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Has Evolution Stopped?

NewAgeMan
Posts: 3
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10/22/2014 6:39:38 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
We have been evolving for billions of years from single cell organism to many more complex ones.

Many civilisations have come and gone. And I understand that most of life on earth have gone extinct already (some 99.9%). But, life hasn't stopped altogether, instead it has evolved to adapt and survive.

1. Are we going to become extinct or are we going to evolve into something else?

2. Is our civilisation going to perish like many other ancient ones?
v3nesl
Posts: 4,505
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10/22/2014 10:57:53 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/22/2014 6:39:38 AM, NewAgeMan wrote:
We have been evolving for billions of years from single cell organism to many more complex ones.


personally, I think that's bull dung, but the idea that evolution has stopped might be an interesting idea to salvage the evo hypothesis. Since evolution clearly cannot be observed nor replicated, why not suggest is has reached some sort of equilibrium, and that's why we can't apply the scientific method to it?


1. Are we going to become extinct or are we going to evolve into something else?


Barring some outside influence, we will go extinct. The aggregate human genome continues to accumulate mutations, which we call "genetic disease" in humans. These dysfunctional parts of the genome are partially offset by our remarkable brains, via medicine, but eventually they will overwhelm us and we will go extinct.

Life, in the real world outside of the evo fantasy, is a machine. An incredibly well oiled machine, but not a perpetual motion machine, so like all machines, it will eventually fail. We've seen plenty of individual species go extinct already (and no new ones emerge) - eventually that happens to the ecosystem as a whole. When the cockroaches have no more to eat, then it's all over.
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apb4y
Posts: 480
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10/22/2014 6:49:30 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/22/2014 6:39:38 AM, NewAgeMan wrote:
We have been evolving for billions of years from single cell organism to many more complex ones.

Many civilisations have come and gone. And I understand that most of life on earth have gone extinct already (some 99.9%). But, life hasn't stopped altogether, instead it has evolved to adapt and survive.

1. Are we going to become extinct or are we going to evolve into something else?

I doubt we'll go extinct. We're spread all over the planet, which mitigates the damage done by nuclear wars, disasters and epidemics. We'll almost certainly evolve though. This is going to become more apparent as we colonise other planets: the distance between planets acts as a barrier to gene flow, and thus creates separate populations. Given enough time, speciation will occur, and we'll have multiple human species roaming the galaxy.

2. Is our civilisation going to perish like many other ancient ones?

Not for another few hundred years.

At 10/22/2014 10:57:53 AM, v3nesl wrote:

Barring some outside influence, we will go extinct. The aggregate human genome continues to accumulate mutations, which we call "genetic disease" in humans. These dysfunctional parts of the genome are partially offset by our remarkable brains, via medicine, but eventually they will overwhelm us and we will go extinct.

Most genetic diseases are around because they:

a) Don't kick in until after the age at which most people breed, and thus escape Natural Selection.

b) Served some function in the past that is no longer needed. Examples include Type-1 Diabetes (excess sugar in blood kept it from freezing during the Ice Age) and Sickle-Cell Anemia (increases malaria resistance).

c) Are caused by a combination of other alleles that are, by themselves, not deadly.
jodybirdy
Posts: 2,089
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10/24/2014 4:06:59 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/22/2014 6:49:30 PM, apb4y wrote:
At 10/22/2014 6:39:38 AM, NewAgeMan wrote:
We have been evolving for billions of years from single cell organism to many more complex ones.

Many civilisations have come and gone. And I understand that most of life on earth have gone extinct already (some 99.9%). But, life hasn't stopped altogether, instead it has evolved to adapt and survive.

1. Are we going to become extinct or are we going to evolve into something else?

I doubt we'll go extinct. We're spread all over the planet, which mitigates the damage done by nuclear wars, disasters and epidemics. We'll almost certainly evolve though. This is going to become more apparent as we colonise other planets: the distance between planets acts as a barrier to gene flow, and thus creates separate populations. Given enough time, speciation will occur, and we'll have multiple human species roaming the galaxy.

2. Is our civilisation going to perish like many other ancient ones?

Not for another few hundred years.

At 10/22/2014 10:57:53 AM, v3nesl wrote:

Barring some outside influence, we will go extinct. The aggregate human genome continues to accumulate mutations, which we call "genetic disease" in humans. These dysfunctional parts of the genome are partially offset by our remarkable brains, via medicine, but eventually they will overwhelm us and we will go extinct.

Most genetic diseases are around because they:

a) Don't kick in until after the age at which most people breed, and thus escape Natural Selection.

b) Served some function in the past that is no longer needed. Examples include Type-1 Diabetes (excess sugar in blood kept it from freezing during the Ice Age) and Sickle-Cell Anemia (increases malaria resistance).

c) Are caused by a combination of other alleles that are, by themselves, not deadly.

Something that has puzzled me for a while now is the affect that modern medicine could have on natural selection and how modern conveniences might change the outcome in regards to survival of the fittest. You don't have to be very smart to survive in this day in age. Do you think that that would affect the evolution and development of our species in the long term?
A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral."
v3nesl
Posts: 4,505
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10/24/2014 7:35:17 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/24/2014 4:06:59 AM, jodybirdy wrote:
...

Something that has puzzled me for a while now is the affect that modern medicine could have on natural selection and how modern conveniences might change the outcome in regards to survival of the fittest. You don't have to be very smart to survive in this day in age. Do you think that that would affect the evolution and development of our species in the long term?

And note - the ability to do modern medicine had to be selected long before it actually became a benefit to the species. It's another example of how the "selecting one small change at a time" idea really can't work in the real world. Systems have to be designed, a whole bunch of things have to happen BEFORE the system's effect can be obtained. The root problem with Darwinian evolution is that mutations cannot be prophetic.
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jodybirdy
Posts: 2,089
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10/24/2014 3:02:15 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/24/2014 7:35:17 AM, v3nesl wrote:
At 10/24/2014 4:06:59 AM, jodybirdy wrote:
...

Something that has puzzled me for a while now is the affect that modern medicine could have on natural selection and how modern conveniences might change the outcome in regards to survival of the fittest. You don't have to be very smart to survive in this day in age. Do you think that that would affect the evolution and development of our species in the long term?

And note - the ability to do modern medicine had to be selected long before it actually became a benefit to the species. It's another example of how the "selecting one small change at a time" idea really can't work in the real world. Systems have to be designed, a whole bunch of things have to happen BEFORE the system's effect can be obtained. The root problem with Darwinian evolution is that mutations cannot be prophetic.

I hadn't really considered looking at it that way. That is an interesting point. Something I will think about. Thank you.
A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral."