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Stem cell researchers wins nobel prize.

popculturepooka
Posts: 7,924
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10/10/2012 6:33:00 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
http://www.usatoday.com...
http://blog.heritage.org...
http://www.nytimes.com...

The interesting part of this (ignoring the medical breakthrough) is the ethical concerns motivating the research.

For instance:

"When I saw the embryo, I suddenly realized there was such a small difference between it and my daughters," said Dr. Yamanaka, 45, a father of two and now a professor at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences at Kyoto University. "I thought, we can"t keep destroying embryos for our research. There must be another way."

and

"Yamanaka deserves extra credit for overcoming fierce objections to the creation of embryos for research, reviving the field, said Julian Savulescu, director of Oxford University's Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics.

Yamanaka has taken people's ethical concerns seriously about embryo research and modified the trajectory of research into a path that is acceptable for all," Savulescu said. "He deserves not only a Nobel Prize for Medicine, but a Nobel Prize for Ethics."

Pretty cool.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!
jharry
Posts: 4,984
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10/10/2012 7:08:50 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/10/2012 6:33:00 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
http://www.usatoday.com...
http://blog.heritage.org...
http://www.nytimes.com...

The interesting part of this (ignoring the medical breakthrough) is the ethical concerns motivating the research.

For instance:

"When I saw the embryo, I suddenly realized there was such a small difference between it and my daughters," said Dr. Yamanaka, 45, a father of two and now a professor at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences at Kyoto University. "I thought, we can"t keep destroying embryos for our research. There must be another way."

and

"Yamanaka deserves extra credit for overcoming fierce objections to the creation of embryos for research, reviving the field, said Julian Savulescu, director of Oxford University's Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics.

Yamanaka has taken people's ethical concerns seriously about embryo research and modified the trajectory of research into a path that is acceptable for all," Savulescu said. "He deserves not only a Nobel Prize for Medicine, but a Nobel Prize for Ethics."

Pretty cool.

Very cool. I appreciate science and all those that practice in a way that respects himan dignity.

I also like the quote about the embryo being like his daughter. Every single human alive today started out just like that.

Are they making any progress with stem cell research?
In nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti. Amen
royalpaladin
Posts: 22,357
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10/10/2012 8:07:15 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
We've covered this extensively in my Developmental Biology class. There are a few problems, namely that when the cells were injected into mice, they sometimes caused cancer and sometimes were also rejected by their immune systems. They are currently working on reducing those flaws, however.
ObiWan
Posts: 732
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10/10/2012 8:08:25 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
It's good that he is taking an ethical approach as well as a scientific one. Stem Cell research is a field that promises (and already is) providing great advances in medicine. But while you can't argue that the advantages are great, it's always been a controversial field because of the ethics involved so it's fantastic to have people committed to making it work out for everyone.
These are not the droids you're looking for.
popculturepooka
Posts: 7,924
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10/10/2012 9:20:26 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/10/2012 8:07:15 PM, royalpaladin wrote:
We've covered this extensively in my Developmental Biology class. There are a few problems, namely that when the cells were injected into mice, they sometimes caused cancer and sometimes were also rejected by their immune systems. They are currently working on reducing those flaws, however.

Do you have any links or anything you can share? That sounds interesting.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!
royalpaladin
Posts: 22,357
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10/11/2012 6:30:21 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 10/10/2012 9:20:26 PM, popculturepooka wrote:
At 10/10/2012 8:07:15 PM, royalpaladin wrote:
We've covered this extensively in my Developmental Biology class. There are a few problems, namely that when the cells were injected into mice, they sometimes caused cancer and sometimes were also rejected by their immune systems. They are currently working on reducing those flaws, however.

Do you have any links or anything you can share? That sounds interesting.

I'll try to find some articles. We went over most of the information in class.