Total Posts:63|Showing Posts:1-30|Last Page
Jump to topic:

Ask a Submariner!

Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/15/2015 4:45:05 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Hey all....

I am a former US Navy Submariner. I was in for eight years (six active) and served on both a fast-attack sub and a missile boat. I just returned from a statewide former Submariners' Convention so I have been thinking about my days underwater lately. LOL

Many people I have learned over the years are interested in Subs. And their history.

I would be more than happy to answer any questions on the topic.

(I was not sure if I should post this on the "science" or the "history" thread. but I chose here since very few things in this world are more technologically awesome as nuclear submarines.)

Thanks for your sincere interest. And your time.

Drew.
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 1:28:43 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/15/2015 4:52:05 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
How well does your desalination pig run?

Very well, thank you.

The desalinization "scrubbers" are just one of the many techno marvels on a modern nuclear submarine. As they converted seawater to fresh water for us. But still, potable water was a commodity, the de-sal scrubbers could do about 100 gallons a day, if memory serves. So we were always advised to conserve. For example, no "hollywood showers" which lasted more than five minutes or so.

"Pig boats" were indeed a nickname for subs in the WWII era!

thanks.
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 1:45:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/15/2015 9:57:26 PM, RuvDraba wrote:
That sounds like an interesting topic, SoM. What are some little-known facts about modern submarines that you think might surprise?

Hmmm..

Didja know...the nuclear reactor on a sub can last for about 25 years before its fuel rods are spent? So..if not for the fact that subs have human crews who need food--which a sub can only store enough for 6-months max--it could conceivably stay underwater and cruise for a couple of decades. Indeed, this is probably the future of subs--drones.

Didja know that on a boomer, an SSBN like I was on in the USS Florida, we had 28 Trident ICBM's. Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. And each of them had 7 MIRVS's. (multiple independent re-entry vehicles.) bomblets.

Each one of the MIRVs could break free from the ICBM and seek it's own target. A city.
Each nuke on each MIRV 10 times the power of Fat Man.

So...28 times 7 is how many cities one single boomer can take out. As long as they are within 2500 miles or so.

More firepower on one boomer than has been unleashed in ALL of the wars in the history of mankind.

The air scrubbers on subs are so efficient and devoid of smells that when we would return home after deployment it was like olfactory overload. I could smell everything for a few days: grass; blacktops in the sun; dried paint; food cooking from a mile away; car exhaust when I was outside was so stifling it was like you were in a small garage with five cars running. LOL

The crew wear little badges on their poopy suits that look like laminated ID badges. They are really "dosimieters" which measure our radiation exposure to the Nuclear reactor. They are checked weekly by the corpsman (me!).

We used to have fun playing cat and mouse games with Russian Akulas. Pinging each other, that sort of thing.

Submariners east the best food in the military. Ice cream machines; steak; lobster; snacks anytime you want. (Till the end of the cruise when the good stuff has run out.) You would think we would learn to pace it out but we never did.)

To be eligible for sub service you have to score in the top 10% of ALL personnel in the Navy when you take your ASVAB test.
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,848
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 1:49:59 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/15/2015 4:45:05 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
Hey all....

I am a former US Navy Submariner. I was in for eight years (six active) and served on both a fast-attack sub and a missile boat. I just returned from a statewide former Submariners' Convention so I have been thinking about my days underwater lately. LOL

Many people I have learned over the years are interested in Subs. And their history.

I would be more than happy to answer any questions on the topic.

(I was not sure if I should post this on the "science" or the "history" thread. but I chose here since very few things in this world are more technologically awesome as nuclear submarines.)

Thanks for your sincere interest. And your time.

Drew.

What's it like to be seamen?
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 2:06:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 1:49:59 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 6/15/2015 4:45:05 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
Hey all....

I am a former US Navy Submariner. I was in for eight years (six active) and served on both a fast-attack sub and a missile boat. I just returned from a statewide former Submariners' Convention so I have been thinking about my days underwater lately. LOL

Many people I have learned over the years are interested in Subs. And their history.

I would be more than happy to answer any questions on the topic.

