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Neurogenesis in humans - is it real?

Adam_Godzilla
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5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.
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dee-em
Posts: 6,456
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5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]
Adam_Godzilla
Posts: 2,487
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5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.
New episode of OUTSIDERS: http://www.debate.org...
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UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.
Adam_Godzilla
Posts: 2,487
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5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.
New episode of OUTSIDERS: http://www.debate.org...
Episode 4 - They walk among us
RuvDraba
Posts: 6,033
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5/25/2015 9:41:10 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Nuclear bomb tests reveal brain regeneration in humans
New Scientist 10 Jun 2013

Nuclear bomb tests carried out during the cold war have had an unexpected benefit.

A radioactive carbon isotope expelled by the blasts has been used to date the age of adult human brain cells, providing the first definitive evidence that we generate new brain cells throughout our lives. The study also provides the first model of the dynamics of the process, showing that the regeneration of neurons does not drop off with age as sharply as expected.

[http://www.newscientist.com...]

I hope that may be useful, Adam.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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5/25/2015 10:28:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.

What I was trying to say was that neurogenesis does not imply neuron regeneration. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus has nothing to do with regeneration or recovery from injury, but instead is for memory encoding with highly similar day-to-day memories which have important minor differences.
Adam_Godzilla
Posts: 2,487
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5/26/2015 4:14:50 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/25/2015 10:28:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.

What I was trying to say was that neurogenesis does not imply neuron regeneration. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus has nothing to do with regeneration or recovery from injury, but instead is for memory encoding with highly similar day-to-day memories which have important minor differences.

I believe what you're describing is the function of the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is the reproduction of new neurons as stated across medical sites and here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

From that link, I found out that in fact, neurogenesis does occur in the hippocampus. Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself.
New episode of OUTSIDERS: http://www.debate.org...
Episode 4 - They walk among us
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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5/26/2015 7:41:15 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/26/2015 4:14:50 AM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 10:28:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.

What I was trying to say was that neurogenesis does not imply neuron regeneration. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus has nothing to do with regeneration or recovery from injury, but instead is for memory encoding with highly similar day-to-day memories which have important minor differences.

I believe what you're describing is the function of the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is the reproduction of new neurons as stated across medical sites and here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

From that link, I found out that in fact, neurogenesis does occur in the hippocampus. Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself.

What I'm saying is that you shouldn't confuse neurogenesis with neural regeneration. They are not the same thing. Generation is not regeneration.

The hippocampus is the only place adult neurogenesis is confirmed in humans, and its function is to support memory encoding, not to repair injury.

"Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself."

I don't know what you mean by that last sentence. Syntactically it says that neurogenesis helps better encode memories due to neural regeneration, but I don't think that's what you meant.
Adam_Godzilla
Posts: 2,487
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5/26/2015 6:14:25 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/26/2015 7:41:15 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 4:14:50 AM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 10:28:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.

What I was trying to say was that neurogenesis does not imply neuron regeneration. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus has nothing to do with regeneration or recovery from injury, but instead is for memory encoding with highly similar day-to-day memories which have important minor differences.

I believe what you're describing is the function of the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is the reproduction of new neurons as stated across medical sites and here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

From that link, I found out that in fact, neurogenesis does occur in the hippocampus. Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself.

What I'm saying is that you shouldn't confuse neurogenesis with neural regeneration. They are not the same thing. Generation is not regeneration.

The hippocampus is the only place adult neurogenesis is confirmed in humans, and its function is to support memory encoding, not to repair injury.

"Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself."

I don't know what you mean by that last sentence. Syntactically it says that neurogenesis helps better encode memories due to neural regeneration, but I don't think that's what you meant.

So what you're saying is that neural regeneration and neurogenesis are two different processes? I looked it up and it seems neural regenration is more to neural connection repairs while neurogenesis is individual neuron cell reproduction. Is this what you mean?
New episode of OUTSIDERS: http://www.debate.org...
Episode 4 - They walk among us
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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5/26/2015 7:47:05 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/26/2015 6:14:25 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:41:15 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 4:14:50 AM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 10:28:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.

What I was trying to say was that neurogenesis does not imply neuron regeneration. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus has nothing to do with regeneration or recovery from injury, but instead is for memory encoding with highly similar day-to-day memories which have important minor differences.

