive creativity.

5. The Psychology of Randomness

Through my research and experimentation with philosophies and cultures of things like Discordianism and Surrealism, it seemed to always strike out to me that the more random of people were also the more creative of people. The two are often completely confused with one another. Surrealism is almost completely understood in pop culture as simply embracing randomness, even though it has nothing inherently to do with randomness. It seems as though randomness just happens when you have the sort of thought pattern that would gravitate towards such a philosophy. So I've been thinking about the reasons for such a correlation. And it appears to me that both randomness and creativity are caused and also responsible for different mutual mental processes. The article brings a lot of clarification into this by mentioning the importance of changing thought patterns when inducing creativity. To suddenly do something which doesn't follow... it creates a change in thought pattern... or perhaps, either in reversal or congruence of the former, is caused by a change in thought pattern. It certainly takes creativity to pull something out of thin air which appears random. I really have to sit back for a second and be in awe of it. The simple fact that we can create something which appears random is an example of the human brain producing a pattern too complex for itself to solve. That's quite an interesting thing. We must resort to pulling something out of our mind which lies below our conscious, which is indeed the very point of Surrealism in an effort to communicate pure ideas. It is also a key part in the method of Discordianism which employs the use of humor as it's basic philosophy, as humor, in essence, in the recognition of an unexpected pattern.

There are countless other ways this can be applied or how it can tie into other interesting discussions about philosophy or psychology(which I would actually say are the same thing), but I was just giving the two that came to my mind.
GRAND POOBAH OF DDO

fnord
MouthWash
Posts: 2,607
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
9/14/2012 9:57:53 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/14/2012 3:44:37 AM, FREEDO wrote:
http://www.alternet.org...

This article and the studies it mentions concern the the connection between novel experiences and novel ideas. As this, and other research I've observed, suggests, abnormal experience promotes creative thinking. This reinforces two other subjects I had been thinking about recently. I just happened to run into this article so I figured I'd mention it.

1. Inspiration From Psychedelic Drugs

As the article rightly takes mention of, the key here is changing one's pattern of thought. We like to think of ourselves as free thinking but really the entire perception of "free" can be summed up in the extent to which our thoughts are "complex". Despite the mental elaboratencies of even the most philosophically inclined among us, we often fail to grasp just how ingrained we are in a certain mode of thought. Some may hold on with all their might to the idea that the mode of thought they are ingrained in is simply that of reason. But I would contest that a mind is never truly rational until it is open to all the options, not simply a concerning of what it does with them. And a key part to actually understanding and discovering those options is creativity, which, by definition, if really the ability to change your thought pattern. Which I may go as far to say is in fact the definition of intelligence.

Psychedelic drugs are truly, by their very nature, the most purely efficient tool for achieving this task. Call it chemognosis. Afterall, it is only by our assortment of chemicals in our brains that we understand anything in the way we understand them. Change the chemicals and change your understanding. Only people who have actually had psychedelic experiences can truly appreciate the meaning of this sentiment. Such experiences have always given people a sort of wisdom they never grasped before. A wisdom about their very minds. An easier time embracing the idea that the way we perceive the world has nothing to do with what the world is actually like. And above all, a complete change in thought pattern that induces massive creativity.

5. The Psychology of Randomness

Through my research and experimentation with philosophies and cultures of things like Discordianism and Surrealism, it seemed to always strike out to me that the more random of people were also the more creative of people. The two are often completely confused with one another. Surrealism is almost completely understood in pop culture as simply embracing randomness, even though it has nothing inherently to do with randomness. It seems as though randomness just happens when you have the sort of thought pattern that would gravitate towards such a philosophy. So I've been thinking about the reasons for such a correlation. And it appears to me that both randomness and creativity are caused and also responsible for different mutual mental processes. The article brings a lot of clarification into this by mentioning the importance of changing thought patterns when inducing creativity. To suddenly do something which doesn't follow... it creates a change in thought pattern... or perhaps, either in reversal or congruence of the former, is caused by a change in thought pattern. It certainly takes creativity to pull something out of thin air which appears random. I really have to sit back for a second and be in awe of it. The simple fact that we can create something which appears random is an example of the human brain producing a pattern too complex for itself to solve. That's quite an interesting thing. We must resort to pulling something out of our mind which lies below our conscious, which is indeed the very point of Surrealism in an effort to communicate pure ideas. It is also a key part in the method of Discordianism which employs the use of humor as it's basic philosophy, as humor, in essence, in the recognition of an unexpected pattern.

There are countless other ways this can be applied or how it can tie into other interesting discussions about philosophy or psychology(which I would actually say are the same thing), but I was just giving the two that came to my mind.

Isn't that quite obvious? We aren't computers.
"Well, that gives whole new meaning to my assassination. If I was going to die anyway, perhaps I should leave the Bolsheviks' descendants some Christmas cookies instead of breaking their dishes and vodka bottles in their sleep." -Tsar Nicholas II (YYW)
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
9/14/2012 11:08:32 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
California is full of 1960s druggies with obvious brain damage. Among the symptoms are a short attention span. A think a variety of experience is important, but thee are plenty of opportunities for a great variety real experience.
slo1
Posts: 4,361
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
9/14/2012 4:45:51 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/14/2012 3:44:37 AM, FREEDO wrote:
http://www.alternet.org...

