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Acquired Inheritance

slo1
Posts: 4,353
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7/18/2014 8:26:00 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
http://www.sciencedaily.com...

Starving women who gave birth during the famine had children who were unusually susceptible to obesity and other metabolic disorders, as were their grandchildren. Controlled animal experiments have found similar results, including a study in rats demonstrating that chronic high-fat diets in fathers result in obesity in their female offspring.

Read the full article in the link.
slo1
Posts: 4,353
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7/18/2014 8:30:36 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
This is fascinating. We already know that methylation can be an environmental change that can get passed to offspring, now there maybe other environmental changes in cell functioning that is also passed.

I read a book many years ago called, "The case of the midwife toad". A guy who was using toads and claimed he was able to get pads on the inner legs to grow and pass to their offspring. Apparently helped the males mount the females during reproduction. He was lambasted as a fraud.

Maybe someone should relook at his experiments to understand if something such as that could be an acquired trait.

As knowledge grows in this space and if pans out, it could be the silver bullet in evolution deniers premises.
ThoughtsandThoughts
Posts: 178
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7/19/2014 6:36:30 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/18/2014 8:26:00 AM, slo1 wrote:
http://www.sciencedaily.com...

Starving women who gave birth during the famine had children who were unusually susceptible to obesity and other metabolic disorders, as were their grandchildren. Controlled animal experiments have found similar results, including a study in rats demonstrating that chronic high-fat diets in fathers result in obesity in their female offspring.


Read the full article in the link.

I've read about this before. I actually have the book still ("Why Don't Zebras Get Ulcers?"), I wonder if I can find the page and quote it here...

Anyway, stuff like that (starvation during pregnancy) is called prenatal stress. I believe the children these women give birth to are also more at risk for diabetes and the higher the baby weight at birth, the less likely the risk for obesity and diabetes. If I remember correctly, even what people consider normal birth weights are more at risk. It seems contradicting, but it makes sense. The book I read talked about this being a survival tool for the baby, who is "trained" to come into this world starving and to start storing fat. I mean, if the mother is starving, then odds are, the food supply is limited for the baby too.