I believe what you're describing is the function of the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is the reproduction of new neurons as stated across medical sites and here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

From that link, I found out that in fact, neurogenesis does occur in the hippocampus. Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself.

What I'm saying is that you shouldn't confuse neurogenesis with neural regeneration. They are not the same thing. Generation is not regeneration.

The hippocampus is the only place adult neurogenesis is confirmed in humans, and its function is to support memory encoding, not to repair injury.

"Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself."

I don't know what you mean by that last sentence. Syntactically it says that neurogenesis helps better encode memories due to neural regeneration, but I don't think that's what you meant.

So what you're saying is that neural regeneration and neurogenesis are two different processes? I looked it up and it seems neural regenration is more to neural connection repairs while neurogenesis is individual neuron cell reproduction. Is this what you mean?

Yes, they are different. Neural regeneration is the pair of neural connections and also the replacement of lost neurons, whereas neurogenesis is the birth of new neurons. So there is overlap in the concepts, hypothetically, but for adults, there probably isn't neurogenesis in neural regeneration.

I hope that makes it more clear.
Adam_Godzilla
Posts: 2,487
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5/26/2015 9:22:49 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/26/2015 7:47:05 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 6:14:25 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:41:15 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 4:14:50 AM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 10:28:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.

What I was trying to say was that neurogenesis does not imply neuron regeneration. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus has nothing to do with regeneration or recovery from injury, but instead is for memory encoding with highly similar day-to-day memories which have important minor differences.

I believe what you're describing is the function of the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is the reproduction of new neurons as stated across medical sites and here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

From that link, I found out that in fact, neurogenesis does occur in the hippocampus. Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself.

What I'm saying is that you shouldn't confuse neurogenesis with neural regeneration. They are not the same thing. Generation is not regeneration.

The hippocampus is the only place adult neurogenesis is confirmed in humans, and its function is to support memory encoding, not to repair injury.

"Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself."

I don't know what you mean by that last sentence. Syntactically it says that neurogenesis helps better encode memories due to neural regeneration, but I don't think that's what you meant.

So what you're saying is that neural regeneration and neurogenesis are two different processes? I looked it up and it seems neural regenration is more to neural connection repairs while neurogenesis is individual neuron cell reproduction. Is this what you mean?

Yes, they are different. Neural regeneration is the pair of neural connections and also the replacement of lost neurons, whereas neurogenesis is the birth of new neurons. So there is overlap in the concepts, hypothetically, but for adults, there probably isn't neurogenesis in neural regeneration.

I hope that makes it more clear.

It does, thank you.
New episode of OUTSIDERS: http://www.debate.org...
Episode 4 - They walk among us
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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5/26/2015 9:27:07 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/26/2015 9:22:49 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:47:05 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 6:14:25 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:41:15 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 4:14:50 AM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 10:28:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.

What I was trying to say was that neurogenesis does not imply neuron regeneration. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus has nothing to do with regeneration or recovery from injury, but instead is for memory encoding with highly similar day-to-day memories which have important minor differences.

I believe what you're describing is the function of the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is the reproduction of new neurons as stated across medical sites and here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

From that link, I found out that in fact, neurogenesis does occur in the hippocampus. Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself.

What I'm saying is that you shouldn't confuse neurogenesis with neural regeneration. They are not the same thing. Generation is not regeneration.

The hippocampus is the only place adult neurogenesis is confirmed in humans, and its function is to support memory encoding, not to repair injury.

"Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself."

I don't know what you mean by that last sentence. Syntactically it says that neurogenesis helps better encode memories due to neural regeneration, but I don't think that's what you meant.

So what you're saying is that neural regeneration and neurogenesis are two different processes? I looked it up and it seems neural regenration is more to neural connection repairs while neurogenesis is individual neuron cell reproduction. Is this what you mean?

Yes, they are different. Neural regeneration is the pair of neural connections and also the replacement of lost neurons, whereas neurogenesis is the birth of new neurons. So there is overlap in the concepts, hypothetically, but for adults, there probably isn't neurogenesis in neural regeneration.

I hope that makes it more clear.

It does, thank you.

As what might be a fitting conclusion to this thread, I am interested to know what your views are on the topic now.

Did you get a chance to read from some of the scientists I mentioned?
Adam_Godzilla
Posts: 2,487
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5/26/2015 9:41:31 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/26/2015 9:27:07 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:22:49 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:47:05 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 6:14:25 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:41:15 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 4:14:50 AM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 10:28:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.