(I was not sure if I should post this on the "science" or the "history" thread. but I chose here since very few things in this world are more technologically awesome as nuclear submarines.)

Thanks for your sincere interest. And your time.

Drew.

What's it like to be seamen?

What's it like to have seamen in your mouth and on your face?

You look to be the type that would be way into that.

Or maybe not?
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,848
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 2:08:07 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 2:06:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/16/2015 1:49:59 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 6/15/2015 4:45:05 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
Hey all....

I am a former US Navy Submariner. I was in for eight years (six active) and served on both a fast-attack sub and a missile boat. I just returned from a statewide former Submariners' Convention so I have been thinking about my days underwater lately. LOL

Many people I have learned over the years are interested in Subs. And their history.

I would be more than happy to answer any questions on the topic.

(I was not sure if I should post this on the "science" or the "history" thread. but I chose here since very few things in this world are more technologically awesome as nuclear submarines.)

Thanks for your sincere interest. And your time.

Drew.

What's it like to be seamen?

What's it like to have seamen in your mouth and on your face?

You look to be the type that would be way into that.

Or maybe not?

You just took a joke way too far.
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,306
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 3:05:50 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 1:28:43 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/15/2015 4:52:05 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
How well does your desalination pig run?

Very well, thank you.

The desalinization "scrubbers" are just one of the many techno marvels on a modern nuclear submarine. As they converted seawater to fresh water for us. But still, potable water was a commodity, the de-sal scrubbers could do about 100 gallons a day, if memory serves. So we were always advised to conserve. For example, no "hollywood showers" which lasted more than five minutes or so.

"Pig boats" were indeed a nickname for subs in the WWII era!

thanks.

I only got to train in a mockup of a submarine in Windsor (went to surface nuclear ships after)
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,306
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 3:08:11 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 1:45:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/15/2015 9:57:26 PM, RuvDraba wrote:
That sounds like an interesting topic, SoM. What are some little-known facts about modern submarines that you think might surprise?

Hmmm..

Didja know...the nuclear reactor on a sub can last for about 25 years before its fuel rods are spent? So..if not for the fact that subs have human crews who need food--which a sub can only store enough for 6-months max--it could conceivably stay underwater and cruise for a couple of decades. Indeed, this is probably the future of subs--drones.

I got to take part in a nuclear refuelling procedure in Norfolk, Took months, and every inch was pre planned with contingency scenarios.
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,306
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 3:17:39 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/15/2015 4:45:05 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
Hey all....

I am a former US Navy Submariner. I was in for eight years (six active) and served on both a fast-attack sub and a missile boat. I just returned from a statewide former Submariners' Convention so I have been thinking about my days underwater lately. LOL

Many people I have learned over the years are interested in Subs. And their history.

I would be more than happy to answer any questions on the topic.

(I was not sure if I should post this on the "science" or the "history" thread. but I chose here since very few things in this world are more technologically awesome as nuclear submarines.)

Thanks for your sincere interest. And your time.

Drew.

I'll ask a real question lol.
Have you ever or heard from someone who had a near bubble collapse in the pressurizer?
RuvDraba
Posts: 6,033
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 4:00:40 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 1:45:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/15/2015 9:57:26 PM, RuvDraba wrote:
That sounds like an interesting topic, SoM. What are some little-known facts about modern submarines that you think might surprise?

So...28 times 7 is how many cities one single boomer can take out. As long as they are within 2500 miles or so.
That's more genocide than war, surely. A terrifying prospect, SoM.

The air scrubbers on subs are so efficient and devoid of smells that when we would return home after deployment it was like olfactory overload. I could smell everything for a few days: grass; blacktops in the sun; dried paint; food cooking from a mile away; car exhaust when I was outside was so stifling it was like you were in a small garage with five cars running. LOL
That would be wonderful research for some submariner fiction!

The crew wear little badges on their poopy suits that look like laminated ID badges. They are really "dosimieters" which measure our radiation exposure to the Nuclear reactor. They are checked weekly by the corpsman (me!).
What are the most common injuries and ailments on a sub?

Submariners east the best food in the military. Ice cream machines; steak; lobster; snacks anytime you want. (Till the end of the cruise when the good stuff has run out.) You would think we would learn to pace it out but we never did.)
How do personnel exercise? How much exercise do they get? Do they finish a tour fatter or skinnier than when they started?

