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Underwater astonishments

Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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2/20/2010 9:54:17 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 2/20/2010 9:40:32 PM, Puck wrote:
Fans of Pharyngula may have already seen.



Beautiful.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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2/20/2010 10:59:31 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
The real exploration will happen when we find a way to see down there without interferring with the ecosystem down there.

Since the environment is not use to light, we can't simply go down with a flashlight. So we have to use something other then standard light.

What would be nice (though many animal conservationalists may disagree) would be to catch a few from several different species to see what wavelengths their eyes can detect (this would likely result in the death of those that we catch to experiment on their eyes), then use a light frequency that their eyes can't detect so we can see but the light doesn't interfere with them.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
sherlockmethod
Posts: 317
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2/21/2010 10:29:16 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
Can we not simulate the environment on the computer with one of the evolution programs Dr. Pennock is working on? This solution, if it is one, may work. I'm not sure.
Library cards: Stopping stupid one book at a time.
Aesius
Posts: 7
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2/23/2010 8:21:47 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 2/20/2010 10:59:31 PM, OreEle wrote:
The real exploration will happen when we find a way to see down there without interferring with the ecosystem down there.

What would be nice (though many animal conservationalists may disagree) would be to catch a few from several different species to see what wavelengths their eyes can detect (this would likely result in the death of those that we catch to experiment on their eyes), then use a light frequency that their eyes can't detect so we can see but the light doesn't interfere with them.

The difficulty with this is that many of the animals that deep are used to incredible pressure. Most die when brought to the surface, and their remains tend to collapse upon themselves.

Also, I would say most conservationists would support such an endeavor, as understanding an animal helps to conserve it, if done in a sustainable way.