What I was trying to say was that neurogenesis does not imply neuron regeneration. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus has nothing to do with regeneration or recovery from injury, but instead is for memory encoding with highly similar day-to-day memories which have important minor differences.

I believe what you're describing is the function of the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is the reproduction of new neurons as stated across medical sites and here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

From that link, I found out that in fact, neurogenesis does occur in the hippocampus. Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself.

What I'm saying is that you shouldn't confuse neurogenesis with neural regeneration. They are not the same thing. Generation is not regeneration.

The hippocampus is the only place adult neurogenesis is confirmed in humans, and its function is to support memory encoding, not to repair injury.

"Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself."

I don't know what you mean by that last sentence. Syntactically it says that neurogenesis helps better encode memories due to neural regeneration, but I don't think that's what you meant.

So what you're saying is that neural regeneration and neurogenesis are two different processes? I looked it up and it seems neural regenration is more to neural connection repairs while neurogenesis is individual neuron cell reproduction. Is this what you mean?

Yes, they are different. Neural regeneration is the pair of neural connections and also the replacement of lost neurons, whereas neurogenesis is the birth of new neurons. So there is overlap in the concepts, hypothetically, but for adults, there probably isn't neurogenesis in neural regeneration.

I hope that makes it more clear.

It does, thank you.

As what might be a fitting conclusion to this thread, I am interested to know what your views are on the topic now.

I'm convinced it occurs now. However, from Suzanna Becker's article, she says; "that a continual turnover of neurons in the DG could contribute to the development of event-unique memory traces that act to reduce interference between highly similar inputs". - http://www.researchgate.net...

So I'm confused as to why you say that no neural reproduction occurs in the adult brain when her article states so. She says, "results support the hypothesis that adult-born neurons in the DG contribute to the orthogonalization of incoming information."

Did you get a chance to read from some of the scientists I mentioned?
Only abstracts at the moment.
New episode of OUTSIDERS: http://www.debate.org...
Episode 4 - They walk among us
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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5/26/2015 10:48:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/26/2015 9:41:31 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:27:07 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:22:49 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:47:05 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 6:14:25 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:41:15 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 4:14:50 AM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 10:28:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.

What I was trying to say was that neurogenesis does not imply neuron regeneration. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus has nothing to do with regeneration or recovery from injury, but instead is for memory encoding with highly similar day-to-day memories which have important minor differences.

I believe what you're describing is the function of the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is the reproduction of new neurons as stated across medical sites and here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

From that link, I found out that in fact, neurogenesis does occur in the hippocampus. Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself.

What I'm saying is that you shouldn't confuse neurogenesis with neural regeneration. They are not the same thing. Generation is not regeneration.

The hippocampus is the only place adult neurogenesis is confirmed in humans, and its function is to support memory encoding, not to repair injury.

"Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself."

I don't know what you mean by that last sentence. Syntactically it says that neurogenesis helps better encode memories due to neural regeneration, but I don't think that's what you meant.

So what you're saying is that neural regeneration and neurogenesis are two different processes? I looked it up and it seems neural regenration is more to neural connection repairs while neurogenesis is individual neuron cell reproduction. Is this what you mean?

Yes, they are different. Neural regeneration is the pair of neural connections and also the replacement of lost neurons, whereas neurogenesis is the birth of new neurons. So there is overlap in the concepts, hypothetically, but for adults, there probably isn't neurogenesis in neural regeneration.

I hope that makes it more clear.

It does, thank you.

As what might be a fitting conclusion to this thread, I am interested to know what your views are on the topic now.

I'm convinced it occurs now. However, from Suzanna Becker's article, she says; "that a continual turnover of neurons in the DG could contribute to the development of event-unique memory traces that act to reduce interference between highly similar inputs". - http://www.researchgate.net...

So I'm confused as to why you say that no neural reproduction occurs in the adult brain when her article states so. She says, "results support the hypothesis that adult-born neurons in the DG contribute to the orthogonalization of incoming information."

Did you get a chance to read from some of the scientists I mentioned?
Only abstracts at the moment.

Ah, because reproduction implies that they are replacing or restoring functionality of previous neurons, but that isn't the case with neurogenesis. Just a technicality in terms really. While neurons are dying off in the dentate gyrus, the new neurons aren't there to replace the functions of the old neurons, but to encode for new memories which are more relevant (by making them more separable from highly similar memories).

