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Should we study the Ocean more?

Saint_of_Me
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6/26/2015 4:09:42 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
One time when I was in the Navy and serving on the USS Dallas, we were just getting underway, leaving the beautiful port of Holy Loch, Scotland. (My favorite place of anywhere we ever made a port-of-call.

I was topside, taking a last look at the mainland and the North Atlantic at sunrise, before we submerged. (In subs it is common practice to occasionally allow the crew members to go "up topside" to get some fresh air and take in some sights so as to get a brief hiatus from the confines of a football-length steel tube that spends weeks sometimes underwater. LOL. We do this in shifts--usually according to "divisions." Maybe 6-8 guys at a time. (More on a boomer).

So I was the last guy up there. Taking my time. I was called down below and lingered a bit..and I saw one of the strangest sights I ever have in my life. (Indeed: THEE strangest ever while at sea.)

OK skeptics...here we go! LOL. A sea creature...I don't know what else to call it. Rears-up at about 320 degrees to our post side. Probably about, oh, 40 meters away.
It was sort of the shape of a very large porpoise. But more elongated--so much so to begin taking on "snake" dimensions--, and about six times the size of a porpoise. Well, more, actually, I reckoned it to be about 50' long. But perhaps bigger since the tail end of it remained submerged.

It also had huge pectoral fins--red/purple in color; so big as to resemble wings. It had these as well on the dorsal area. And another smaller set about two-thirds down its body toward its tail. The primary color of the body of the creature was blue-gray.

He also had catfish like "whiskers" surrounding his snout and lower mouth. Huge fuckkkers--probably 8" wide and two feet long. Probably 6-8 of them. Then he submerges. I would say the total time I saw him was about five seconds. But, man: the light was good, the sun was behind me, and when he submerged he was within 20 meters or so.

(I am pretty familiar with most known ocean creatures. I also studied more of them after this sighting and could never find anything that looked even remotely close.)

So...yeah...Wow. He surfaces..sort of does one of those "tail stand" things like you seel dolphins do. I literally ricked back against the railing. Jaw dropping. Let out an involuntary "what the fuc....?"

So after standing there for a moment--I was again called below. I go down the ladder of the sail to the Conn. My COB was waiting for me. Began to chew me out a bit for lollygagging. Then he stops and asks, "Drew--what the hell? You look like you just saw a ghost."

I began to explain..but then stopped. Knowing it was an outlandish sighting. I told my COB I thought I saw a whale off the port side, that's all.

So...that was I guess a very round about way of introducing my OP question here. Sapce travel has gotten far far more press and attention over the past decades than has Ocean Exploration. But..should we devote more time and money and research to Ocean Exploration> After all...the ocean covers 2/3rds of the Earth's surface. And when you do the math and figure it averages a couple miles in depth, and then figure the total square-miles......Wow again!

What discoveries may remain hidden there? Disease cures in the flora? DNA in fish that could give us new insights? As well as, of course, new life forms.

So who thinks that the Ocean is perhaps a more interesting and potentially more valuable field of exploration than Space? Are we ignoring for the most part what maybe really is the Last Frontier?

What say you?
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Saint_of_Me
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6/26/2015 4:17:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I must add....

When some of you read the locale of my Sea Creature sighting, it is inevitable, I think, that some Loch Ness Monster jokes are on the way. For this reason, I actually considered--briefly--fictitiously switching the locale to another p.o.c. I have made. Say.....Barcelona, Spain. Since, after all, the sighting was not that crucial to making my OP question. And was only an anecdote.

But in the end I decided to--for better or worse--relate the event as best and as accurately as I could, some 15 years later.

Drew.
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DanneJeRusse
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6/27/2015 9:28:44 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Maybe it was a dinosaur that got caught in the time machine you keep blathering about.
Marrying a 6 year old and waiting until she reaches puberty and maturity before having consensual sex is better than walking up to
a stranger in a bar and proceeding to have relations with no valid proof of the intent of the person. Muhammad wins. ~ Fatihah
If they don't want to be killed then they have to subdue to the Islamic laws. - Uncung
Without God, you are lower than sh!t. ~ SpiritandTruth
Saint_of_Me
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6/27/2015 3:02:53 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/27/2015 8:39:24 AM, dee-em wrote:
Beware the edge of the world. Thar be dragons there!

