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America's Newest and Most Awesome Spy Plane!

Saint_of_Me
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6/17/2015 3:05:36 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Just got the new Popular Science in the mail last week and they had this Bad Boy on the cover. Goodbye Blackbird--hello SR-72.

This baby will shred the upper atmosphere at a hair-on-fire Mach 6. That's over 3000 mph. Check it out.

I love aviation; All things jets and planes..my favorite era being the WWII warbirds.

Any other aviation buffs out there? Pilots? What do you think of this new bird?

http://www.popsci.com...
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Fly
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6/17/2015 4:27:38 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Cool. We need a craft for recon that can be tasked more easily than a satellite. The Blackbird did a great job but was simply too expensive to operate. Having a drone do it is much more realistic and cheaper-- it takes a lot to sustain a person in that environment.

As a pilot, I'm not all that fascinated by drones, though. But the SR-71 is easily the most fascinating aircraft ever made. I was able to watch one take off from Beale AFB as a young CAP cadet. I have written numerous school papers on the plane and got A's on all of them (being passionate about the subject is key for me). It is one aircraft that captures the imagination of people who otherwise have little interest in planes.

One of my prized possessions is my autographed copy of the book "Sled Driver," written by a retired Blackbird pilot.

But I'm with you regarding WWII being my personal favorite era for aircraft.
"You don't have a right to be a jerk."
--Religion Forum's hypocrite extraordinaire serving up lulz
Saint_of_Me
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6/17/2015 4:45:49 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/17/2015 4:27:38 PM, Fly wrote:
Cool. We need a craft for recon that can be tasked more easily than a satellite. The Blackbird did a great job but was simply too expensive to operate. Having a drone do it is much more realistic and cheaper-- it takes a lot to sustain a person in that environment.

As a pilot, I'm not all that fascinated by drones, though. But the SR-71 is easily the most fascinating aircraft ever made. I was able to watch one take off from Beale AFB as a young CAP cadet. I have written numerous school papers on the plane and got A's on all of them (being passionate about the subject is key for me). It is one aircraft that captures the imagination of people who otherwise have little interest in planes.

One of my prized possessions is my autographed copy of the book "Sled Driver," written by a retired Blackbird pilot.

But I'm with you regarding WWII being my personal favorite era for aircraft.

"Sled Drive" sound interesting. I am going to see if I can get it at my local public or University library.

You would be interested to know that where I live, Prescott, AZ, is home to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Institute. I understand it is a very well-respected school in the country for that field?

I got to see an SR-71 in the ground in San Antonio. Awesome piece of technology, that.

Relating to: one of our shrinks here used to be an Air Force Psychiatrist and his specialty was doing therapy with SR-71 pilots. This was actually most of his job! I didn't know it but upon thinking about it, it makes sense that that would be pretty stressful. I understand that most of our astronauts have endured significant mental health issues as well.

My favorite warbirds are the Navy Corsair and the "cadillac of the airways: the P-51 Mustang."

Thanks!

Drew.

PS........what kind of birds did you fly?
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Saint_of_Me
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6/17/2015 6:32:36 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Yep--As i suspected, "Sled Driver" by Brian Shul is in circulation at Embry-Riddle library. It is currently checked-out but I put it on hold and should have it within a couple weeks.

Thanks for the heads-up, amigo.

Drew.
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Fly
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6/17/2015 6:39:14 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/17/2015 4:45:49 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/17/2015 4:27:38 PM, Fly wrote:
Cool. We need a craft for recon that can be tasked more easily than a satellite. The Blackbird did a great job but was simply too expensive to operate. Having a drone do it is much more realistic and cheaper-- it takes a lot to sustain a person in that environment.

As a pilot, I'm not all that fascinated by drones, though. But the SR-71 is easily the most fascinating aircraft ever made. I was able to watch one take off from Beale AFB as a young CAP cadet. I have written numerous school papers on the plane and got A's on all of them (being passionate about the subject is key for me). It is one aircraft that captures the imagination of people who otherwise have little interest in planes.

