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More than colorful imagination...

Lukas8
Posts: 31
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12/15/2014 8:59:01 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I have a question. Our eyes can see L= ca. 350-700nm (the colors of the rainbow). So we cant see infra-red or ultra-violet. But is it possible that our brain, could imagine these (invisible) colours? I mean, if we somehow could imagine the colour on the L= 50nm. And if not, would there be a possibility that we would send fake nerve signals from a machine to resemble the invisible colour? Since other animals see different colours, like bee"s see ultra-violet. Isn't it depending on the light sensor organ?

--L stands for Lambda, but I cant write it.--
slo1
Posts: 4,318
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12/15/2014 11:14:36 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 8:59:01 AM, Lukas8 wrote:
I have a question. Our eyes can see L= ca. 350-700nm (the colors of the rainbow). So we cant see infra-red or ultra-violet. But is it possible that our brain, could imagine these (invisible) colours? I mean, if we somehow could imagine the colour on the L= 50nm. And if not, would there be a possibility that we would send fake nerve signals from a machine to resemble the invisible colour? Since other animals see different colours, like bee"s see ultra-violet. Isn't it depending on the light sensor organ?

--L stands for Lambda, but I cant write it.--

Two things:

1. since nothing structurally in the eye can detect the wave lengths of infra red or ultra violet it would be like imagining purple elephants. Imagining it is a different thing than your brain interpreting a bio-electric signal it receives.

2. Imagine we genetically engineered some structure in the eye that could send a signal when ultra violet light hit it. One would need some neural pathways set up so it is distinct in nature to differentiate it from other colors, which are just RGB combinations.

Too many unknowns to even predict what would happen. Are you extending the red and blue cones to detect ulta violet and infra red? Are you creating a 4th or 5th type of cone (that could get interesting).

Since the brain has no such history of accepting such signals how would it process and interpret the signals?
Such
Posts: 1,110
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12/17/2014 11:34:24 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 8:59:01 AM, Lukas8 wrote:
I have a question. Our eyes can see L= ca. 350-700nm (the colors of the rainbow). So we cant see infra-red or ultra-violet. But is it possible that our brain, could imagine these (invisible) colours? I mean, if we somehow could imagine the colour on the L= 50nm. And if not, would there be a possibility that we would send fake nerve signals from a machine to resemble the invisible colour? Since other animals see different colours, like bee"s see ultra-violet. Isn't it depending on the light sensor organ?

--L stands for Lambda, but I cant write it.--

Colors are our brain's interpretation of light waves. Therefore, it would require an input of a given brain wave in order to interpret it so that we have a conception of what that brain wave it, what is denotes in the physical world, and how it translates into color.

But, I'm sure we could imagine it -- it would just continue into the spectrum of red and violent, in the same way that our hearing spectrum continues into highs and lows. The problem is the same with both interpretations, though -- would either have any meaning? If the high end of pitches just got higher, would it contribute anything to what we hear? Likely not, which is why our spectrum of hearing ends where it does.

I'd say the same for color. If the spectrum continued, it wouldn't add a damn thing to what we see. It would just be a deeper shade of purple or red, and really, who cares?

Not evolution, and not humanity. We would need to completely reconfigure how we interpret light in order for it to have any meaning whatsoever.

Except when it comes to negative space.

I feel as though reaching out into spectrums that we can't interpret adds to our ability to express ourselves artistically through these spectrums. Wouldn't you agree?

I mean, I think that a sound that fades through rising or lowering to a point that we can't interpret it would have a greater impact than those that need to rely on artificial means of going beyond our reach, like volume, saturation, or exposure.

Seems as though it would result in some pretty interesting, more dynamic, more interesting compositions. Just a thought.
Mhykiel
Posts: 5,987
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12/17/2014 5:40:52 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 8:59:01 AM, Lukas8 wrote:
I have a question. Our eyes can see L= ca. 350-700nm (the colors of the rainbow). So we cant see infra-red or ultra-violet. But is it possible that our brain, could imagine these (invisible) colours? I mean, if we somehow could imagine the colour on the L= 50nm. And if not, would there be a possibility that we would send fake nerve signals from a machine to resemble the invisible colour? Since other animals see different colours, like bee"s see ultra-violet. Isn't it depending on the light sensor organ?

--L stands for Lambda, but I cant write it.--

Aphakic people are reported to be able to see ultraviolet wavelengths (400"300 nm) that are normally excluded by the lens. They perceive this light as whitish blue or whitish violet. This is probably because all three of the eye's color receptors, the blue more than the others, are stimulated when such a person sees ultraviolet wavelengths. Some animals have a fourth color receptor for ultraviolet wavelengths (see tetrachromacy) and see the near ultraviolet as an extra primary color. Aphakia might have had an effect on the colors perceived by artist Claude Monet, who had cataract surgery in 1923.

http://en.wikipedia.org...