This article and the studies it mentions concern the the connection between novel experiences and novel ideas. As this, and other research I've observed, suggests, abnormal experience promotes creative thinking. This reinforces two other subjects I had been thinking about recently. I just happened to run into this article so I figured I'd mention it.

1. Inspiration From Psychedelic Drugs

As the article rightly takes mention of, the key here is changing one's pattern of thought. We like to think of ourselves as free thinking but really the entire perception of "free" can be summed up in the extent to which our thoughts are "complex". Despite the mental elaboratencies of even the most philosophically inclined among us, we often fail to grasp just how ingrained we are in a certain mode of thought. Some may hold on with all their might to the idea that the mode of thought they are ingrained in is simply that of reason. But I would contest that a mind is never truly rational until it is open to all the options, not simply a concerning of what it does with them. And a key part to actually understanding and discovering those options is creativity, which, by definition, if really the ability to change your thought pattern. Which I may go as far to say is in fact the definition of intelligence.

Psychedelic drugs are truly, by their very nature, the most purely efficient tool for achieving this task. Call it chemognosis. Afterall, it is only by our assortment of chemicals in our brains that we understand anything in the way we understand them. Change the chemicals and change your understanding. Only people who have actually had psychedelic experiences can truly appreciate the meaning of this sentiment. Such experiences have always given people a sort of wisdom they never grasped before. A wisdom about their very minds. An easier time embracing the idea that the way we perceive the world has nothing to do with what the world is actually like. And above all, a complete change in thought pattern that induces massive creativity.

5. The Psychology of Randomness

Through my research and experimentation with philosophies and cultures of things like Discordianism and Surrealism, it seemed to always strike out to me that the more random of people were also the more creative of people. The two are often completely confused with one another. Surrealism is almost completely understood in pop culture as simply embracing randomness, even though it has nothing inherently to do with randomness. It seems as though randomness just happens when you have the sort of thought pattern that would gravitate towards such a philosophy. So I've been thinking about the reasons for such a correlation. And it appears to me that both randomness and creativity are caused and also responsible for different mutual mental processes. The article brings a lot of clarification into this by mentioning the importance of changing thought patterns when inducing creativity. To suddenly do something which doesn't follow... it creates a change in thought pattern... or perhaps, either in reversal or congruence of the former, is caused by a change in thought pattern. It certainly takes creativity to pull something out of thin air which appears random. I really have to sit back for a second and be in awe of it. The simple fact that we can create something which appears random is an example of the human brain producing a pattern too complex for itself to solve. That's quite an interesting thing. We must resort to pulling something out of our mind which lies below our conscious, which is indeed the very point of Surrealism in an effort to communicate pure ideas. It is also a key part in the method of Discordianism which employs the use of humor as it's basic philosophy, as humor, in essence, in the recognition of an unexpected pattern.

There are countless other ways this can be applied or how it can tie into other interesting discussions about philosophy or psychology(which I would actually say are the same thing), but I was just giving the two that came to my mind.

I would tend to agree, although one must not overuse the psychedelic drugs so much that it alters brain chemistry and connectivity that it starts to cause various neurosis. No need to be the guy who trips on acid every other day and then gets to a point where he looses all interest in eating and hygiene.

I would also add that there is probably a tie in to an openness to not be tied to normal social convention. Watching a vid of someone may just release the self from an unconscious constriction of perceived social repercussions. That in turn may make the mind more creative by diminished the role of social judgement.

It would be interesting to set up an experience where one is instructed to break a social norm, rate their anxiety level about breaking it, and then take the creativity test.

As an example, I might have someone stand on a street corner and shout something outrageous for a min. I suspect one might be more creative after that. In other words does eccentricity promote creativity simply because it turns off an unconscious restrictions that seem to limit us so we stay within social norms?
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
9/16/2012 1:12:52 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Until I shoot you in the leg can you say that you know what pain is? Fvck yeah you can.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
Zaradi
Posts: 14,126
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
9/16/2012 1:30:04 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/16/2012 1:12:52 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Until I shoot you in the leg can you say that you know what pain is? Fvck yeah you can.

It depends on the kind of pain that you are talking about. Arguably, pain is all a mental delusion that feeds our body with neurological stimuli so that we can adequately react to society and the environment around us. The only problem is that our minds operate under a fog of ignorance that prevents us from really knowing what the result of our actions will be until we arrive at the result. I can speculate upon the numerous possible endings of me trying to run across a busy highway, but I can never be sure that I will get hit by a car until I actually get hit by a car. Likewise, we can speculate as to what pain is, but we can never really know what pain is until we are shot in the leg (or, more generally, experience pain).
Want to debate? Pick a topic and hit me up! - http://www.debate.org...
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
9/16/2012 2:56:49 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 9/16/2012 1:30:04 AM, Zaradi wrote:
At 9/16/2012 1:12:52 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Until I shoot you in the leg can you say that you know what pain is? Fvck yeah you can.

It depends on the kind of pain that you are talking about. Arguably, pain is all a mental delusion that feeds our body with neurological stimuli so that we can adequately react to society and the environment around us. The only problem is that our minds operate under a fog of ignorance that prevents us from really knowing what the result of our actions will be until we arrive at the result. I can speculate upon the numerous possible endings of me trying to run across a busy highway, but I can never be sure that I will get hit by a car until I actually get hit by a car. Likewise, we can speculate as to what pain is, but we can never really know what pain is until we are shot in the leg (or, more generally, experience pain).
That was my point. You don't need psychedelics to experience these things.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush