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One Electron Hypothesis

tabularasa
Posts: 200
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12/20/2014 1:02:11 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Can someone smarter than me please explain the one electron hypothesis? Reading about it is very difficult, since I do not have a physics background. Thanks in advance!

I should say, that you needn't be smarter than me to post an answer...you only need to be smarter than me in the area of physics!
1. I already googled it.

2. Give me an argument. Spell it out. "You're wrong," is not an argument.
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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12/20/2014 7:07:38 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/20/2014 1:02:11 PM, tabularasa wrote:
Can someone smarter than me please explain the one electron hypothesis? Reading about it is very difficult, since I do not have a physics background. Thanks in advance!

I should say, that you needn't be smarter than me to post an answer...you only need to be smarter than me in the area of physics!

It is the belief that there is really only one electron that occupies a single, massive world line. This world line is only one line, but is completely knotted up in space time, going both forward and backwards in time (that is why we seem to see more than one electron at a time).

A world line is a path that an object takes in 4-dimensional spacetime. How a single knotted world line could appear to be countless electrons can be hard to imagine. I presume you are familiar with multi-valued functions. Most high school algebra hates them and restricts them. Like Y = x^(1/2), they will typically only show the positive values, though negative values exist (but teachers don't like the "more than 1 answer for a question" stuff).

Think of it this way. You have a graph that has a figure 8 on it. Let's say the X axis represents time, and the Y is the position. As we go forward with time, there is nothing before we hit the edge of the figure 8. Once we do, it seems to start at 2 points (the very left of the top half and the bottom half). As we continue to go left in time, it seems like there are 4 points moving. The Top point appears to go up, then come back down where it collides with another point and disappears. The second point came down from the same point as the top and passes by another point and keeps going down. The third point came up from the bottom and passed the second point before colliding and disappearing. The bottom point goes down before coming back up and colliding with the second point.

So we see 4 points come out of 2 places and collide and disappear as we go through time. But there was only 1 path that made these 4 points. If you had a massive knot, it may seem like countless points because of that one line.

Technically, if the universe did begin at a single point (as in, there was nothing of this universe before that point) and ultimately ends at a single point, all electrons will be annihilated. Since every election has a beginning and ending with a positron, all the electrons' world paths will be linked together, giving the appearance of a large knotted path (though it is entirely possible based on how all the chips fall that it is several closed world paths that are all knotted together).

Hope that helps.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
tabularasa
Posts: 200
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12/21/2014 3:29:35 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/20/2014 7:07:38 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 12/20/2014 1:02:11 PM, tabularasa wrote:
Can someone smarter than me please explain the one electron hypothesis? Reading about it is very difficult, since I do not have a physics background. Thanks in advance!

I should say, that you needn't be smarter than me to post an answer...you only need to be smarter than me in the area of physics!

It is the belief that there is really only one electron that occupies a single, massive world line. This world line is only one line, but is completely knotted up in space time, going both forward and backwards in time (that is why we seem to see more than one electron at a time).

A world line is a path that an object takes in 4-dimensional spacetime. How a single knotted world line could appear to be countless electrons can be hard to imagine. I presume you are familiar with multi-valued functions. Most high school algebra hates them and restricts them. Like Y = x^(1/2), they will typically only show the positive values, though negative values exist (but teachers don't like the "more than 1 answer for a question" stuff).

Think of it this way. You have a graph that has a figure 8 on it. Let's say the X axis represents time, and the Y is the position. As we go forward with time, there is nothing before we hit the edge of the figure 8. Once we do, it seems to start at 2 points (the very left of the top half and the bottom half). As we continue to go left in time, it seems like there are 4 points moving. The Top point appears to go up, then come back down where it collides with another point and disappears. The second point came down from the same point as the top and passes by another point and keeps going down. The third point came up from the bottom and passed the second point before colliding and disappearing. The bottom point goes down before coming back up and colliding with the second point.

So we see 4 points come out of 2 places and collide and disappear as we go through time. But there was only 1 path that made these 4 points. If you had a massive knot, it may seem like countless points because of that one line.

Technically, if the universe did begin at a single point (as in, there was nothing of this universe before that point) and ultimately ends at a single point, all electrons will be annihilated. Since every election has a beginning and ending with a positron, all the electrons' world paths will be linked together, giving the appearance of a large knotted path (though it is entirely possible based on how all the chips fall that it is several closed world paths that are all knotted together).

Hope that helps.

Yes, that helps. I drew the diagram. I am struggling with the empirical application. As I understand it, the OEH is does not offend our understanding of the universe, but also is not necessarily the only explanation. Am I right?
1. I already googled it.

2. Give me an argument. Spell it out. "You're wrong," is not an argument.
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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12/22/2014 7:47:19 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/21/2014 3:29:35 PM, tabularasa wrote:
At 12/20/2014 7:07:38 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 12/20/2014 1:02:11 PM, tabularasa wrote:
Can someone smarter than me please explain the one electron hypothesis? Reading about it is very difficult, since I do not have a physics background. Thanks in advance!

I should say, that you needn't be smarter than me to post an answer...you only need to be smarter than me in the area of physics!