One of my prized possessions is my autographed copy of the book "Sled Driver," written by a retired Blackbird pilot.

But I'm with you regarding WWII being my personal favorite era for aircraft.

"Sled Drive" sound interesting. I am going to see if I can get it at my local public or University library.

You would be interested to know that where I live, Prescott, AZ, is home to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Institute. I understand it is a very well-respected school in the country for that field?

I got to see an SR-71 in the ground in San Antonio. Awesome piece of technology, that.

Relating to: one of our shrinks here used to be an Air Force Psychiatrist and his specialty was doing therapy with SR-71 pilots. This was actually most of his job! I didn't know it but upon thinking about it, it makes sense that that would be pretty stressful. I understand that most of our astronauts have endured significant mental health issues as well.

My favorite warbirds are the Navy Corsair and the "cadillac of the airways: the P-51 Mustang."

Thanks!

Drew.

PS........what kind of birds did you fly?

Yeah, a lot of my coworkers come from Embry Riddle. I currently fly the CRJ 200/700/900 series of aircraft. The 700 is my avatar, btw. I have flown quite a few general aviation and some ex military aircraft. The most notable:

Piper J-3 Cub
Cessna 140
Cessna 210
Decathlon
Beech Bonanza
Mooney
Challenger ultralight
T-34 Mentor
T-6 Texan (I wouldn't trust myself to fly this one solo just yet)
Pitts S-2C
Extra 300L
Lancair Columbia
Cirrus
Piper Navajo/Chieftain
Stearman biplane

As for WWII warbirds, the Corsair and Mustang are usually at the top of most lists. I would add in the Bearcat, Sea Fury, and Tigercat, although those are more accurately postwar/Korean era piston jobs...
"You don't have a right to be a jerk."
--Religion Forum's hypocrite extraordinaire serving up lulz
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
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6/17/2015 6:47:11 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/17/2015 6:39:14 PM, Fly wrote:
At 6/17/2015 4:45:49 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/17/2015 4:27:38 PM, Fly wrote:
Cool. We need a craft for recon that can be tasked more easily than a satellite. The Blackbird did a great job but was simply too expensive to operate. Having a drone do it is much more realistic and cheaper-- it takes a lot to sustain a person in that environment.

As a pilot, I'm not all that fascinated by drones, though. But the SR-71 is easily the most fascinating aircraft ever made. I was able to watch one take off from Beale AFB as a young CAP cadet. I have written numerous school papers on the plane and got A's on all of them (being passionate about the subject is key for me). It is one aircraft that captures the imagination of people who otherwise have little interest in planes.

One of my prized possessions is my autographed copy of the book "Sled Driver," written by a retired Blackbird pilot.

But I'm with you regarding WWII being my personal favorite era for aircraft.

"Sled Drive" sound interesting. I am going to see if I can get it at my local public or University library.

You would be interested to know that where I live, Prescott, AZ, is home to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Institute. I understand it is a very well-respected school in the country for that field?

I got to see an SR-71 in the ground in San Antonio. Awesome piece of technology, that.

Relating to: one of our shrinks here used to be an Air Force Psychiatrist and his specialty was doing therapy with SR-71 pilots. This was actually most of his job! I didn't know it but upon thinking about it, it makes sense that that would be pretty stressful. I understand that most of our astronauts have endured significant mental health issues as well.

My favorite warbirds are the Navy Corsair and the "cadillac of the airways: the P-51 Mustang."

Thanks!

Drew.

PS........what kind of birds did you fly?