To be eligible for sub service you have to score in the top 10% of ALL personnel in the Navy when you take your ASVAB test.
Mrs Draba has done some consultancy to the Australian navy. Due to prolonged isolation, Australian naval personnel are renowned for getting a bit crazy on long deployments. How crazy do submariners get?
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,306
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 4:12:37 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 1:45:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:

The crew wear little badges on their poopy suits that look like laminated ID badges. They are really "dosimieters" which measure our radiation exposure to the Nuclear reactor. They are checked weekly by the corpsman (me!).

What did your TL Dosimeter reader oven look like?
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 4:52:07 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 4:00:40 PM, RuvDraba wrote:
At 6/16/2015 1:45:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/15/2015 9:57:26 PM, RuvDraba wrote:
That sounds like an interesting topic, SoM. What are some little-known facts about modern submarines that you think might surprise?

So...28 times 7 is how many cities one single boomer can take out. As long as they are within 2500 miles or so.
That's more genocide than war, surely. A terrifying prospect, SoM.

The air scrubbers on subs are so efficient and devoid of smells that when we would return home after deployment it was like olfactory overload. I could smell everything for a few days: grass; blacktops in the sun; dried paint; food cooking from a mile away; car exhaust when I was outside was so stifling it was like you were in a small garage with five cars running. LOL
That would be wonderful research for some submariner fiction!

The crew wear little badges on their poopy suits that look like laminated ID badges. They are really "dosimieters" which measure our radiation exposure to the Nuclear reactor. They are checked weekly by the corpsman (me!).
What are the most common injuries and ailments on a sub?

Submariners east the best food in the military. Ice cream machines; steak; lobster; snacks anytime you want. (Till the end of the cruise when the good stuff has run out.) You would think we would learn to pace it out but we never did.)
How do personnel exercise? How much exercise do they get? Do they finish a tour fatter or skinnier than when they started?

To be eligible for sub service you have to score in the top 10% of ALL personnel in the Navy when you take your ASVAB test.
Mrs Draba has done some consultancy to the Australian navy. Due to prolonged isolation, Australian naval personnel are renowned for getting a bit crazy on long deployments. How crazy do submariners get?

thanks for your interest, Ruv..

1--Re TN warfare. Yes..there would be no winners in that war. I am glad we never came close to having to "loose our birds." At least as far as I know.

A fast attack sub and a boomer have very different tasks when on deployments. People always ask me which I liked better, and I usually reply that it is pretty much a trade-off.

On a LA Class SSN, you actually get to make ports-of-call. Your patrols are shorter, and you don not stay submerged nearly as long. You do not generally go as deep--operating depth usually around 300 ft. You get a break now and again and get to visit "the steel beach" topside for some fresh air. You also spend more time in littoral waters, closer to the shore. You do recon; play games; do escorts for skimmers, etc.

But they are smaller than boomers. A fast attack boat--when I was in, was around 360 ft long and had a 32 ft. beam. Crew of about 110-115.

Boomers? Much bigger. More room. No hotracking. Almost 600 ft. long and almost 50 ft. wide. Crew only about 10% larger.

BUT: far longer patrols. Weeks underwater. No parts of call. You basically go out and hide. Plottin' holes! It's all about stealth. LOTS and LOTS of drills.

2--In all my deployments on both boats we never had a guy "lose it." No psych breakdowns. If you have a problem with confined spaces then you ain't gonna be on that sub in the first place. You wouldn't make it out of BESS. The Wet Trainer would get you. LOL The Navy devoted a lot of research and money to making sure their bubble-heads are happy when underway. Hence the good food I mentioned.

Common ailments. Well, we had a couple of appendectomies. Flu bugs can be troublesome. Colds. For obvious reasons. Also, not too bog a surprise: bruises from banging heads on overheads and shins and knees on hatches and bulkheads. Especially during drills and battle stations. A few inner ear maladies.

