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Time Perception

Lordknukle
Posts: 12,788
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9/28/2013 12:08:31 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Would it be possible to see in "slow motion" time if the integration between the eye and the brain, or within either of them was improved?
"Easy is the descent to Avernus, for the door to the Underworld lies upon both day and night. But to retrace your steps and return to the breezes above- that's the task, that's the toil."
bladerunner060
Posts: 7,126
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9/28/2013 12:20:28 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/28/2013 12:08:31 AM, Lordknukle wrote:
Would it be possible to see in "slow motion" time if the integration between the eye and the brain, or within either of them was improved?

Time is processed distributively in the brain. There's some slop in the visual cortex (around a tenth of a second, ish, I believe) for our brain to synthesize everything, but simply speeding up our visual processing would not, I don't believe, in itself impact our time sense. Part of the problem is that while "slow down" is a recognized phenomenon, we don't have a solid handle on the mechanism.

http://en.wikipedia.org...
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Lordknukle
Posts: 12,788
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9/28/2013 3:30:51 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/28/2013 12:20:28 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 9/28/2013 12:08:31 AM, Lordknukle wrote:
Would it be possible to see in "slow motion" time if the integration between the eye and the brain, or within either of them was improved?

Time is processed distributively in the brain. There's some slop in the visual cortex (around a tenth of a second, ish, I believe) for our brain to synthesize everything, but simply speeding up our visual processing would not, I don't believe, in itself impact our time sense.

Why not? Imagine that you're seeing the world at X frames/second now, and this generates your perception of time. Since everybody sees the world at X frames/second, everybody's perception of time is the same. But if you were to speed up visual processing so that your brain could process XY, where y> 1, frames/second, your perception of time would "slow down," kind of like viewing the world through a slow motion camera.
"Easy is the descent to Avernus, for the door to the Underworld lies upon both day and night. But to retrace your steps and return to the breezes above- that's the task, that's the toil."
bladerunner060
Posts: 7,126
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9/28/2013 9:53:38 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/28/2013 3:30:51 PM, Lordknukle wrote:
At 9/28/2013 12:20:28 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 9/28/2013 12:08:31 AM, Lordknukle wrote:
Would it be possible to see in "slow motion" time if the integration between the eye and the brain, or within either of them was improved?

Time is processed distributively in the brain. There's some slop in the visual cortex (around a tenth of a second, ish, I believe) for our brain to synthesize everything, but simply speeding up our visual processing would not, I don't believe, in itself impact our time sense.

Why not? Imagine that you're seeing the world at X frames/second now, and this generates your perception of time. Since everybody sees the world at X frames/second, everybody's perception of time is the same. But if you were to speed up visual processing so that your brain could process XY, where y> 1, frames/second, your perception of time would "slow down," kind of like viewing the world through a slow motion camera.

No, it wouldn't--not necessarily. Think of it this way: you can film super slow mo at 39000 fps. But that being "super slow mo" is predicated on playing back at the standard FPS, which requires the processing to be performed differently. If you just played it back at native FPS, it wouldn't be slow motion, it would just be a lot of FPS, while events are still playing for the purposes of perception at the same speed.
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Floid
Posts: 751
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9/28/2013 10:01:22 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Bladerunner has your answer. In video the FPS of the recording is not what makes the time distortion, it is the frames per second of the playback. If you playback at half the FPS that you recorded then you "doubled time". There really isn't an analogy between this and what your brain is doing.
Lordknukle
Posts: 12,788
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9/28/2013 10:05:43 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/28/2013 9:53:38 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 9/28/2013 3:30:51 PM, Lordknukle wrote:
At 9/28/2013 12:20:28 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 9/28/2013 12:08:31 AM, Lordknukle wrote:
Would it be possible to see in "slow motion" time if the integration between the eye and the brain, or within either of them was improved?

Time is processed distributively in the brain. There's some slop in the visual cortex (around a tenth of a second, ish, I believe) for our brain to synthesize everything, but simply speeding up our visual processing would not, I don't believe, in itself impact our time sense.

Why not? Imagine that you're seeing the world at X frames/second now, and this generates your perception of time. Since everybody sees the world at X frames/second, everybody's perception of time is the same. But if you were to speed up visual processing so that your brain could process XY, where y> 1, frames/second, your perception of time would "slow down," kind of like viewing the world through a slow motion camera.

No, it wouldn't--not necessarily. Think of it this way: you can film super slow mo at 39000 fps. But that being "super slow mo" is predicated on playing back at the standard FPS, which requires the processing to be performed differently. If you just played it back at native FPS, it wouldn't be slow motion, it would just be a lot of FPS, while events are still playing for the purposes of perception at the same speed.

So the only way to affect time perception would be to both increase fps and decrease rate of playback, right? The first one is optional, but slow motion at lower fps looks like sh!t.
"Easy is the descent to Avernus, for the door to the Underworld lies upon both day and night. But to retrace your steps and return to the breezes above- that's the task, that's the toil."
bladerunner060
Posts: 7,126
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9/28/2013 10:16:59 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/28/2013 10:05:43 PM, Lordknukle wrote:
At 9/28/2013 9:53:38 PM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 9/28/2013 3:30:51 PM, Lordknukle wrote:
At 9/28/2013 12:20:28 AM, bladerunner060 wrote:
At 9/28/2013 12:08:31 AM, Lordknukle wrote:
Would it be possible to see in "slow motion" time if the integration between the eye and the brain, or within either of them was improved?

Time is processed distributively in the brain. There's some slop in the visual cortex (around a tenth of a second, ish, I believe) for our brain to synthesize everything, but simply speeding up our visual processing would not, I don't believe, in itself impact our time sense.

Why not? Imagine that you're seeing the world at X frames/second now, and this generates your perception of time. Since everybody sees the world at X frames/second, everybody's perception of time is the same. But if you were to speed up visual processing so that your brain could process XY, where y> 1, frames/second, your perception of time would "slow down," kind of like viewing the world through a slow motion camera.

No, it wouldn't--not necessarily. Think of it this way: you can film super slow mo at 39000 fps. But that being "super slow mo" is predicated on playing back at the standard FPS, which requires the processing to be performed differently. If you just played it back at native FPS, it wouldn't be slow motion, it would just be a lot of FPS, while events are still playing for the purposes of perception at the same speed.

So the only way to affect time perception would be to both increase fps and decrease rate of playback, right? The first one is optional, but slow motion at lower fps looks like sh!t.

Remember, too, that the brain processes holistically...faking it, too, when it has to, to make the things it thinks should sync, sync. So that's why just mucking with visual perception won't get the effect you want. You need to get to more of the brain's processing to get the brain to slow the perception. Some drugs do it.
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Sidewalker
Posts: 3,713
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9/29/2013 5:53:09 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I'm pretty sure that's how Miguel Cabrera does it.
"It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive." " C. W. Leadbeater