Yeah, a lot of my coworkers come from Embry Riddle. I currently fly the CRJ 200/700/900 series of aircraft. The 700 is my avatar, btw. I have flown quite a few general aviation and some ex military aircraft. The most notable:

Piper J-3 Cub
Cessna 140
Cessna 210
Decathlon
Beech Bonanza
Mooney
Challenger ultralight
T-34 Mentor
T-6 Texan (I wouldn't trust myself to fly this one solo just yet)
Pitts S-2C
Extra 300L
Lancair Columbia
Cirrus
Piper Navajo/Chieftain
Stearman biplane

As for WWII warbirds, the Corsair and Mustang are usually at the top of most lists. I would add in the Bearcat, Sea Fury, and Tigercat, although those are more accurately postwar/Korean era piston jobs...

I would love to get your take on "the doctor killer." The Bonanza.

Also..I am envious. Going up in a biplane is high on my bucket list! True open cockpit flying. Did you enjoy it? Would you own one rather than a regular private craft?

Thanks!
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Fly
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6/17/2015 7:03:55 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/17/2015 6:47:11 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/17/2015 6:39:14 PM, Fly wrote:
At 6/17/2015 4:45:49 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/17/2015 4:27:38 PM, Fly wrote:
Cool. We need a craft for recon that can be tasked more easily than a satellite. The Blackbird did a great job but was simply too expensive to operate. Having a drone do it is much more realistic and cheaper-- it takes a lot to sustain a person in that environment.

As a pilot, I'm not all that fascinated by drones, though. But the SR-71 is easily the most fascinating aircraft ever made. I was able to watch one take off from Beale AFB as a young CAP cadet. I have written numerous school papers on the plane and got A's on all of them (being passionate about the subject is key for me). It is one aircraft that captures the imagination of people who otherwise have little interest in planes.

One of my prized possessions is my autographed copy of the book "Sled Driver," written by a retired Blackbird pilot.

But I'm with you regarding WWII being my personal favorite era for aircraft.

"Sled Drive" sound interesting. I am going to see if I can get it at my local public or University library.

You would be interested to know that where I live, Prescott, AZ, is home to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Institute. I understand it is a very well-respected school in the country for that field?

I got to see an SR-71 in the ground in San Antonio. Awesome piece of technology, that.

Relating to: one of our shrinks here used to be an Air Force Psychiatrist and his specialty was doing therapy with SR-71 pilots. This was actually most of his job! I didn't know it but upon thinking about it, it makes sense that that would be pretty stressful. I understand that most of our astronauts have endured significant mental health issues as well.

My favorite warbirds are the Navy Corsair and the "cadillac of the airways: the P-51 Mustang."

Thanks!

Drew.

PS........what kind of birds did you fly?

Yeah, a lot of my coworkers come from Embry Riddle. I currently fly the CRJ 200/700/900 series of aircraft. The 700 is my avatar, btw. I have flown quite a few general aviation and some ex military aircraft. The most notable:

Piper J-3 Cub
Cessna 140
Cessna 210
Decathlon
Beech Bonanza
Mooney
Challenger ultralight
T-34 Mentor
T-6 Texan (I wouldn't trust myself to fly this one solo just yet)
Pitts S-2C
Extra 300L
Lancair Columbia
Cirrus
Piper Navajo/Chieftain
Stearman biplane

As for WWII warbirds, the Corsair and Mustang are usually at the top of most lists. I would add in the Bearcat, Sea Fury, and Tigercat, although those are more accurately postwar/Korean era piston jobs...

I would love to get your take on "the doctor killer." The Bonanza.

Also..I am envious. Going up in a biplane is high on my bucket list! True open cockpit flying. Did you enjoy it? Would you own one rather than a regular private craft?

Thanks!

The Bonanza is one of the greatest airplanes ever designed. It was so good and so efficient, in fact, that it basically killed off two other classic, competing airplanes: the Cessna 195 and the Navion.

Doctors and attorneys really liked its looks, speed, and comfort. The problem is that many professionals are able to afford more plane than they can handle. A lot of these guys would take these planes into cloudy skies, get disoriented, the plane would quickly accelerate to redline, and they would over stress the V tail, it would break off, and that would be all she wrote...

