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Big Bang Simulated

slo1
Posts: 4,312
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9/2/2013 12:31:21 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
http://www.sciencedaily.com...

Ultracold Big Bang Experiment Successfully Simulates Evolution of Early Universe

Exerpts:

Aug. 29, 2013 " Physicists have reproduced a pattern resembling the cosmic microwave background radiation in a laboratory simulation of the big bang, using ultracold cesium atoms in a vacuum chamber at the University of Chicago

....
The cosmic microwave background is the echo of the big bang. Extensive measurements of the CMB have come from the orbiting Cosmic Background Explorer in the 1990s, and later by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and various ground-based observatories, including the UChicago-led South Pole Telescope collaboration. These tools have provided cosmologists with a snapshot of how the universe appeared approximately 380,000 years following the Big Bang, which marked the beginning of the universe.

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The sudden expansion of the universe during its inflationary period created ripples in space-time in the echo of the big bang. One can think of the big bang, in oversimplified terms, as an explosion that generated sound, Chin said. The sound waves began interfering with each other, creating complicated patterns. "That's the origin of complexity we see in the universe," he said.
These excitations are called Sakharov acoustic oscillations, named for Russian physicist Andrei Sakharov, who described the phenomenon in the 1960s. To produce Sakharov oscillations, Chin's team chilled a flat, smooth cloud of 10,000 or so cesium atoms to a billionth of a degree above absolute zero, creating an exotic state of matter known as a two-dimensional atomic superfluid.

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The goal is to better understand the cosmic evolution of a baby universe, the one that existed shortly after the big bang. It was much smaller then than it is today, having reached a diameter of only a hundred thousand light years by the time it had left the CMB pattern that cosmologists observe on the sky today.
In the end, what matters is not the absolute size of the simulated or the real universes, but their size ratios to the characteristic length scales governing the physics of Sakharov oscillations. "Here, of course, we are pushing this analogy to the extreme," Chin said.
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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9/2/2013 12:33:05 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
is there a video that you know of
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
slo1
Posts: 4,312
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9/2/2013 12:37:16 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Interesting experiment. It is not a true simulation, but looks at one factor in early universe that may have had impact on the formation of the universe as we know it.

It is cool that they replicated the pattern of the cosmic microwave background
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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9/2/2013 12:39:11 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/2/2013 12:37:16 PM, slo1 wrote:
Interesting experiment. It is not a true simulation, but looks at one factor in early universe that may have had impact on the formation of the universe as we know it.

It is cool that they replicated the pattern of the cosmic microwave background

oh nvm the only thing that is impossible to replicate is absolute zero. absolute zero is basically a place void of any matter or energy and cold as fvck
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
slo1
Posts: 4,312
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9/2/2013 1:32:15 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/2/2013 12:33:05 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
is there a video that you know of

Not that I know of. Their experiment was only 70 microns across, so a video would probably be very anti climatic.
slo1
Posts: 4,312
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9/2/2013 1:37:56 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/2/2013 12:39:11 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/2/2013 12:37:16 PM, slo1 wrote:
Interesting experiment. It is not a true simulation, but looks at one factor in early universe that may have had impact on the formation of the universe as we know it.

It is cool that they replicated the pattern of the cosmic microwave background

oh nvm the only thing that is impossible to replicate is absolute zero. absolute zero is basically a place void of any matter or energy and cold as fvck

It is good then as the universe has always had matter and there is no need to reach absolute zero to replicate its expansion.
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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9/2/2013 1:38:56 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/2/2013 1:37:56 PM, slo1 wrote:
At 9/2/2013 12:39:11 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/2/2013 12:37:16 PM, slo1 wrote:
Interesting experiment. It is not a true simulation, but looks at one factor in early universe that may have had impact on the formation of the universe as we know it.

It is cool that they replicated the pattern of the cosmic microwave background

oh nvm the only thing that is impossible to replicate is absolute zero. absolute zero is basically a place void of any matter or energy and cold as fvck

It is good then as our universe has always had matter and there is no need to reach absolute zero to replicate its expansion.

fix'd
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.