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Gut Bacteria

slo1
Posts: 4,316
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8/18/2014 2:47:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Every day more and more is learned about gut bacteria and we are dependent upon it for health. Below is just a couple recent articles, but there are literally many studies going on to better understand how hour gut bacteria help and hinder us.

I find it fascinating, but I also am reluctant to run out to the supplements currently marketed that adds certain bacteria to the gut. It seems like there needs to be a much better understanding about which ones are good and which mix is best.

Some reading for those interested.

http://www.sciencedaily.com...

Summary:
Antibiotic exposure during a critical window of early development disrupts the bacterial landscape of the gut, home to trillions of diverse microbes, and permanently reprograms the body"s metabolism, setting up a predisposition to obesity, according to a new study. Moreover, the research shows that it is altered gut bacteria, rather than the antibiotics, driving the metabolic effects.

http://www.sciencedaily.com...
It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us -- which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold -- may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity.

http://www.sciencedaily.com...
Children with eczema have a more diverse set of bacteria in their guts than non affected children, finds a new study. The types of bacteria present were also more typical of adult gut microbes than for toddlers without eczema. Eczema is a chronic inflammation of the epidermis.
slo1
Posts: 4,316
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9/11/2014 2:26:29 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
"In women who had more diverse communities of gut bacteria, higher levels of estrogen fragments were left after the body metabolized the hormone, compared to women with less diverse intestinal bacteria," said one of the study's authors, James Goedert, MD, of the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, MD. "This pattern suggests that these women may have a lower risk of developing breast cancer."

http://www.sciencedaily.com...
slo1
Posts: 4,316
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9/11/2014 2:28:38 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Mice treated with antibiotics to remove most of their intestinal bacteria or raised under sterile conditions have impaired antibody responses to seasonal influenza vaccination, researchers have found. The findings suggest that antibiotic treatment before or during vaccination may impair responses to certain vaccines in humans.

http://www.sciencedaily.com...
slo1
Posts: 4,316
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9/11/2014 2:31:33 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Before go hog wild with the active cultures and yoghurt, might want to wait to see what it does to the level of diversity of gut bacteria.

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Fermented foods, and especially yoghurts, contain large amounts of live bacteria. We have been consuming them since the Neolithic Era (12,000 years ago), but our understanding of their impact on the digestive tract remains limited. Until recently, technological barriers prevented from studying in details the billions of bacteria living in our gut. The European consortium MetaHIT[1], coordinated by INRA, has made major breakthroughs in this field that expanded the scientific knowledge on the role of this microbiota and resulted in the discovery of many bacterial species hitherto unknown.
http://www.sciencedaily.com...
chui
Posts: 507
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9/12/2014 10:51:47 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 8/18/2014 2:47:07 PM, slo1 wrote:



http://www.sciencedaily.com...
It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us -- which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold -- may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity.

Thanks for posting this, found it most interesting, particularly the fact that the gut population can change over short time spans. I heard a report that consuming low-calorie sugar substitutes can actually raise peoples desire for sugar. It might be that gut bacteria may be responsibly for this.
slo1
Posts: 4,316
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6/10/2015 7:33:54 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Time to keep adding to the wonder of gut bacteria.

Link to Toddler Behaviors to Gut Bacteria
http://www.sciencedaily.com...

Christian and study co-author, microbiologist Michael Bailey, PhD, studied stool samples from 77 girls and boys, and found that children with the most genetically diverse types of gut bacteria more frequently exhibited behaviors related with positive mood, curiosity, sociability and impulsivity. In boys only, researchers reported that extroverted personality traits were associated with the abundances of microbes from the Rikenellaceae and Ruminococcaceae families and Dialister and Parabacteroides genera.

"There is definitely communication between bacteria in the gut and the brain, but we don't know which one starts the conversation," said Dr. Bailey, who is currently a researcher with Nationwide Children's Hospital and a member of Ohio State's Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research. "Maybe kids who are more outgoing have fewer stress hormones impacting their gut than shy kids. Or maybe the bacteria are helping mitigate the production of stress hormones when the child encounters something new. It could be a combination of both."
slo1
Posts: 4,316
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6/10/2015 7:36:53 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/10/2015 7:33:54 AM, slo1 wrote:
Time to keep adding to the wonder of gut bacteria.

Link to Toddler Behaviors to Gut Bacteria
http://www.sciencedaily.com...

Christian and study co-author, microbiologist Michael Bailey, PhD, studied stool samples from 77 girls and boys, and found that children with the most genetically diverse types of gut bacteria more frequently exhibited behaviors related with positive mood, curiosity, sociability and impulsivity. In boys only, researchers reported that extroverted personality traits were associated with the abundances of microbes from the Rikenellaceae and Ruminococcaceae families and Dialister and Parabacteroides genera.

"There is definitely communication between bacteria in the gut and the brain, but we don't know which one starts the conversation," said Dr. Bailey, who is currently a researcher with Nationwide Children's Hospital and a member of Ohio State's Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research. "Maybe kids who are more outgoing have fewer stress hormones impacting their gut than shy kids. Or maybe the bacteria are helping mitigate the production of stress hormones when the child encounters something new. It could be a combination of both."


I forgot to add this little tibit from the article, which matched my sentiment in the first post.

Both researchers say that parents shouldn't try to change their child's gut microbiome just yet. Scientists still don't know what a healthy combination looks like, or what might influence its development.

Makes one wonder if all the supplements out there with gut bacteria will one day be found to be detrimental versus helpful.