That was a pretty good paper that came out of that lab. Nick has another paper coming out soon, and Suzanna is writing up a book chapter on hippocampal neurogenesis that should be coming out soon (I'll ask about the title of the book), so you may want to take a look at those when they're available, if you're still interested in the topic.
Adam_Godzilla
Posts: 2,487
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5/27/2015 12:19:21 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/26/2015 10:48:44 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:41:31 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:27:07 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:22:49 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:47:05 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 6:14:25 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:41:15 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 4:14:50 AM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 10:28:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:24:59 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 8:16:10 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:45:27 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:36:18 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

It's still contentious but recent research seems to indicate it occurs in humans:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

By that time, Shirley Bayer[15][16] (and Michael Kaplan) again showed that adult neurogenesis exists in mammals (rats), and Nottebohm showed the same phenomenon in birds[17] sparking renewed interest in the topic. Studies in the 1990s[18][19] finally put research on adult neurogenesis into a mainstream pursuit. Also in the early 1990s hippocampal neurogenesis was demonstrated in non-human primates and humans.[20][21] More recently, neurogenesis in the cerebellum of adult rabbits has also been characterized.[22]

Still skeptical. I'm still waiting for textbook proof but I don't think that's going to happen anytime soon.

What is textbook proof?

Look into the works of Neil Burgess and Suzanna Becker, for example, who study human neurogenesis.

I'll look into it.

Just to be clear, neurogenesis doesn't imply tissue repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis facilitates memory encoding with reduced interference in the hippocampus and occurs throughout adult human life.

There hasn't been any undeniable proof of neuron regeneration in humans that i could find. It seems many news articles are claiming research into this is conclusive but in fact it's not. Although neurogenesis has been found in many animals, it hasn't been in humans except. I know neurogenesis can include glial cells as well but I'm wanting proof for nerve cell reproduction and textbooks rewriting the common belief that nerve cells don't regenerate.

What I was trying to say was that neurogenesis does not imply neuron regeneration. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus has nothing to do with regeneration or recovery from injury, but instead is for memory encoding with highly similar day-to-day memories which have important minor differences.

I believe what you're describing is the function of the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is the reproduction of new neurons as stated across medical sites and here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

From that link, I found out that in fact, neurogenesis does occur in the hippocampus. Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself.

What I'm saying is that you shouldn't confuse neurogenesis with neural regeneration. They are not the same thing. Generation is not regeneration.

The hippocampus is the only place adult neurogenesis is confirmed in humans, and its function is to support memory encoding, not to repair injury.

"Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself."

I don't know what you mean by that last sentence. Syntactically it says that neurogenesis helps better encode memories due to neural regeneration, but I don't think that's what you meant.

So what you're saying is that neural regeneration and neurogenesis are two different processes? I looked it up and it seems neural regenration is more to neural connection repairs while neurogenesis is individual neuron cell reproduction. Is this what you mean?

Yes, they are different. Neural regeneration is the pair of neural connections and also the replacement of lost neurons, whereas neurogenesis is the birth of new neurons. So there is overlap in the concepts, hypothetically, but for adults, there probably isn't neurogenesis in neural regeneration.

I hope that makes it more clear.

It does, thank you.

As what might be a fitting conclusion to this thread, I am interested to know what your views are on the topic now.

I'm convinced it occurs now. However, from Suzanna Becker's article, she says; "that a continual turnover of neurons in the DG could contribute to the development of event-unique memory traces that act to reduce interference between highly similar inputs". - http://www.researchgate.net...

So I'm confused as to why you say that no neural reproduction occurs in the adult brain when her article states so. She says, "results support the hypothesis that adult-born neurons in the DG contribute to the orthogonalization of incoming information."

Did you get a chance to read from some of the scientists I mentioned?
Only abstracts at the moment.

Ah, because reproduction implies that they are replacing or restoring functionality of previous neurons, but that isn't the case with neurogenesis. Just a technicality in terms really. While neurons are dying off in the dentate gyrus, the new neurons aren't there to replace the functions of the old neurons, but to encode for new memories which are more relevant (by making them more separable from highly similar memories).