The V tail looked really cool, but it was prone to breaking off if the pilot over stressed the plane. An Airworthiness Directive was made to beef up the tail structure after it got the rep of being a "doctor killer."

Nowadays, there is the Cirrus which has a built in parachute, and guys who lose control have saved their lives with it...

The Stearman is another classic plane. I saw it as a heavy, draggy Cub. I believe that those types of planes make much better aircraft handlers (pilots) than the planes today, but, ya know, insurance companies like planes that are virtually foolproof.

My personal choice for a plane to own would be the Pitts Special. Then, if my pocketbook were to expand generously, I would look into owning a T-6 Texan. For my retirement years, I like the Siai Marchetti or the T-34 Mentor.
"You don't have a right to be a jerk."
--Religion Forum's hypocrite extraordinaire serving up lulz
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
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6/17/2015 7:11:39 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/17/2015 7:03:55 PM, Fly wrote:
At 6/17/2015 6:47:11 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/17/2015 6:39:14 PM, Fly wrote:
At 6/17/2015 4:45:49 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/17/2015 4:27:38 PM, Fly wrote:
Cool. We need a craft for recon that can be tasked more easily than a satellite. The Blackbird did a great job but was simply too expensive to operate. Having a drone do it is much more realistic and cheaper-- it takes a lot to sustain a person in that environment.

As a pilot, I'm not all that fascinated by drones, though. But the SR-71 is easily the most fascinating aircraft ever made. I was able to watch one take off from Beale AFB as a young CAP cadet. I have written numerous school papers on the plane and got A's on all of them (being passionate about the subject is key for me). It is one aircraft that captures the imagination of people who otherwise have little interest in planes.

One of my prized possessions is my autographed copy of the book "Sled Driver," written by a retired Blackbird pilot.

But I'm with you regarding WWII being my personal favorite era for aircraft.

"Sled Drive" sound interesting. I am going to see if I can get it at my local public or University library.

You would be interested to know that where I live, Prescott, AZ, is home to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Institute. I understand it is a very well-respected school in the country for that field?

I got to see an SR-71 in the ground in San Antonio. Awesome piece of technology, that.

Relating to: one of our shrinks here used to be an Air Force Psychiatrist and his specialty was doing therapy with SR-71 pilots. This was actually most of his job! I didn't know it but upon thinking about it, it makes sense that that would be pretty stressful. I understand that most of our astronauts have endured significant mental health issues as well.

My favorite warbirds are the Navy Corsair and the "cadillac of the airways: the P-51 Mustang."

Thanks!

Drew.

PS........what kind of birds did you fly?

Yeah, a lot of my coworkers come from Embry Riddle. I currently fly the CRJ 200/700/900 series of aircraft. The 700 is my avatar, btw. I have flown quite a few general aviation and some ex military aircraft. The most notable:

Piper J-3 Cub
Cessna 140
Cessna 210
Decathlon
Beech Bonanza
Mooney
Challenger ultralight
T-34 Mentor
T-6 Texan (I wouldn't trust myself to fly this one solo just yet)
Pitts S-2C
Extra 300L
Lancair Columbia
Cirrus
Piper Navajo/Chieftain
Stearman biplane

As for WWII warbirds, the Corsair and Mustang are usually at the top of most lists. I would add in the Bearcat, Sea Fury, and Tigercat, although those are more accurately postwar/Korean era piston jobs...

I would love to get your take on "the doctor killer." The Bonanza.

Also..I am envious. Going up in a biplane is high on my bucket list! True open cockpit flying. Did you enjoy it? Would you own one rather than a regular private craft?

Thanks!

The Bonanza is one of the greatest airplanes ever designed. It was so good and so efficient, in fact, that it basically killed off two other classic, competing airplanes: the Cessna 195 and the Navion.

Doctors and attorneys really liked its looks, speed, and comfort. The problem is that many professionals are able to afford more plane than they can handle. A lot of these guys would take these planes into cloudy skies, get disoriented, the plane would quickly accelerate to redline, and they would over stress the V tail, it would break off, and that would be all she wrote...