Indeed there may be!

The Sea is filled with creatures stranger than anything you guys could imagine. (Well, if you had imaginations, that is).

Like these guys........................https://www.youtube.com...

Also: please recall my primary OP question. It dealt with not my sighting on the Dallas, but rather as to the notion of increasing Deep Sea Exploration.

Thanks.
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DanneJeRusse
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6/27/2015 3:44:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/27/2015 3:02:53 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/27/2015 8:39:24 AM, dee-em wrote:
Beware the edge of the world. Thar be dragons there!

Indeed there may be!

The Sea is filled with creatures stranger than anything you guys could imagine. (Well, if you had imaginations, that is).

Like these guys........................https://www.youtube.com...

OMG! Goldfish! I've never seen those before. Thanks for educating me.


Also: please recall my primary OP question. It dealt with not my sighting on the Dallas, but rather as to the notion of increasing Deep Sea Exploration.

Thanks.
Marrying a 6 year old and waiting until she reaches puberty and maturity before having consensual sex is better than walking up to
a stranger in a bar and proceeding to have relations with no valid proof of the intent of the person. Muhammad wins. ~ Fatihah
If they don't want to be killed then they have to subdue to the Islamic laws. - Uncung
Without God, you are lower than sh!t. ~ SpiritandTruth
Saint_of_Me
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6/27/2015 3:46:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/27/2015 3:02:53 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/27/2015 8:39:24 AM, dee-em wrote:
Beware the edge of the world. Thar be dragons there!

Indeed there may be!

The Sea is filled with creatures stranger than anything you guys could imagine. (Well, if you had imaginations, that is).

Like these guys........................https://www.youtube.com...


Also: please recall my primary OP question. It dealt with not my sighting on the Dallas, but rather as to the notion of increasing Deep Sea Exploration.

Thanks.

And some more!

http://www.cracked.com...
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Saint_of_Me
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6/27/2015 3:50:52 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/27/2015 3:46:32 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/27/2015 3:02:53 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/27/2015 8:39:24 AM, dee-em wrote:
Beware the edge of the world. Thar be dragons there!

Indeed there may be!

The Sea is filled with creatures stranger than anything you guys could imagine. (Well, if you had imaginations, that is).

Like these guys........................https://www.youtube.com...


Also: please recall my primary OP question. It dealt with not my sighting on the Dallas, but rather as to the notion of increasing Deep Sea Exploration.

Thanks.




Ya know..........It has dawned on me after reviewing some of these creatures that the one I spotted of the Coast of Scotland was actually not all that bizarre-looking. Huge, yes? Fearsome? Certainly. And real? Without a doubt. But the sheer vastness of the sea would be so conducive to a mind-numbing variety of life, that it would be an anomaly to NOT see one. (For anybody who has spent a good deal of time on and IN the Oceans and Seas of the planet, that is.

Here's some more!


http://www.cracked.com...
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Vox_Veritas
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6/27/2015 3:57:53 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/26/2015 4:09:42 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
One time when I was in the Navy and serving on the USS Dallas, we were just getting underway, leaving the beautiful port of Holy Loch, Scotland. (My favorite place of anywhere we ever made a port-of-call.

I was topside, taking a last look at the mainland and the North Atlantic at sunrise, before we submerged. (In subs it is common practice to occasionally allow the crew members to go "up topside" to get some fresh air and take in some sights so as to get a brief hiatus from the confines of a football-length steel tube that spends weeks sometimes underwater. LOL. We do this in shifts--usually according to "divisions." Maybe 6-8 guys at a time. (More on a boomer).

So I was the last guy up there. Taking my time. I was called down below and lingered a bit..and I saw one of the strangest sights I ever have in my life. (Indeed: THEE strangest ever while at sea.)

OK skeptics...here we go! LOL. A sea creature...I don't know what else to call it. Rears-up at about 320 degrees to our post side. Probably about, oh, 40 meters away.
It was sort of the shape of a very large porpoise. But more elongated--so much so to begin taking on "snake" dimensions--, and about six times the size of a porpoise. Well, more, actually, I reckoned it to be about 50' long. But perhaps bigger since the tail end of it remained submerged.