I see. Where do these new neurons come from? Wouldn't they come from old neuron cells?
That was a pretty good paper that came out of that lab. Nick has another paper coming out soon, and Suzanna is writing up a book chapter on hippocampal neurogenesis that should be coming out soon (I'll ask about the title of the book), so you may want to take a look at those when they're available, if you're still interested in the topic.

Sure, I'll look into it.
New episode of OUTSIDERS: http://www.debate.org...
Episode 4 - They walk among us
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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5/27/2015 8:47:01 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/27/2015 12:19:21 AM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 10:48:44 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:41:31 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:27:07 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:22:49 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:47:05 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 6:14:25 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:41:15 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:

What I'm saying is that you shouldn't confuse neurogenesis with neural regeneration. They are not the same thing. Generation is not regeneration.

The hippocampus is the only place adult neurogenesis is confirmed in humans, and its function is to support memory encoding, not to repair injury.

"Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself."

I don't know what you mean by that last sentence. Syntactically it says that neurogenesis helps better encode memories due to neural regeneration, but I don't think that's what you meant.

So what you're saying is that neural regeneration and neurogenesis are two different processes? I looked it up and it seems neural regenration is more to neural connection repairs while neurogenesis is individual neuron cell reproduction. Is this what you mean?

Yes, they are different. Neural regeneration is the pair of neural connections and also the replacement of lost neurons, whereas neurogenesis is the birth of new neurons. So there is overlap in the concepts, hypothetically, but for adults, there probably isn't neurogenesis in neural regeneration.

I hope that makes it more clear.

It does, thank you.

As what might be a fitting conclusion to this thread, I am interested to know what your views are on the topic now.

I'm convinced it occurs now. However, from Suzanna Becker's article, she says; "that a continual turnover of neurons in the DG could contribute to the development of event-unique memory traces that act to reduce interference between highly similar inputs". - http://www.researchgate.net...

So I'm confused as to why you say that no neural reproduction occurs in the adult brain when her article states so. She says, "results support the hypothesis that adult-born neurons in the DG contribute to the orthogonalization of incoming information."

Did you get a chance to read from some of the scientists I mentioned?
Only abstracts at the moment.

Ah, because reproduction implies that they are replacing or restoring functionality of previous neurons, but that isn't the case with neurogenesis. Just a technicality in terms really. While neurons are dying off in the dentate gyrus, the new neurons aren't there to replace the functions of the old neurons, but to encode for new memories which are more relevant (by making them more separable from highly similar memories).

I see. Where do these new neurons come from? Wouldn't they come from old neuron cells?
That was a pretty good paper that came out of that lab. Nick has another paper coming out soon, and Suzanna is writing up a book chapter on hippocampal neurogenesis that should be coming out soon (I'll ask about the title of the book), so you may want to take a look at those when they're available, if you're still interested in the topic.

Sure, I'll look into it.

From HG Kuhn, H Dickinson-Aonson, & FH Gage. Neurogenesis in the Dentate Gyrus of the Adult Rat: Age-Related Decrease of Neuronal Progenitor Proliferation. The Journal of Neuroscience, 16(6):2027-2022. 1996.

The process of neural genesis in the adult dentate gyrus can be
divided into three distinct phases. First, neural precursor cells that
reside at the border between the hilus and the granule cell layer
(GCL) undergo cell division. Early markers of this proliferation
are incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) or [3H]thymidine
into the DNA of dividing precursor cells and increased
immunoreactivity to the ccl1 cycle regulatory protein RB (the
retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product) and to the ccl1 cycledependent
kinase cdc2 (Okano et al., 1993). Second, newborn
cells begin to migrate into the GCL and extend neuronal processes.
This step is accompanied by expression of polysialylatedNCAM
(PSA-NCAM), the embryonic form of neural cell adhesion
molecule (Seki and Arai, 1993). The presence of PSANCAM
in the embryonic and adult brain is highly correlated with
neuronal precursor migration and differentiation (Chuong and
Edelman, 1984; Bonfanti et al., 1992; Ono et al., 1994; Rousselot
et al., 1994). In the adult hippocampus, PSA-NCAM is present in
cells that reside at the border between hilus and GCL, including
newborn granule cells (Seki and Arai, 1993). Third, the cells
integrate into the GCL and begin to express the neuronal marker
neuron-specific enolase (Cameron et al., 1993).