The V tail looked really cool, but it was prone to breaking off if the pilot over stressed the plane. An Airworthiness Directive was made to beef up the tail structure after it got the rep of being a "doctor killer."

Nowadays, there is the Cirrus which has a built in parachute, and guys who lose control have saved their lives with it...

The Stearman is another classic plane. I saw it as a heavy, draggy Cub. I believe that those types of planes make much better aircraft handlers (pilots) than the planes today, but, ya know, insurance companies like planes that are virtually foolproof.

My personal choice for a plane to own would be the Pitts Special. Then, if my pocketbook were to expand generously, I would look into owning a T-6 Texan. For my retirement years, I like the Siai Marchetti or the T-34 Mentor.

Great insight, Fly. thanks.

But one line made me chuckle, although I guess it really isn't funny.

The way you said "the V-Tail was prone to breaking off..."

I dunno, it just hit me as funny. Like, not a good endorsement or something you would see in an ad for the plane. LOL.

I imagine one of those TV or radio commercials where, after the AD they have to do a disclaimer--usually speaking very rapidly--on side effects or hazards or terms and conditions or whatever.

"Warning: during over-stressed aerodynamic conditions the V-Tail may have a tendency to become dislodged from the aircraft."
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
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6/17/2015 7:14:42 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Man...even though she is old now, the specs on the Blackbird still can drop your jaw, eh?

http://www.wvi.com...
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Fly
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6/17/2015 7:16:22 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Oh, I see now that you wanted to know how I liked flying the Bonanza... well, Beechcraft was really good at making pilots' airplanes-- smooth, light controls, and very easy handling. The Bonanza has a lot of power and a slick airframe. It was the fastest plane I had flown up to that point. It is a comfortable and great looking airplane.

The drawback of having light controls, though, is that the plane wouldn't always stay where you put it. Some planes fly like they are on railroad tracks, but not the Bonanza, hence its "killer" reputation...
"You don't have a right to be a jerk."
--Religion Forum's hypocrite extraordinaire serving up lulz
Saint_of_Me
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7/5/2015 7:31:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/17/2015 7:16:22 PM, Fly wrote:
Oh, I see now that you wanted to know how I liked flying the Bonanza... well, Beechcraft was really good at making pilots' airplanes-- smooth, light controls, and very easy handling. The Bonanza has a lot of power and a slick airframe. It was the fastest plane I had flown up to that point. It is a comfortable and great looking airplane.

The drawback of having light controls, though, is that the plane wouldn't always stay where you put it. Some planes fly like they are on railroad tracks, but not the Bonanza, hence its "killer" reputation...

Hey, FLY!

Do you per chance have any time in choppers?

They have always been an obsession of mine. If I could own and fly any sort of aircraft it might be a chopper, along the lines of a Jet Ranger of something of that ilk.

My brother has a great job for an oil company based out of Houston. He just flies these rich oil guys around the country, on business trips and also visiting their various drilling sites. He flew Black Hawks in the Army for 8 years.

If you do, I have a couple questions. One on a video I will link.

Thanks!
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
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7/7/2015 3:42:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/17/2015 7:16:22 PM, Fly wrote:
Oh, I see now that you wanted to know how I liked flying the Bonanza... well, Beechcraft was really good at making pilots' airplanes-- smooth, light controls, and very easy handling. The Bonanza has a lot of power and a slick airframe. It was the fastest plane I had flown up to that point. It is a comfortable and great looking airplane.

The drawback of having light controls, though, is that the plane wouldn't always stay where you put it. Some planes fly like they are on railroad tracks, but not the Bonanza, hence its "killer" reputation...

Hey Fly!

My copy of "Sled Driver" just came in for me at my campus library. Nice! I did not know it would have so many graphics and pics. Like a coffee table book. I plan to begin reading it tonight.

Thanks again for the recommendation!
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.