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cell function -how the bits get around

slo1
Posts: 4,318
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9/5/2014 1:21:26 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Been meaning to post this for a while and just found the article again. In all the discussions about information and using computer analogies on how dna and cellular function works, it is never considered that all the little bits floating around the cell and how they get into close proximity to react with each other.

When the RNA is patching the different amino acids (20 different kinds) together to form a protein, the base pairs in the ribsome that deterimes which amino acid join the string and when based upon the order of base pairs.

It was previously thought that all the bits, molecules, structures would move through out the cytoplasm via thermal diffusion.

This new model changes that to indicate that there is physical motion within the cytoplasm that moves the bits around like a wave on the ocean.
http://www.sciencedaily.com...

Either way, there still is a random happenings in cell & dna functions that are required for life. There is no instructions that say, "Hey, little bit of threonine come over here so I can insert you into this string of amino acids to make this protein."

I understand that this will not change anyone's mind on the possibility of life from non replicating matter, but it is important because computer models and information philosophy is only philosophical in nature because it does not address all cellular function to sustain the continuous repetitive electro-chemical reactions we call life.
apb4y
Posts: 480
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9/5/2014 5:38:09 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/5/2014 1:21:26 PM, slo1 wrote:

[stuff]

Vesicles, etc, are moved around the cell via the cytoskeleton, which works kind of a like a train track. Stuff binds to the cytoskeleton, and then gets "walked" up the track really fast until it reaches its destination. The tracks themselves are continuously built and degraded by the centrosome.
slo1
Posts: 4,318
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9/6/2014 1:59:17 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 9/5/2014 5:38:09 PM, apb4y wrote:
At 9/5/2014 1:21:26 PM, slo1 wrote:

[stuff]

Vesicles, etc, are moved around the cell via the cytoskeleton, which works kind of a like a train track. Stuff binds to the cytoskeleton, and then gets "walked" up the track really fast until it reaches its destination. The tracks themselves are continuously built and degraded by the centrosome.

That is great addition to how some organelles move within the cell. The main organelle involved with creating proteins are the Ribosomes. They free floating or membrane bound. Either way they require to come into contact with the amino acid they are zipping into the chain at the right moment to complete a protein. There is no mechanism/program to have them come into contact with each other.

Someone might say that the design/program creates the wave that causes motion within the cell so they will eventually come in contact, but the point it that computer analogies are not accurate to cellular function because they are analogies.
Otokage
Posts: 2,347
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9/7/2014 7:31:26 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I agree. This is not only seen in cytoplasmic streaming, but in almost everything that we find in cell, since no elements are behaving in a different way than they would do outside a living organism.

So, since cell elements behave as expected according to the physicochemical laws also perceived in the inert matter (apparently not analogous to a computer) , we can not say that the cell or its elements are, in this sense, computers.

On another thread, I had a guy telling me that since iPods are created by men, therefore cells are created by intelligent beings too. Which makes absolutely no sense because cells are not iPods (apparently not obvious for some people).

In summary: cells are systems, and we can draw analogies between them and almost any system (including computers), but they won't cease to be cells.
Sidewalker
Posts: 3,713
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9/8/2014 8:17:16 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
"It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive." " C. W. Leadbeater