3--About the craziness. We tend to "let off the steam while on liberty. Lots of drinking and self-medication. Nothing too bad though. But, one of my regrets is that although I saw a lot of different countries on the Dallas, I did not take full advantage of seeing the sights, spending too much time in downtown bars. "In the gut" of said ports. LOL
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 4:54:09 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 4:12:37 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 1:45:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:

The crew wear little badges on their poopy suits that look like laminated ID badges. They are really "dosimieters" which measure our radiation exposure to the Nuclear reactor. They are checked weekly by the corpsman (me!).

What did your TL Dosimeter reader oven look like?

Ah..you obviously are familiar with thermo-luminescent dosis and the annealing oven? Were you a submariner too? Or maybe a contractor of a JAFO? We had lots of those guys with us from time to time. Hated it. More hotracking. LOL
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 4:58:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 3:08:11 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 1:45:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/15/2015 9:57:26 PM, RuvDraba wrote:
That sounds like an interesting topic, SoM. What are some little-known facts about modern submarines that you think might surprise?

Hmmm..

Didja know...the nuclear reactor on a sub can last for about 25 years before its fuel rods are spent? So..if not for the fact that subs have human crews who need food--which a sub can only store enough for 6-months max--it could conceivably stay underwater and cruise for a couple of decades. Indeed, this is probably the future of subs--drones.

I got to take part in a nuclear refuelling procedure in Norfolk, Took months, and every inch was pre planned with contingency scenarios.

Yeah, I know.

In fact that is why I transferred from the Dallas in Groton, CN down to Kings Bay, Georgia and the boomer the USS Florida. Work being done on our S6G Reactor. It was going to be 3 mos before our next deployment. Plus I got a promotion to E-5 as they needed a new HM2.

Were you with General Dynamics per chance? Electric Boat Division?
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:12:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 4:12:37 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 1:45:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:

The crew wear little badges on their poopy suits that look like laminated ID badges. They are really "dosimieters" which measure our radiation exposure to the Nuclear reactor. They are checked weekly by the corpsman (me!).

What did your TL Dosimeter reader oven look like?

Here is a pic of the closest I remember..

https://www.google.com...
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:18:39 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 3:17:39 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/15/2015 4:45:05 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
Hey all....

I am a former US Navy Submariner. I was in for eight years (six active) and served on both a fast-attack sub and a missile boat. I just returned from a statewide former Submariners' Convention so I have been thinking about my days underwater lately. LOL

Many people I have learned over the years are interested in Subs. And their history.

I would be more than happy to answer any questions on the topic.

(I was not sure if I should post this on the "science" or the "history" thread. but I chose here since very few things in this world are more technologically awesome as nuclear submarines.)

Thanks for your sincere interest. And your time.

Drew.

I'll ask a real question lol.
Have you ever or heard from someone who had a near bubble collapse in the pressurizer?

Are you yankin' my chain, amigo? LOL

Cuz...I think yo are mixing terminology.

I was not a nuke tech, but if I recall the pressurizer was a part of the SG6 that kept water from boiling too soon by pressurizing it.

And, last I heard, a bubble collapse is a term having to do with warfare; specifically when a pressure bubble--say, from a depth charge or other type of ASW weapon--collapses on or around the target ship's (or sub's) exterior hull.

So my answer to your semi-serious question is "no."
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:21:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 2:08:07 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 6/16/2015 2:06:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/16/2015 1:49:59 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 6/15/2015 4:45:05 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
Hey all....

I am a former US Navy Submariner. I was in for eight years (six active) and served on both a fast-attack sub and a missile boat. I just returned from a statewide former Submariners' Convention so I have been thinking about my days underwater lately. LOL

Many people I have learned over the years are interested in Subs. And their history.

I would be more than happy to answer any questions on the topic.

(I was not sure if I should post this on the "science" or the "history" thread. but I chose here since very few things in this world are more technologically awesome as nuclear submarines.)

Thanks for your sincere interest. And your time.

Drew.

What's it like to be seamen?

What's it like to have seamen in your mouth and on your face?

You look to be the type that would be way into that.

Or maybe not?

You just took a joke way too far.

Get over it.

And, yeah, judging by your rather juvenile OP to me. I have no trouble believing your 76 IQ.