It also had huge pectoral fins--red/purple in color; so big as to resemble wings. It had these as well on the dorsal area. And another smaller set about two-thirds down its body toward its tail. The primary color of the body of the creature was blue-gray.

He also had catfish like "whiskers" surrounding his snout and lower mouth. Huge fuckkkers--probably 8" wide and two feet long. Probably 6-8 of them. Then he submerges. I would say the total time I saw him was about five seconds. But, man: the light was good, the sun was behind me, and when he submerged he was within 20 meters or so.

(I am pretty familiar with most known ocean creatures. I also studied more of them after this sighting and could never find anything that looked even remotely close.)

So...yeah...Wow. He surfaces..sort of does one of those "tail stand" things like you seel dolphins do. I literally ricked back against the railing. Jaw dropping. Let out an involuntary "what the fuc....?"

So after standing there for a moment--I was again called below. I go down the ladder of the sail to the Conn. My COB was waiting for me. Began to chew me out a bit for lollygagging. Then he stops and asks, "Drew--what the hell? You look like you just saw a ghost."

I began to explain..but then stopped. Knowing it was an outlandish sighting. I told my COB I thought I saw a whale off the port side, that's all.

So...that was I guess a very round about way of introducing my OP question here. Sapce travel has gotten far far more press and attention over the past decades than has Ocean Exploration. But..should we devote more time and money and research to Ocean Exploration> After all...the ocean covers 2/3rds of the Earth's surface. And when you do the math and figure it averages a couple miles in depth, and then figure the total square-miles......Wow again!

What discoveries may remain hidden there? Disease cures in the flora? DNA in fish that could give us new insights? As well as, of course, new life forms.

So who thinks that the Ocean is perhaps a more interesting and potentially more valuable field of exploration than Space? Are we ignoring for the most part what maybe really is the Last Frontier?

What say you?

What year was this?
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Saint_of_Me
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6/27/2015 6:06:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/27/2015 3:57:53 PM, Vox_Veritas wrote:
At 6/26/2015 4:09:42 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
One time when I was in the Navy and serving on the USS Dallas, we were just getting underway, leaving the beautiful port of Holy Loch, Scotland. (My favorite place of anywhere we ever made a port-of-call.

I was topside, taking a last look at the mainland and the North Atlantic at sunrise, before we submerged. (In subs it is common practice to occasionally allow the crew members to go "up topside" to get some fresh air and take in some sights so as to get a brief hiatus from the confines of a football-length steel tube that spends weeks sometimes underwater. LOL. We do this in shifts--usually according to "divisions." Maybe 6-8 guys at a time. (More on a boomer).

So I was the last guy up there. Taking my time. I was called down below and lingered a bit..and I saw one of the strangest sights I ever have in my life. (Indeed: THEE strangest ever while at sea.)

OK skeptics...here we go! LOL. A sea creature...I don't know what else to call it. Rears-up at about 320 degrees to our post side. Probably about, oh, 40 meters away.
It was sort of the shape of a very large porpoise. But more elongated--so much so to begin taking on "snake" dimensions--, and about six times the size of a porpoise. Well, more, actually, I reckoned it to be about 50' long. But perhaps bigger since the tail end of it remained submerged.

It also had huge pectoral fins--red/purple in color; so big as to resemble wings. It had these as well on the dorsal area. And another smaller set about two-thirds down its body toward its tail. The primary color of the body of the creature was blue-gray.

He also had catfish like "whiskers" surrounding his snout and lower mouth. Huge fuckkkers--probably 8" wide and two feet long. Probably 6-8 of them. Then he submerges. I would say the total time I saw him was about five seconds. But, man: the light was good, the sun was behind me, and when he submerged he was within 20 meters or so.

(I am pretty familiar with most known ocean creatures. I also studied more of them after this sighting and could never find anything that looked even remotely close.)

So...yeah...Wow. He surfaces..sort of does one of those "tail stand" things like you seel dolphins do. I literally ricked back against the railing. Jaw dropping. Let out an involuntary "what the fuc....?"

