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Evidence of Dark Matter

Subutai
Posts: 3,223
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12/12/2014 9:10:01 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Dark matter has often been accused of being ad hoc by its detractors, simply explaining what we can't explain. However, scientists have found much needed hard evidence for the existence of dark matter:

One group of scientists detected it by analyzing X-rays emitted by two celestial objects, the Perseus galaxy cluster and the Andromeda galaxy. After collecting thousands of signals from ESA's XMM-Newton telescope and eliminating all of those coming from known particles and atoms, the scientists found an anomaly that caught their attention.

The signal appears as a weak, atypical photon emission that could not be attributed to any known form of matter.

"The signal's distribution within the galaxy corresponds exactly to what we were expecting with dark matter, that is, concentrated and intense in the center of objects and weaker and diffuse on the edges," said Oleg Ruchayskiy, one of the researchers, in a news release.


http://www.scienceworldreport.com...

Thoughts?
I'm becoming less defined as days go by, fading away, and well you might say, I'm losing focus, kinda drifting into the abstract in terms of how I see myself.
Envisage
Posts: 3,646
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12/12/2014 10:25:02 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/12/2014 9:10:01 AM, Subutai wrote:
Dark matter has often been accused of being ad hoc by its detractors, simply explaining what we can't explain. However, scientists have found much needed hard evidence for the existence of dark matter:

One group of scientists detected it by analyzing X-rays emitted by two celestial objects, the Perseus galaxy cluster and the Andromeda galaxy. After collecting thousands of signals from ESA's XMM-Newton telescope and eliminating all of those coming from known particles and atoms, the scientists found an anomaly that caught their attention.

The signal appears as a weak, atypical photon emission that could not be attributed to any known form of matter.

"The signal's distribution within the galaxy corresponds exactly to what we were expecting with dark matter, that is, concentrated and intense in the center of objects and weaker and diffuse on the edges," said Oleg Ruchayskiy, one of the researchers, in a news release.


http://www.scienceworldreport.com...

Thoughts?

If they can expand this to more examples it seems it would be quite compelling. They can predict where dark matter is via gravitational lensing, so they just need to look there to see if the signal is consistent with them.

Easier said than done...
slo1
Posts: 4,351
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12/12/2014 11:22:23 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/12/2014 10:25:02 AM, Envisage wrote:
At 12/12/2014 9:10:01 AM, Subutai wrote:
Dark matter has often been accused of being ad hoc by its detractors, simply explaining what we can't explain. However, scientists have found much needed hard evidence for the existence of dark matter:

One group of scientists detected it by analyzing X-rays emitted by two celestial objects, the Perseus galaxy cluster and the Andromeda galaxy. After collecting thousands of signals from ESA's XMM-Newton telescope and eliminating all of those coming from known particles and atoms, the scientists found an anomaly that caught their attention.

The signal appears as a weak, atypical photon emission that could not be attributed to any known form of matter.

"The signal's distribution within the galaxy corresponds exactly to what we were expecting with dark matter, that is, concentrated and intense in the center of objects and weaker and diffuse on the edges," said Oleg Ruchayskiy, one of the researchers, in a news release.


http://www.scienceworldreport.com...

Thoughts?

If they can expand this to more examples it seems it would be quite compelling. They can predict where dark matter is via gravitational lensing, so they just need to look there to see if the signal is consistent with them.

Easier said than done...

They would not need to predict where dark matter is, they would just build more sensitive telescopes that pick up on this signal and would use the quantity of the signal to extrapolate the quantity of dark matter.

They said in this press release that the quantity of signals they detected was heavy in the center and less heavy at the edges as one would expect.

We just need validation of the experiment to ensure it is reliable and valid. Secondly, we need more investigation to rule any other possibilities that may cause this signal. Right now it is only thought to be dark matter, but after they release the data something always comes up.

Regardless this is an amazing discovery. I don't think anyone is surprised, but it is most excellent to begin to move from theory to measurement.
Envisage
Posts: 3,646
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12/12/2014 11:32:53 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/12/2014 11:22:23 AM, slo1 wrote:
At 12/12/2014 10:25:02 AM, Envisage wrote:
At 12/12/2014 9:10:01 AM, Subutai wrote:
Dark matter has often been accused of being ad hoc by its detractors, simply explaining what we can't explain. However, scientists have found much needed hard evidence for the existence of dark matter:

One group of scientists detected it by analyzing X-rays emitted by two celestial objects, the Perseus galaxy cluster and the Andromeda galaxy. After collecting thousands of signals from ESA's XMM-Newton telescope and eliminating all of those coming from known particles and atoms, the scientists found an anomaly that caught their attention.

The signal appears as a weak, atypical photon emission that could not be attributed to any known form of matter.

"The signal's distribution within the galaxy corresponds exactly to what we were expecting with dark matter, that is, concentrated and intense in the center of objects and weaker and diffuse on the edges," said Oleg Ruchayskiy, one of the researchers, in a news release.


http://www.scienceworldreport.com...

Thoughts?

If they can expand this to more examples it seems it would be quite compelling. They can predict where dark matter is via gravitational lensing, so they just need to look there to see if the signal is consistent with them.

Easier said than done...

They would not need to predict where dark matter is, they would just build more sensitive telescopes that pick up on this signal and would use the quantity of the signal to extrapolate the quantity of dark matter.

They are making the assumption that this signal = dark matter's signature/signal (like certain absorption lines are Hydrogen signals). We want to firmly establish this link first.

They said in this press release that the quantity of signals they detected was heavy in the center and less heavy at the edges as one would expect.

We just need validation of the experiment to ensure it is reliable and valid. Secondly, we need more investigation to rule any other possibilities that may cause this signal.

Exactly. Otherwise it would be an argument form ignorance to just say "we don't know what could have caused that signal, therefore dark matter", you need to positivly conenct the two. And one way is to predict where the dark matter is (via. lensing) or via models of spinning galaxies, etc.

Right now it is only thought to be dark matter, but after they release the data something always comes up.

Regardless this is an amazing discovery. I don't think anyone is surprised, but it is most excellent to begin to move from theory to measurement.

I am surprised. I still have a strong suspicion that Dark Matter simply does not interact with baryonic matter whatsoever (except via. gravity). Neutrinos are very close to what we would expect of dark matter already since they only barely interact via. the weak nuclear force, they were and still are a possible (albeit somewhat absurd now) candidate for Dark Matter. If that was the case then our only chance of detecting it directly would probably be via. creating it (measuring an energy deficit in partricle accellerators, etc.).