I hope that's a good start. Are you able to access this paper? http://www.jneurosci.org...
DizzyKnight
Posts: 19
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5/27/2015 5:05:57 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I think I should point out the distinction between neurogenesis and neuroregeneration. Neurogenesis is the generation of nerve cells from their stem cells and progenitor cells. Neuroregeneration, the repair and regrowth of nerve cells, is probably the right term for what we're discussing.

We often classify our nervous system into two parts, called the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). CNS refers to the brain and spinal chord, while the PNS refers to the nerve cells and glial cells outside the CNS (peripheral nerves for example).

Neuroregeneration in the PNS is very well documented. Nerves regrow significantly in the PNS. However in the CNS, the environment is not advantageous for regeneration, so they do not spontaneously regenerate after injury.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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5/27/2015 5:09:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/27/2015 5:05:57 PM, DizzyKnight wrote:
I think I should point out the distinction between neurogenesis and neuroregeneration. Neurogenesis is the generation of nerve cells from their stem cells and progenitor cells. Neuroregeneration, the repair and regrowth of nerve cells, is probably the right term for what we're discussing.

We often classify our nervous system into two parts, called the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). CNS refers to the brain and spinal chord, while the PNS refers to the nerve cells and glial cells outside the CNS (peripheral nerves for example).

Neuroregeneration in the PNS is very well documented. Nerves regrow significantly in the PNS. However in the CNS, the environment is not advantageous for regeneration, so they do not spontaneously regenerate after injury.

Thanks Dizzy. You're right. After re-reading the OP, it is probably meant to ask about neuroregeneration. But we should note that regeneration in the PNS is still extremely limited. It's certainly not enough to recover from paralysis in most cases.
DizzyKnight
Posts: 19
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5/27/2015 5:20:45 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
The regeneration capabilities of the PNS depends on the severity of the damage I think. There are three levels of nerve damage. On the lowest level, the nerve itself is not disconnected, but its signaling capabilities is hampered. On the second level, the nerve is damaged, but its surrounding connective tissues are not harmed. On the last level, both the nerve and its surrounding connective tissues and damaged. Recoveries from the first and second level are usually good. However, patients cannot recovery completely from the last level of nerve damage.

Many serious paralysis are due to damages to the spinal chord or the brain, which is classified as part of the CNS. The low regenerative capabilities of the CNS also explains why it is so hard to recover from paralysis.
Adam_Godzilla
Posts: 2,487
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5/27/2015 7:01:22 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/27/2015 5:20:45 PM, DizzyKnight wrote:
The regeneration capabilities of the PNS depends on the severity of the damage I think. There are three levels of nerve damage. On the lowest level, the nerve itself is not disconnected, but its signaling capabilities is hampered. On the second level, the nerve is damaged, but its surrounding connective tissues are not harmed. On the last level, both the nerve and its surrounding connective tissues and damaged. Recoveries from the first and second level are usually good. However, patients cannot recovery completely from the last level of nerve damage.

This is all very interesting. So how can the nerve cell be connected and have difficulties sending signals? Is this to do some sort of malnutrition, high imbalance of sodium and potassium levels? Or is it just damage to the axons in general?

Wouldn't a patient with disconnected nerve cells and damaged nerve cells be impossible to recover from? And what are your thoughts on neurogenesis in the human brain?

Many serious paralysis are due to damages to the spinal chord or the brain, which is classified as part of the CNS. The low regenerative capabilities of the CNS also explains why it is so hard to recover from paralysis.

So where does neurogenesis occur exactly? Only in the Dentate Gyrus and hippocampus?

Any chemicals out there that can help with neuro regenerative processes?
New episode of OUTSIDERS: http://www.debate.org...
Episode 4 - They walk among us
Adam_Godzilla
Posts: 2,487
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5/27/2015 7:08:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/27/2015 8:47:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/27/2015 12:19:21 AM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 10:48:44 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:41:31 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:27:07 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 9:22:49 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:47:05 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 5/26/2015 6:14:25 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
At 5/26/2015 7:41:15 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:

What I'm saying is that you shouldn't confuse neurogenesis with neural regeneration. They are not the same thing. Generation is not regeneration.

The hippocampus is the only place adult neurogenesis is confirmed in humans, and its function is to support memory encoding, not to repair injury.

"Also, I think what you're saying is that, in your definition, neurogenesis helps better encode memories. But I believe that's due in fact to neural regeneration itself."