So after standing there for a moment--I was again called below. I go down the ladder of the sail to the Conn. My COB was waiting for me. Began to chew me out a bit for lollygagging. Then he stops and asks, "Drew--what the hell? You look like you just saw a ghost."

I began to explain..but then stopped. Knowing it was an outlandish sighting. I told my COB I thought I saw a whale off the port side, that's all.

So...that was I guess a very round about way of introducing my OP question here. Sapce travel has gotten far far more press and attention over the past decades than has Ocean Exploration. But..should we devote more time and money and research to Ocean Exploration> After all...the ocean covers 2/3rds of the Earth's surface. And when you do the math and figure it averages a couple miles in depth, and then figure the total square-miles......Wow again!

What discoveries may remain hidden there? Disease cures in the flora? DNA in fish that could give us new insights? As well as, of course, new life forms.

So who thinks that the Ocean is perhaps a more interesting and potentially more valuable field of exploration than Space? Are we ignoring for the most part what maybe really is the Last Frontier?

What say you?

What year was this?

Fall of 1998. Early October, I believe. Actually after the Holy Loch Sub base was closed to regular SUB traffic. We originally "put in" due to a malfunctioning warning light on our SG6.
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Otokage
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6/28/2015 5:00:55 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/26/2015 4:09:42 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
One time when I was in the Navy and serving on the USS Dallas, we were just getting underway, leaving the beautiful port of Holy Loch, Scotland. (My favorite place of anywhere we ever made a port-of-call.

I was topside, taking a last look at the mainland and the North Atlantic at sunrise, before we submerged. (In subs it is common practice to occasionally allow the crew members to go "up topside" to get some fresh air and take in some sights so as to get a brief hiatus from the confines of a football-length steel tube that spends weeks sometimes underwater. LOL. We do this in shifts--usually according to "divisions." Maybe 6-8 guys at a time. (More on a boomer).

So I was the last guy up there. Taking my time. I was called down below and lingered a bit..and I saw one of the strangest sights I ever have in my life. (Indeed: THEE strangest ever while at sea.)

OK skeptics...here we go! LOL. A sea creature...I don't know what else to call it. Rears-up at about 320 degrees to our post side. Probably about, oh, 40 meters away.
It was sort of the shape of a very large porpoise. But more elongated--so much so to begin taking on "snake" dimensions--, and about six times the size of a porpoise. Well, more, actually, I reckoned it to be about 50' long. But perhaps bigger since the tail end of it remained submerged.

It also had huge pectoral fins--red/purple in color; so big as to resemble wings. It had these as well on the dorsal area. And another smaller set about two-thirds down its body toward its tail. The primary color of the body of the creature was blue-gray.

He also had catfish like "whiskers" surrounding his snout and lower mouth. Huge fuckkkers--probably 8" wide and two feet long. Probably 6-8 of them. Then he submerges. I would say the total time I saw him was about five seconds. But, man: the light was good, the sun was behind me, and when he submerged he was within 20 meters or so.

(I am pretty familiar with most known ocean creatures. I also studied more of them after this sighting and could never find anything that looked even remotely close.)

So...yeah...Wow. He surfaces..sort of does one of those "tail stand" things like you seel dolphins do. I literally ricked back against the railing. Jaw dropping. Let out an involuntary "what the fuc....?"

So after standing there for a moment--I was again called below. I go down the ladder of the sail to the Conn. My COB was waiting for me. Began to chew me out a bit for lollygagging. Then he stops and asks, "Drew--what the hell? You look like you just saw a ghost."

I began to explain..but then stopped. Knowing it was an outlandish sighting. I told my COB I thought I saw a whale off the port side, that's all.

So...that was I guess a very round about way of introducing my OP question here. Sapce travel has gotten far far more press and attention over the past decades than has Ocean Exploration. But..should we devote more time and money and research to Ocean Exploration> After all...the ocean covers 2/3rds of the Earth's surface. And when you do the math and figure it averages a couple miles in depth, and then figure the total square-miles......Wow again!

What discoveries may remain hidden there? Disease cures in the flora? DNA in fish that could give us new insights? As well as, of course, new life forms.

So who thinks that the Ocean is perhaps a more interesting and potentially more valuable field of exploration than Space? Are we ignoring for the most part what maybe really is the Last Frontier?

