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Entanglement Imaging Method

slo1
Posts: 4,308
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8/29/2014 8:11:48 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
This is amazing. Check out the link to see the images and full story, below an exerpt.

http://www.sciencedaily.com...

The experiment published in Nature this week for the first time breaks this seemingly self-evident limitation. The object (e.g. the contour of a cat) is illuminated with light that remains undetected. Moreover, the light that forms an image of the cat on the camera never interacts with it. In order to realise their experiment, the scientists use so-called "entangled" pairs of photons. These pairs of photons -- which are like interlinked twins -- are created when a laser interacts with a non-linear crystal. In the experiment, the laser illuminates two separate crystals, creating one pair of twin photons (consisting of one infrared photon and a "sister" red photon) in either crystal. The object is placed in between the two crystals. The arrangement is such that if a photon pair is created in the first crystal, only the infrared photon passes through the imaged object. Its path then goes through the second crystal where it fully combines with any infrared photons that would be created there.

With this crucial step, there is now, in principle, no possibility to find out which crystal actually created the photon pair. Moreover, there is now no information in the infrared photon about the object. However, due to the quantum correlations of the entangled pairs the information about the object is now contained in the red photons -- although they never touched the object. Bringing together both paths of the red photons (from the first and the second crystal) creates bright and dark patterns, which form the exact image of the object.
slo1
Posts: 4,308
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8/29/2014 8:33:19 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
For all the lay people like my self, the amazing thing here is that a light particle interacts with a thing. The data of that interaction some how gets to a second light particle that never interacted with the thing and that second photon goes on to a detector to form a picture of the thing. Of course there is more than one photon involved to form a complete picture.

The mystery here is how did the data transfer from one particle to another? The other mystery is that it is proven if one were to separate the receiver photon (the one that does not interact with the thing, but is used in the image) a very long distance away, so it had to travel. The data transfer from the first particle to the second particle is faster that the speed of light. (If one can truly call it a data transfer) It truly is mind baffling and amazing.

A number of things:

1. I'm trying to imagine how the quantum schools that believe in locality would explain this experiment.

2. It amazes me that there is this fantastic mystery staring right in front of us and if you were to ask the average person they have no concept of what it is nor even care about it.
apb4y
Posts: 480
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9/5/2014 6:02:52 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 8/29/2014 8:33:19 AM, slo1 wrote:

The mystery here is how did the data transfer from one particle to another? The other mystery is that it is proven if one were to separate the receiver photon (the one that does not interact with the thing, but is used in the image) a very long distance away, so it had to travel. The data transfer from the first particle to the second particle is faster that the speed of light. (If one can truly call it a data transfer) It truly is mind baffling and amazing.

Another explanation is that quantum entanglement doesn't transfer information across space-time; rather, it ignores the concept completely. If this is true, it should be able to retrieve information from black holes, communicate with other universes, send information into the past and, once we've figured out out to entangle macroscopic objects, teleport particles, people and even planets anywhere in existence.

One thing I think is a given: wormholes are outdated. Quantum entanglement is easier, cheaper, faster, safer, more accurate, and doesn't require a spatial link to your destination.
slo1
Posts: 4,308
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9/6/2014 1:44:43 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/5/2014 6:02:52 PM, apb4y wrote:
At 8/29/2014 8:33:19 AM, slo1 wrote:

The mystery here is how did the data transfer from one particle to another? The other mystery is that it is proven if one were to separate the receiver photon (the one that does not interact with the thing, but is used in the image) a very long distance away, so it had to travel. The data transfer from the first particle to the second particle is faster that the speed of light. (If one can truly call it a data transfer) It truly is mind baffling and amazing.

Another explanation is that quantum entanglement doesn't transfer information across space-time; rather, it ignores the concept completely. If this is true, it should be able to retrieve information from black holes, communicate with other universes, send information into the past and, once we've figured out out to entangle macroscopic objects, teleport particles, people and even planets anywhere in existence.

One thing I think is a given: wormholes are outdated. Quantum entanglement is easier, cheaper, faster, safer, more accurate, and doesn't require a spatial link to your destination.

I think it will be involved in producing ciphers which are unbreakable, but the problem is that it does require a spatial link, unless there is a way to create particles which are entangled which are already separate.

The only way to produce entangled things is to have them interact. They then need to separate. That separation can not exceed the speed of light as the current consensus agrees. Once they are separated the information from one is immediate known at the other, but they have to get into position.
apb4y
Posts: 480
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9/6/2014 6:03:52 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/6/2014 1:44:43 PM, slo1 wrote:

I think it will be involved in producing ciphers which are unbreakable, but the problem is that it does require a spatial link, unless there is a way to create particles which are entangled which are already separate.

I meant: it doesn't require a spatial link after they're entangled.

The only way to produce entangled things is to have them interact. They then need to separate. That separation can not exceed the speed of light as the current consensus agrees. Once they are separated the information from one is immediate known at the other, but they have to get into position.

If one of those particles was moved to Alpha Centauri, and then measured, the other would instantly collapse even though light takes 4.5 years to travel the distance.