Funny, I have often joked about somebody dumb having a "room temperature IQ" but you really do! LOL
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:28:25 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 2:08:07 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 6/16/2015 2:06:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/16/2015 1:49:59 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 6/15/2015 4:45:05 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
Hey all....

I am a former US Navy Submariner. I was in for eight years (six active) and served on both a fast-attack sub and a missile boat. I just returned from a statewide former Submariners' Convention so I have been thinking about my days underwater lately. LOL

Many people I have learned over the years are interested in Subs. And their history.

I would be more than happy to answer any questions on the topic.

(I was not sure if I should post this on the "science" or the "history" thread. but I chose here since very few things in this world are more technologically awesome as nuclear submarines.)

Thanks for your sincere interest. And your time.

Drew.

What's it like to be seamen?

What's it like to have seamen in your mouth and on your face?

You look to be the type that would be way into that.

Or maybe not?

You just took a joke way too far.

https://www.google.com...
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:34:01 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/15/2015 4:52:05 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
How well does your desalination pig run?

Intake pig? In the desal system?

I guess it ran OK..water always tasted fine to me. But sometimes a little oily. Especially in port.

The BT's would know about it than me.

Interesting trivia on origin of old term "pig boat" which I thought yo were talking about at first.

Back in pre- WWII the subs were tiny and also, they had no periscopes. So they had to constantly surface; open a hatch in the access sail; take a quick look; and then quickly submerge. Some observers thought the constant up and down actions reminded them of porpoises.

Old salts used to call porpoises "sea pigs."

Hence: Pig Boat.

Not used anymore, BTW. Nor for 40 years or so.

And why are subs called "boats" and not ships like all the other skimmers?

Back in the day, again when subs were tiny, they would be piggy-backed on larger ships. Or towed. Any vessel that small that can be carried like that was deemed a boat and not a ship by the Navy.
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,306
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:43:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 5:12:12 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/16/2015 4:12:37 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 1:45:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:

The crew wear little badges on their poopy suits that look like laminated ID badges. They are really "dosimieters" which measure our radiation exposure to the Nuclear reactor. They are checked weekly by the corpsman (me!).

What did your TL Dosimeter reader oven look like?

Here is a pic of the closest I remember..

https://www.google.com...

Yah! brings back old old memories!
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,306
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:45:58 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 5:18:39 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/16/2015 3:17:39 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/15/2015 4:45:05 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
Hey all....

I am a former US Navy Submariner. I was in for eight years (six active) and served on both a fast-attack sub and a missile boat. I just returned from a statewide former Submariners' Convention so I have been thinking about my days underwater lately. LOL

Many people I have learned over the years are interested in Subs. And their history.

I would be more than happy to answer any questions on the topic.

(I was not sure if I should post this on the "science" or the "history" thread. but I chose here since very few things in this world are more technologically awesome as nuclear submarines.)

Thanks for your sincere interest. And your time.

Drew.

I'll ask a real question lol.
Have you ever or heard from someone who had a near bubble collapse in the pressurizer?

Are you yankin' my chain, amigo? LOL

Cuz...I think yo are mixing terminology.

I was not a nuke tech, but if I recall the pressurizer was a part of the SG6 that kept water from boiling too soon by pressurizing it.

And, last I heard, a bubble collapse is a term having to do with warfare; specifically when a pressure bubble--say, from a depth charge or other type of ASW weapon--collapses on or around the target ship's (or sub's) exterior hull.

So my answer to your semi-serious question is "no."

Oh no lol. I meant the reactor pressurizer bubble, you know, the thing that keeps the coolant from flashing on the fuel plates and melting the fuel into the coolant? :D
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,306
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:47:47 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 5:18:39 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:

I was not a nuke tech, but if I recall the pressurizer was a part of the SG6 that kept water from boiling too soon by pressurizing it.

Oh whoops! I thought you were a fellow nuke :o

So much for sharing glow-worm stories!
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:51:53 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 5:43:44 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:12:12 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/16/2015 4:12:37 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 1:45:30 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:

The crew wear little badges on their poopy suits that look like laminated ID badges. They are really "dosimieters" which measure our radiation exposure to the Nuclear reactor. They are checked weekly by the corpsman (me!).