What say you?

About your sight, I can only say that 1) the water must have been dark, since a creature of those dimensions could only live in the pelagic, and 2) for being so dark, it is akward that you can describe the creature with precission, specialy the colors and even its ventral part (fins, etc.), and this seeing it just a few seconds. All this makes me think that either you didn't see anything, or either you saw a common whale and you are adorning the sighting to give it a little drama, like any sailor would do :).

As for your question, I too think we need to explore the oceans in depth. It is said 90% of the hydrosphere is not explored, so imagine what kind of things could live there, specialy in the abyssal area, that must be home to the weirdest creatures, although I doubt they can be as big as a whale :) those ecosystems are too unproductive to sustent animals with such biomass, even real whales, big sharks, etc, can not live there for long and need to move to the surface to eat.
Saint_of_Me
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6/28/2015 3:14:16 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/28/2015 5:00:55 AM, Otokage wrote:
At 6/26/2015 4:09:42 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
One time when I was in the Navy and serving on the USS Dallas, we were just getting underway, leaving the beautiful port of Holy Loch, Scotland. (My favorite place of anywhere we ever made a port-of-call.

I was topside, taking a last look at the mainland and the North Atlantic at sunrise, before we submerged. (In subs it is common practice to occasionally allow the crew members to go "up topside" to get some fresh air and take in some sights so as to get a brief hiatus from the confines of a football-length steel tube that spends weeks sometimes underwater. LOL. We do this in shifts--usually according to "divisions." Maybe 6-8 guys at a time. (More on a boomer).

So I was the last guy up there. Taking my time. I was called down below and lingered a bit..and I saw one of the strangest sights I ever have in my life. (Indeed: THEE strangest ever while at sea.)

OK skeptics...here we go! LOL. A sea creature...I don't know what else to call it. Rears-up at about 320 degrees to our post side. Probably about, oh, 40 meters away.
It was sort of the shape of a very large porpoise. But more elongated--so much so to begin taking on "snake" dimensions--, and about six times the size of a porpoise. Well, more, actually, I reckoned it to be about 50' long. But perhaps bigger since the tail end of it remained submerged.

It also had huge pectoral fins--red/purple in color; so big as to resemble wings. It had these as well on the dorsal area. And another smaller set about two-thirds down its body toward its tail. The primary color of the body of the creature was blue-gray.

He also had catfish like "whiskers" surrounding his snout and lower mouth. Huge fuckkkers--probably 8" wide and two feet long. Probably 6-8 of them. Then he submerges. I would say the total time I saw him was about five seconds. But, man: the light was good, the sun was behind me, and when he submerged he was within 20 meters or so.

(I am pretty familiar with most known ocean creatures. I also studied more of them after this sighting and could never find anything that looked even remotely close.)

So...yeah...Wow. He surfaces..sort of does one of those "tail stand" things like you seel dolphins do. I literally ricked back against the railing. Jaw dropping. Let out an involuntary "what the fuc....?"

So after standing there for a moment--I was again called below. I go down the ladder of the sail to the Conn. My COB was waiting for me. Began to chew me out a bit for lollygagging. Then he stops and asks, "Drew--what the hell? You look like you just saw a ghost."

I began to explain..but then stopped. Knowing it was an outlandish sighting. I told my COB I thought I saw a whale off the port side, that's all.

So...that was I guess a very round about way of introducing my OP question here. Sapce travel has gotten far far more press and attention over the past decades than has Ocean Exploration. But..should we devote more time and money and research to Ocean Exploration> After all...the ocean covers 2/3rds of the Earth's surface. And when you do the math and figure it averages a couple miles in depth, and then figure the total square-miles......Wow again!

What discoveries may remain hidden there? Disease cures in the flora? DNA in fish that could give us new insights? As well as, of course, new life forms.

So who thinks that the Ocean is perhaps a more interesting and potentially more valuable field of exploration than Space? Are we ignoring for the most part what maybe really is the Last Frontier?

What say you?

About your sight, I can only say that 1) the water must have been dark, since a creature of those dimensions could only live in the pelagic, and 2) for being so dark, it is akward that you can describe the creature with precission, specialy the colors and even its ventral part (fins, etc.), and this seeing it just a few seconds. All this makes me think that either you didn't see anything, or either you saw a common whale and you are adorning the sighting to give it a little drama, like any sailor would do :).

