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Do you think cement will set in space.

suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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3/14/2013 9:20:05 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Just randomly ask.

I think it will set but not because of the hydration but because the water in cement is frozen solid (I read some where that the astronaut urine will be injected out in to the space and crystallized) would you agree?
drafterman
Posts: 18,870
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3/14/2013 10:00:55 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Probably not for the reason you mention. The water would crystalize then sublimate into water vapor when exposed to the sun. Water is crucial for the proper setting of concret. Also, the lack of gravity is an issue too; special types of concrete mix and procedures are necessary.
suttichart.denpruektham
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3/14/2013 11:13:19 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I guess they will have to build a mold of the structure they like to build, fill it wit oxygen, and the air tight it, the concrete can then be injected with pressure.

I think the lack of gravity should actually improve the workability (more liquid, watery) of concrete. If the cement used is some hyper-heat type (like alumina cement) it should be able to set in low temperature (like concrete used in snow).

But then again, I might just build my house with plastic board to avoid all the trouble :D
Andromeda_Z
Posts: 4,151
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3/16/2013 2:13:58 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/14/2013 9:20:05 AM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
I read some where that the astronaut urine will be injected out in to the space and crystallized

Where was that? I'm curious about the reasons and benefits for it. It seems that, on the face of it, that would lead to a detrimental loss of water for use by the astronauts. Why not simply purify it?
malcolmxy
Posts: 2,855
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3/16/2013 3:27:36 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
That is one of the most awesome hypothetical questions I've ever heard anyone ask. You actually can't just google it and get an immediate answer.

I think that if you heated the dry mix, added calcium chloride, used near boiling hot water and placed the mix in some sort of insulated wrap (not necessarily air tight, such that it would still be exposed to the harsh conditions of a vacuum), yes. Otherwise, no. (or, prob'ly not, anyway)

http://www.harmonconcrete.com...

(I knew none of this until just now, so thanks for even asking the question.)
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suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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3/16/2013 4:11:17 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/16/2013 3:27:36 AM, malcolmxy wrote:
That is one of the most awesome hypothetical questions I've ever heard anyone ask. You actually can't just google it and get an immediate answer.

I think that if you heated the dry mix, added calcium chloride, used near boiling hot water and placed the mix in some sort of insulated wrap (not necessarily air tight, such that it would still be exposed to the harsh conditions of a vacuum), yes. Otherwise, no. (or, prob'ly not, anyway)

http://www.harmonconcrete.com...

(I knew none of this until just now, so thanks for even asking the question.)

Appreciated, I have been working in the cement manufacturer so sometime I just feel like curious about this.

However, if you use calcium chloride to the concrete, you should make sure not to include rebar in such structure. Salt is very corrosive, it could break your column in to two if it is exposed constantly.

Also I am not very sure that the water is crystallized in space because of the low temperature (don't know if the fact that there is no oxygen has anything to do with it ).