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Can music affect our intelligence?

pozessed
Posts: 1,034
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4/17/2013 10:11:55 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I'm just curious of what people think.

I believe that music we decide to listen to can make us more or less intelligent. Not only due to lyrical content but the frequencies and vibrations used s well.
phantom
Posts: 6,774
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4/17/2013 10:15:02 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
According to a nueroscience book I was reading a while ago, those who listen to classical and more complex forms of music, tend to be intelligent. It's not just a correlation though. Complex music, affects ones intelligence, according to the book. I'd try to find it now since I'm at the library, but I have to go to work soon.
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
slo1
Posts: 4,359
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4/17/2013 10:29:30 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 4/17/2013 10:11:55 AM, pozessed wrote:
I'm just curious of what people think.

I believe that music we decide to listen to can make us more or less intelligent. Not only due to lyrical content but the frequencies and vibrations used s well.

Binaural beats = hokus pokus.

The GA governor who gave away Mozart CD's to new mothers and Florida law to play hour of classical music at day care = waste of tax payer monies.

I have never seen credible evidence that music can alter cognitive functioning involved in intelligence.

I do believe there is social conditioning that is involved with the music a person experiences thus likes.(see my post in the Science section that addresses a new study showing that people like new music when they can predict it (unconsciously).

The end result of social conditioning is that more well educated people are going to listen and enjoy classical music than lower socio-economic classes. A classic correlated but not causual effect.
pozessed
Posts: 1,034
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4/17/2013 10:47:26 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 4/17/2013 10:29:30 AM, slo1 wrote:
At 4/17/2013 10:11:55 AM, pozessed wrote:
I'm just curious of what people think.

I believe that music we decide to listen to can make us more or less intelligent. Not only due to lyrical content but the frequencies and vibrations used s well.

Binaural beats = hokus pokus.

The GA governor who gave away Mozart CD's to new mothers and Florida law to play hour of classical music at day care = waste of tax payer monies.

I have never seen credible evidence that music can alter cognitive functioning involved in intelligence.

I do believe there is social conditioning that is involved with the music a person experiences thus likes.(see my post in the Science section that addresses a new study showing that people like new music when they can predict it (unconsciously).

The end result of social conditioning is that more well educated people are going to listen and enjoy classical music than lower socio-economic classes. A classic correlated but not causual effect.

What do you think of Julian Treasure?
slo1
Posts: 4,359
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4/17/2013 11:37:43 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 4/17/2013 10:47:26 AM, pozessed wrote:
At 4/17/2013 10:29:30 AM, slo1 wrote:
At 4/17/2013 10:11:55 AM, pozessed wrote:
I'm just curious of what people think.

I believe that music we decide to listen to can make us more or less intelligent. Not only due to lyrical content but the frequencies and vibrations used s well.

Binaural beats = hokus pokus.

The GA governor who gave away Mozart CD's to new mothers and Florida law to play hour of classical music at day care = waste of tax payer monies.

I have never seen credible evidence that music can alter cognitive functioning involved in intelligence.

I do believe there is social conditioning that is involved with the music a person experiences thus likes.(see my post in the Science section that addresses a new study showing that people like new music when they can predict it (unconsciously).

The end result of social conditioning is that more well educated people are going to listen and enjoy classical music than lower socio-economic classes. A classic correlated but not causual effect.

What do you think of Julian Treasure?

I think he brings up very good points on how sounds affect us, but I don't know of any instances where he has claimed certain types of music increase cognitive functions which we would classify as part of intelligence.
Sidewalker
Posts: 3,713
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4/17/2013 9:50:03 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 4/17/2013 10:11:55 AM, pozessed wrote:
I'm just curious of what people think.

I believe that music we decide to listen to can make us more or less intelligent. Not only due to lyrical content but the frequencies and vibrations used s well.

Definately, I once listend to rap music for three hours and coundn't even tie my shoes for two days, it was over a week before I could do simple math again.
"It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive." " C. W. Leadbeater