As for your question, I too think we need to explore the oceans in depth. It is said 90% of the hydrosphere is not explored, so imagine what kind of things could live there, specialy in the abyssal area, that must be home to the weirdest creatures, although I doubt they can be as big as a whale :) those ecosystems are too unproductive to sustent animals with such biomass, even real whales, big sharks, etc, can not live there for long and need to move to the surface to eat.

Thanks! Yeah...the ocean is very dark up around those parts--near the Scottish coast. Especially in Fall, and in early morning.

I also think we owe it to ourselves to explore the Sea much more. After all, we all came from the sea. it is our Mother, of sorts. It may hold discoveries that can significantly benefit mankind. (the cure for cancer? perhaps it exists as an extract of some form of flora, like Seaweed. (Which, btw--has been already shown to posses many health bennies.
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Saint_of_Me
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6/28/2015 4:29:55 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I pasted this from a website that listed the "Top 20 Questions Science Has Not Answered"--where they listed "What Lies at the Bottom of the Ocean?" as #15.

What's at the bottom of the ocean?
Ninety-five per cent of the ocean is unexplored. What's down there? In 1960, Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard travelled seven miles down, to the deepest part of the ocean, in search of answers. Their voyage pushed the boundaries of human endeavour but gave them only a glimpse of life on the seafloor. It's so difficult getting to the bottom of the ocean that for the most part we have to resort to sending unmanned vehicles as scouts. The discoveries we've made so far " from bizarre fish such as the barreleye, with its transparent head, to a potential treatment for Alzheimer's made by crustaceans " are a tiny fraction of the strange world hidden below the waves.

So...when I read about the "barreleye" I had to look it up, so as to add it to my previous list of Strange Creatures from the Deep.

Here he can be seen!

https://www.google.com...
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tkubok
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6/29/2015 9:47:46 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/28/2015 4:29:55 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
I pasted this from a website that listed the "Top 20 Questions Science Has Not Answered"--where they listed "What Lies at the Bottom of the Ocean?" as #15.

What's at the bottom of the ocean?
Ninety-five per cent of the ocean is unexplored. What's down there? In 1960, Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard travelled seven miles down, to the deepest part of the ocean, in search of answers. Their voyage pushed the boundaries of human endeavour but gave them only a glimpse of life on the seafloor. It's so difficult getting to the bottom of the ocean that for the most part we have to resort to sending unmanned vehicles as scouts. The discoveries we've made so far " from bizarre fish such as the barreleye, with its transparent head, to a potential treatment for Alzheimer's made by crustaceans " are a tiny fraction of the strange world hidden below the waves.

So...when I read about the "barreleye" I had to look it up, so as to add it to my previous list of Strange Creatures from the Deep.

Here he can be seen!

https://www.google.com...

Maybe there are aliens in the ocean.
Saint_of_Me
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6/29/2015 12:14:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/29/2015 9:47:46 AM, tkubok wrote:
At 6/28/2015 4:29:55 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
I pasted this from a website that listed the "Top 20 Questions Science Has Not Answered"--where they listed "What Lies at the Bottom of the Ocean?" as #15.

What's at the bottom of the ocean?
Ninety-five per cent of the ocean is unexplored. What's down there? In 1960, Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard travelled seven miles down, to the deepest part of the ocean, in search of answers. Their voyage pushed the boundaries of human endeavour but gave them only a glimpse of life on the seafloor. It's so difficult getting to the bottom of the ocean that for the most part we have to resort to sending unmanned vehicles as scouts. The discoveries we've made so far " from bizarre fish such as the barreleye, with its transparent head, to a potential treatment for Alzheimer's made by crustaceans " are a tiny fraction of the strange world hidden below the waves.

So...when I read about the "barreleye" I had to look it up, so as to add it to my previous list of Strange Creatures from the Deep.

Here he can be seen!

https://www.google.com...

Maybe there are aliens in the ocean.

Sure. There is certainly new life forms that thus far our "alien" to us. That is part of my OP reasons for furthering exploration of it. Thanks!
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.