It is the belief that there is really only one electron that occupies a single, massive world line. This world line is only one line, but is completely knotted up in space time, going both forward and backwards in time (that is why we seem to see more than one electron at a time).

A world line is a path that an object takes in 4-dimensional spacetime. How a single knotted world line could appear to be countless electrons can be hard to imagine. I presume you are familiar with multi-valued functions. Most high school algebra hates them and restricts them. Like Y = x^(1/2), they will typically only show the positive values, though negative values exist (but teachers don't like the "more than 1 answer for a question" stuff).

Think of it this way. You have a graph that has a figure 8 on it. Let's say the X axis represents time, and the Y is the position. As we go forward with time, there is nothing before we hit the edge of the figure 8. Once we do, it seems to start at 2 points (the very left of the top half and the bottom half). As we continue to go left in time, it seems like there are 4 points moving. The Top point appears to go up, then come back down where it collides with another point and disappears. The second point came down from the same point as the top and passes by another point and keeps going down. The third point came up from the bottom and passed the second point before colliding and disappearing. The bottom point goes down before coming back up and colliding with the second point.

So we see 4 points come out of 2 places and collide and disappear as we go through time. But there was only 1 path that made these 4 points. If you had a massive knot, it may seem like countless points because of that one line.

Technically, if the universe did begin at a single point (as in, there was nothing of this universe before that point) and ultimately ends at a single point, all electrons will be annihilated. Since every election has a beginning and ending with a positron, all the electrons' world paths will be linked together, giving the appearance of a large knotted path (though it is entirely possible based on how all the chips fall that it is several closed world paths that are all knotted together).

Hope that helps.

Yes, that helps. I drew the diagram. I am struggling with the empirical application. As I understand it, the OEH is does not offend our understanding of the universe, but also is not necessarily the only explanation. Am I right?

That is correct. It theoretically works because where there are direction changes (so like on the figure 8) along the time axis of spacetime, it is one line, but to us, it will appear as either the creation or annihilation (depending on the direction of the change).

Though only thing that I'm not sure about would be if it really lines up with conservation of energy and momentum. Since that would imply that every time the election changes direction in space time is because it ran into another particle. I also don't see how this could work without implying pure determinism.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
tabularasa
Posts: 200
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12/23/2014 6:08:07 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/22/2014 7:47:19 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 12/21/2014 3:29:35 PM, tabularasa wrote:
At 12/20/2014 7:07:38 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 12/20/2014 1:02:11 PM, tabularasa wrote:
Can someone smarter than me please explain the one electron hypothesis? Reading about it is very difficult, since I do not have a physics background. Thanks in advance!

I should say, that you needn't be smarter than me to post an answer...you only need to be smarter than me in the area of physics!

It is the belief that there is really only one electron that occupies a single, massive world line. This world line is only one line, but is completely knotted up in space time, going both forward and backwards in time (that is why we seem to see more than one electron at a time).

A world line is a path that an object takes in 4-dimensional spacetime. How a single knotted world line could appear to be countless electrons can be hard to imagine. I presume you are familiar with multi-valued functions. Most high school algebra hates them and restricts them. Like Y = x^(1/2), they will typically only show the positive values, though negative values exist (but teachers don't like the "more than 1 answer for a question" stuff).

Think of it this way. You have a graph that has a figure 8 on it. Let's say the X axis represents time, and the Y is the position. As we go forward with time, there is nothing before we hit the edge of the figure 8. Once we do, it seems to start at 2 points (the very left of the top half and the bottom half). As we continue to go left in time, it seems like there are 4 points moving. The Top point appears to go up, then come back down where it collides with another point and disappears. The second point came down from the same point as the top and passes by another point and keeps going down. The third point came up from the bottom and passed the second point before colliding and disappearing. The bottom point goes down before coming back up and colliding with the second point.

So we see 4 points come out of 2 places and collide and disappear as we go through time. But there was only 1 path that made these 4 points. If you had a massive knot, it may seem like countless points because of that one line.

Technically, if the universe did begin at a single point (as in, there was nothing of this universe before that point) and ultimately ends at a single point, all electrons will be annihilated. Since every election has a beginning and ending with a positron, all the electrons' world paths will be linked together, giving the appearance of a large knotted path (though it is entirely possible based on how all the chips fall that it is several closed world paths that are all knotted together).

Hope that helps.

Yes, that helps. I drew the diagram. I am struggling with the empirical application. As I understand it, the OEH is does not offend our understanding of the universe, but also is not necessarily the only explanation. Am I right?

That is correct. It theoretically works because where there are direction changes (so like on the figure 8) along the time axis of spacetime, it is one line, but to us, it will appear as either the creation or annihilation (depending on the direction of the change).

Though only thing that I'm not sure about would be if it really lines up with conservation of energy and momentum. Since that would imply that every time the election changes direction in space time is because it ran into another particle. I also don't see how this could work without implying pure determinism.

I don't see how the law of conservation of mass and energy interlocks with pure determinism in the scenario of two electrons colliding. Care to elaborate?
1. I already googled it.

2. Give me an argument. Spell it out. "You're wrong," is not an argument.