I don't know what you mean by that last sentence. Syntactically it says that neurogenesis helps better encode memories due to neural regeneration, but I don't think that's what you meant.

So what you're saying is that neural regeneration and neurogenesis are two different processes? I looked it up and it seems neural regenration is more to neural connection repairs while neurogenesis is individual neuron cell reproduction. Is this what you mean?

Yes, they are different. Neural regeneration is the pair of neural connections and also the replacement of lost neurons, whereas neurogenesis is the birth of new neurons. So there is overlap in the concepts, hypothetically, but for adults, there probably isn't neurogenesis in neural regeneration.

I hope that makes it more clear.

It does, thank you.

As what might be a fitting conclusion to this thread, I am interested to know what your views are on the topic now.

I'm convinced it occurs now. However, from Suzanna Becker's article, she says; "that a continual turnover of neurons in the DG could contribute to the development of event-unique memory traces that act to reduce interference between highly similar inputs". - http://www.researchgate.net...

So I'm confused as to why you say that no neural reproduction occurs in the adult brain when her article states so. She says, "results support the hypothesis that adult-born neurons in the DG contribute to the orthogonalization of incoming information."

Did you get a chance to read from some of the scientists I mentioned?
Only abstracts at the moment.

Ah, because reproduction implies that they are replacing or restoring functionality of previous neurons, but that isn't the case with neurogenesis. Just a technicality in terms really. While neurons are dying off in the dentate gyrus, the new neurons aren't there to replace the functions of the old neurons, but to encode for new memories which are more relevant (by making them more separable from highly similar memories).

I see. Where do these new neurons come from? Wouldn't they come from old neuron cells?
That was a pretty good paper that came out of that lab. Nick has another paper coming out soon, and Suzanna is writing up a book chapter on hippocampal neurogenesis that should be coming out soon (I'll ask about the title of the book), so you may want to take a look at those when they're available, if you're still interested in the topic.

Sure, I'll look into it.

From HG Kuhn, H Dickinson-Aonson, & FH Gage. Neurogenesis in the Dentate Gyrus of the Adult Rat: Age-Related Decrease of Neuronal Progenitor Proliferation. The Journal of Neuroscience, 16(6):2027-2022. 1996.

The process of neural genesis in the adult dentate gyrus can be
divided into three distinct phases. First, neural precursor cells that
reside at the border between the hilus and the granule cell layer
(GCL) undergo cell division. Early markers of this proliferation
are incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) or [3H]thymidine
into the DNA of dividing precursor cells and increased
immunoreactivity to the ccl1 cycle regulatory protein RB (the
retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product) and to the ccl1 cycledependent
kinase cdc2 (Okano et al., 1993). Second, newborn
cells begin to migrate into the GCL and extend neuronal processes.
This step is accompanied by expression of polysialylatedNCAM
(PSA-NCAM), the embryonic form of neural cell adhesion
molecule (Seki and Arai, 1993). The presence of PSANCAM
in the embryonic and adult brain is highly correlated with
neuronal precursor migration and differentiation (Chuong and
Edelman, 1984; Bonfanti et al., 1992; Ono et al., 1994; Rousselot
et al., 1994). In the adult hippocampus, PSA-NCAM is present in
cells that reside at the border between hilus and GCL, including
newborn granule cells (Seki and Arai, 1993). Third, the cells
integrate into the GCL and begin to express the neuronal marker
neuron-specific enolase (Cameron et al., 1993).


I hope that's a good start. Are you able to access this paper? http://www.jneurosci.org...

Thank you! I'll be enjoying this.
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debate_power
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5/29/2015 4:02:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

Do you mean naturally-occurring neurogenesis? Also, I thought that humans generated brain cells up to a certain age.
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Adam_Godzilla
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5/31/2015 10:13:47 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/29/2015 4:02:12 PM, debate_power wrote:
At 5/25/2015 7:21:34 PM, Adam_Godzilla wrote:
Brain tissue repair in humans has not been confirmed, neurogenesis has only been found in animals like white mice.

I know that obviously means humans should have neurogenesis capabilities but... I'm still skeptical.

Do you mean naturally-occurring neurogenesis? Also, I thought that humans generated brain cells up to a certain age.

Yes. And also yes (I think). The question has been resolved for me. I'm convinced it's real.
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