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supersonic in space

suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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12/13/2013 12:00:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I am just wondering, what would happened if we're to initiate supersonic engine in space?

Of course we can't really use jet engine in space but what about we used fuel solid to create thrust of equal power to those we use to break sound barrier in atmospheric environment and sustained them until the entire fuel is gone?

How mush faster can we do space travel in this manner? Would it allow us to reach a further planet like Pluto in practical time?
Enji
Posts: 1,022
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12/13/2013 3:43:03 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/13/2013 12:00:07 PM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
I am just wondering, what would happened if we're to initiate supersonic engine in space?

Of course we can't really use jet engine in space but what about we used fuel solid to create thrust of equal power to those we use to break sound barrier in atmospheric environment and sustained them until the entire fuel is gone?

How mush faster can we do space travel in this manner? Would it allow us to reach a further planet like Pluto in practical time?

The speed of sound is about 0.34 kilometres per second through air at sea level (sound doesn't travel in space since there isn't a medium for it to travel through). To compare, when the Mars rovers entered Mars's atmosphere, they were travelling at 5.4 kilometres per second - nearly 16 times faster than the speed of sound. [http://www.jpl.nasa.gov...]
suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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12/14/2013 1:16:45 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/13/2013 3:43:03 PM, Enji wrote:
At 12/13/2013 12:00:07 PM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
I am just wondering, what would happened if we're to initiate supersonic engine in space?

Of course we can't really use jet engine in space but what about we used fuel solid to create thrust of equal power to those we use to break sound barrier in atmospheric environment and sustained them until the entire fuel is gone?

How mush faster can we do space travel in this manner? Would it allow us to reach a further planet like Pluto in practical time?

The speed of sound is about 0.34 kilometres per second through air at sea level (sound doesn't travel in space since there isn't a medium for it to travel through). To compare, when the Mars rovers entered Mars's atmosphere, they were travelling at 5.4 kilometres per second - nearly 16 times faster than the speed of sound. [http://www.jpl.nasa.gov...]

I think space travel is always supersonic. What I think is that, for most of the time, the energy need to create supersonic travel in space will always be significantly lower than in atmospherics condition.

What if we provide them with the same level of energy on earth? Shouldn't that make space travel mush faster?
Enji
Posts: 1,022
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12/14/2013 9:19:52 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/14/2013 1:16:45 AM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
At 12/13/2013 3:43:03 PM, Enji wrote:
At 12/13/2013 12:00:07 PM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
I am just wondering, what would happened if we're to initiate supersonic engine in space?

Of course we can't really use jet engine in space but what about we used fuel solid to create thrust of equal power to those we use to break sound barrier in atmospheric environment and sustained them until the entire fuel is gone?

How mush faster can we do space travel in this manner? Would it allow us to reach a further planet like Pluto in practical time?

The speed of sound is about 0.34 kilometres per second through air at sea level (sound doesn't travel in space since there isn't a medium for it to travel through). To compare, when the Mars rovers entered Mars's atmosphere, they were travelling at 5.4 kilometres per second - nearly 16 times faster than the speed of sound. [http://www.jpl.nasa.gov...]

I think space travel is always supersonic. What I think is that, for most of the time, the energy need to create supersonic travel in space will always be significantly lower than in atmospherics condition.

What if we provide them with the same level of energy on earth? Shouldn't that make space travel mush faster?

Space travel isn't supersonic because space is essentially a vacuum and sound doesn't travel.

Rocket thrusters already provide more thrust than supersonic jet engines. The fastest plane is the sr-71 blackbird, whose engines provide a thrust of 145 kN; the Delta II rockets used to launch the Mars rovers provide a thrust of 446 kN, and other rockets can provide more thrust. [http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov...]

Also, space travel isn't simply a matter of going the fastest possible; you also have to consider navigation and navigation corrections, atmospheric re-entry, and landing.
themohawkninja
Posts: 816
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12/14/2013 12:49:46 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/13/2013 12:00:07 PM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
I am just wondering, what would happened if we're to initiate supersonic engine in space?

Of course we can't really use jet engine in space but what about we used fuel solid to create thrust of equal power to those we use to break sound barrier in atmospheric environment and sustained them until the entire fuel is gone?

How mush faster can we do space travel in this manner? Would it allow us to reach a further planet like Pluto in practical time?

Well, the Bell X1 (which broke the sound barrier) used an engine with 1600 lbf of force with what looks to be about 5,000 lbs of fuel (7,000 lbs empty, 12,225 loaded, so just call the 225 the pilot and the other 5,000 the fuel, and it's probably a decent guess). It also had an ISP of 279 seconds.

Delta V = ve*ln(m0/m1)

ve = 279*9.81 = 2737
m0 = 12,225
m1 = 5,000

Delta V = 2447 m/s

Original X1 top speed = 428 m/s

2447 - 428 = 2019

So to answer your question, you would be going 2019 m/s faster in space.
"Morals are simply a limit to man's potential."~Myself

Political correctness is like saying you can't have a steak, because a baby can't eat one ~Unknown
suttichart.denpruektham
Posts: 1,115
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12/15/2013 9:54:59 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 12/14/2013 9:19:52 AM, Enji wrote:
At 12/14/2013 1:16:45 AM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
At 12/13/2013 3:43:03 PM, Enji wrote:
At 12/13/2013 12:00:07 PM, suttichart.denpruektham wrote:
I am just wondering, what would happened if we're to initiate supersonic engine in space?

Of course we can't really use jet engine in space but what about we used fuel solid to create thrust of equal power to those we use to break sound barrier in atmospheric environment and sustained them until the entire fuel is gone?

How mush faster can we do space travel in this manner? Would it allow us to reach a further planet like Pluto in practical time?

The speed of sound is about 0.34 kilometres per second through air at sea level (sound doesn't travel in space since there isn't a medium for it to travel through). To compare, when the Mars rovers entered Mars's atmosphere, they were travelling at 5.4 kilometres per second - nearly 16 times faster than the speed of sound. [http://www.jpl.nasa.gov...]

I think space travel is always supersonic. What I think is that, for most of the time, the energy need to create supersonic travel in space will always be significantly lower than in atmospherics condition.

What if we provide them with the same level of energy on earth? Shouldn't that make space travel mush faster?

Space travel isn't supersonic because space is essentially a vacuum and sound doesn't travel.

Rocket thrusters already provide more thrust than supersonic jet engines. The fastest plane is the sr-71 blackbird, whose engines provide a thrust of 145 kN; the Delta II rockets used to launch the Mars rovers provide a thrust of 446 kN, and other rockets can provide more thrust. [http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov...]

Also, space travel isn't simply a matter of going the fastest possible; you also have to consider navigation and navigation corrections, atmospheric re-entry, and landing.

I see, so that's already happened.

Guest it would take us another century to colonize the Mar huh?
D