What did your TL Dosimeter reader oven look like?

Here is a pic of the closest I remember..

https://www.google.com...

Yah! brings back old old memories!

Tell me about it.

But even though we had a Torrek..that one looks a bit older, like maybe from the early 80s or late 70s. I am guessing we had the next model. I spent a lot of time on that damn thing..my Medical Officer always made me check the TLDs. He hated it. When I was on my 2nd deployment on the Dallas ours broke down and we had to "put in" to Toulon France to get a new one. Which was sweet because that was one of my favorite poc's.

Those hot little french girls loved submariners! LOL

But, yeah..we had to cut short our Med patrol. Precautionary measure, that. Even though we were having no problems with the SG6--or ever had--Navy regulations demand the TLD's be checked twice a week, so....
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:52:53 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 5:47:47 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:18:39 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:

I was not a nuke tech, but if I recall the pressurizer was a part of the SG6 that kept water from boiling too soon by pressurizing it.

Oh whoops! I thought you were a fellow nuke :o

So much for sharing glow-worm stories!

No! I wasn't smart enough for that, bro. I was a Hospital Corpsman.

(LOL--I was wondering why you kept asking me techno nuke questions!)
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,306
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:54:15 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 5:52:53 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:47:47 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:18:39 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:

I was not a nuke tech, but if I recall the pressurizer was a part of the SG6 that kept water from boiling too soon by pressurizing it.

Oh whoops! I thought you were a fellow nuke :o

So much for sharing glow-worm stories!

No! I wasn't smart enough for that, bro. I was a Hospital Corpsman.

(LOL--I was wondering why you kept asking me techno nuke questions!)

It's fine, I still like your renditions of the techno-Navy life, good times!
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 5:59:56 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 5:54:15 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:52:53 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:47:47 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:18:39 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:

I was not a nuke tech, but if I recall the pressurizer was a part of the SG6 that kept water from boiling too soon by pressurizing it.

Oh whoops! I thought you were a fellow nuke :o

So much for sharing glow-worm stories!

No! I wasn't smart enough for that, bro. I was a Hospital Corpsman.

(LOL--I was wondering why you kept asking me techno nuke questions!)

It's fine, I still like your renditions of the techno-Navy life, good times!

Thanks.

Yes..I enjoyed them. For the most part. Sometimes I think I should have stayed in and done my 20. I would only have four years left? LOL. And then get than nice pension check every month for the rest of my life.

But you know how it is: after six years and at age 28 I was ready to cut loose. Had enough of the Navy and the regimentation. And there is a good amount of stress when you are underwater for weeks at a time with 100 other dudes.

But you "FN's". Ya know--I did very well on my ASVAB but my recruiters said I scored high enough to do whatever NEC I wanted. Except for a Nuke. Guess my math score wasn't high enough. LOL
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,306
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/16/2015 9:58:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/16/2015 5:59:56 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:54:15 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:52:53 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:47:47 PM, Greyparrot wrote:
At 6/16/2015 5:18:39 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:

I was not a nuke tech, but if I recall the pressurizer was a part of the SG6 that kept water from boiling too soon by pressurizing it.

Oh whoops! I thought you were a fellow nuke :o

So much for sharing glow-worm stories!

No! I wasn't smart enough for that, bro. I was a Hospital Corpsman.

(LOL--I was wondering why you kept asking me techno nuke questions!)

It's fine, I still like your renditions of the techno-Navy life, good times!

Thanks.

Yes..I enjoyed them. For the most part. Sometimes I think I should have stayed in and done my 20. I would only have four years left? LOL. And then get than nice pension check every month for the rest of my life.

But you know how it is: after six years and at age 28 I was ready to cut loose. Had enough of the Navy and the regimentation. And there is a good amount of stress when you are underwater for weeks at a time with 100 other dudes.

But you "FN's". Ya know--I did very well on my ASVAB but my recruiters said I scored high enough to do whatever NEC I wanted. Except for a Nuke. Guess my math score wasn't high enough. LOL

You have to take a separate "nuke" test right after the ASVAB also. I think I got a 72/80. Memory might be fuzzy.