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Cloned Cows

Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
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8/6/2010 11:15:35 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
There is a bit of a fuss at the moment in the UK over the issue of beef and milk from the offspring of clones has entering the foodchain.
http://www.ft.com...

Why should we care?
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
I-am-a-panda
Posts: 15,380
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8/6/2010 11:26:19 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/6/2010 11:15:35 AM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
There is a bit of a fuss at the moment in the UK over the issue of beef and milk from the offspring of clones has entering the foodchain.
http://www.ft.com...

Why should we care?

"FT.com articles are only available to registered users and subscribers."

Also, cool grammar bro.

"The RSPCA said that in addition to ethical concerns, the [cloned] animals often have breathing problems, tumors, liver defects, or other abnormalities. " - http://m.theepochtimes.com...
Pizza. I have enormous respect for Pizza.
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
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8/6/2010 11:42:39 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/6/2010 11:26:19 AM, I-am-a-panda wrote:
At 8/6/2010 11:15:35 AM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
There is a bit of a fuss at the moment in the UK over the issue of beef and milk from the offspring of clones has entering the foodchain.
http://www.ft.com...

Why should we care?

"FT.com articles are only available to registered users and subscribers."

Also, cool grammar bro.

"The RSPCA said that in addition to ethical concerns, the [cloned] animals often have breathing problems, tumors, liver defects, or other abnormalities. " - http://m.theepochtimes.com...

Strange, I have the whole article.

PS: Oh noes, i made a mistake...

Hunt for descendants of cloned cattle
By Fiona Harvey, Environment Correspondent

Published: August 4 2010 22:14 | Last updated: August 5 2010 12:19

A hunt is on in the UK for the scores of descendants of cloned cattle, which are known to be on farms but whose whereabouts are not held on a register.

Embryos from cloned cows were imported to the UK from the US and used for breeding – a process which is legal and there are likely to be more than 100 of these third generation clones.

EDITOR'S CHOICE
Move to allow EU ban on GM crops - Jun-04.EU impasse on GM foods close to resolution - Jul-13.Genetically modified potato wins EU approval - Mar-02.GM crops increased 7% in 2009 - Feb-23.Call for ‘green revolution' in India - Feb-09.GM food on agenda as Benn outlines strategy - Jan-05..Meat and milk from the animals is safe to eat, according to the government and scientists, but should not have been released into the food chain without a special licence.

The uproar over cloning has arisen because of a grey area in the law: although it is legal to import cloned animals, their embryos, semen and offspring, and farmers who do so are under no obligation to report their activities to the authorities, the farmers are not allowed to sell products from these animals – such as meat or milk – for human consumption without seeking permission. No such permission has yet been granted.

Meat from at least two bulls that were the offspring of cloned animals has already entered the food chain, the Food Standards Agency has said, as it struggled to trace other cloned animals in the UK.

The discovery arose from an investigation started by the agency when it emerged that milk from the offspring of at least one cloned cow could have been sold for human consumption.

All of the calves born in the UK from eight embryos harvested from a cloned cow in the US had been traced, the agency said. However, as farmers rearing cloned animals or their offspring have no obligation to report their activities to the government, neither the agency nor the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs could say whether these eight were the only second generation cloned cattle in the country.

Although selling products from cloned animals and their offspring is not legal without permission from the FSA, farmers are free to bring such animals, or their embryos or semen, into the country.

One farmer came forward on Wednesday to admit he had bought and raised the offspring of cloned cattle from the US, meat from one of which had entered the food chain. But he said he had "acted in good faith", had been "fully compliant with the relevant authorities' wishes" and believed he was compliant with the law.

Scientists tried to calm public fears over whether milk and meat from cloned cattle could pose a risk to public health.

Prof Robin Lovell-Badge, head of stem cell biology and developmental genetics at the National Institute for Medical Research, compared eating cloned animals to eating plants grown from cuttings.

He said: "I can see no more danger in eating beef from the offspring of a cloned bull or cow, or of the clones themselves, than eating beef from cattle bred in conventional ways."

Andrew George, who chairs the Lib Dems' Defra committee, said the public should not be concerned about the health implications. "There won't be any kind of Frankenstein impact," he said. But he thought the public deserved to make an informed choice about their food.

In many countries cloned animals are accepted as posing no risk to health. In 2001, the US Food and Drug Administration told food companies to ensure no products from cloned animal could enter the food chain and conducted an analysis of cloning. In January 2008 the FDA concluded that "meat and milk from cow, pig, and goat clones and the offspring of any animal clones are as safe as food we eat every day".

Brendan Curran, a geneticist from Queen Mary, University of London, said: "There is no reason why the situation should be any different in the UK."
.Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2010. You may share using our article tools. Please don't cut articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
tBoonePickens
Posts: 3,266
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8/6/2010 1:16:51 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 8/6/2010 11:15:35 AM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
There is a bit of a fuss at the moment in the UK over the issue of beef and milk from the offspring of clones has entering the foodchain.
http://www.ft.com...

Why should we care?

I don't see anything "ethical" about it, do you? My only concern is that we don't know about the side effects (if any vs non-cloned cows.) I like being on top of the food chain!
WOS
: At 10/3/2012 4:28:52 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
: Without nothing existing, you couldn't have something.