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Two genes just discovered - Bipolar

slo1
Posts: 4,308
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3/13/2014 3:31:40 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
http://www.sciencedaily.com...

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The search for genes involved in manic-depressive disorder is like looking for a needle in a haystack. "The contributions of individual genes are so minor that they normally cannot be identified in the 'background noise' of genetic differences," explains Prof. Cichon from the University of Basel Hospital. Only when the DNA from very large numbers of patients with bipolar disorder are compared to the genetic material from an equally large number of healthy persons can differences be confirmed statistically. Such suspect regions which indicate a disease are known by scientists as candidate genes.
Two new gene regions discovered and three known gene regions confirmed
Using automated analysis methods, the researchers recorded about 2.3 million different regions in the genetic material of patients and comparators, respectively. The subsequent evaluation using biostatistical methods revealed a total of five risk regions on the DNA associated with bipolar disorder. Two of these regions were newly discovered: The gene "ADCY2" on chromosome five and the so-called "MIR2113-POU3F2" region on chromosome six. The risk regions "ANK3," "ODZ4" and "TRANK1" have already been described in prior studies. "These gene regions were, however, statistically better confirmed in our current investigation -- the connection with bipolar disorder has now become even clearer," says Prof. N"then.
The researchers are particularly interested in the newly discovered gene region "ADCY2." It codes an enzyme which is involved in the conduction of signals into nerve cells. "This fits very well with observations that the signal transfer in certain regions of the brain is impaired in patients with bipolar disorder," explains the human geneticist of the University of Bonn Hospital. With their search for genetic regions, the scientists are gradually clarifying the causes of manic-depressive disorder. "Only when we know the biological foundations of this disease can be also identify starting points for new therapies," says Prof. N"then.
slo1
Posts: 4,308
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3/13/2014 3:41:06 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
We are just scratching the surface of what the 3 billion plus base pairs do. Interesting on how we are now getting more capable of forming theories on not only what one gene can do, but a collection of them do.

There was another article about a bit of RNA that disrupts a perfectly good gene that is responsible for building an enzyme that regulates calcium. It results in the heart enlarging and eventual heart failure or at least is implicated in that.
http://www.sciencedaily.com...

We have so much more to learn about cellular functioning. Just take a developed human and methaylation, chemicals, rna, dna, radiation, etc and we don't have a clue how collections of factors can mess up functioning.

Now think of an embryo or small child who is still developing organs such as the brain. How does all that stuff affect brain development and how the kid functions in the long run?