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Golden mean found in quantum world

janesix
Posts: 3,439
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7/11/2015 12:05:04 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I know this is an old article, but I just found it and thought it was very interesting and worth discussion. Phi is found all over nature, so why not in the quantum world too?

http://www.sciencedaily.com...

By tuning the system and artificially introducing more quantum uncertainty the researchers observed that the chain of atoms acts like a nanoscale guitar string. Dr. Radu Coldea from Oxford University, who is the principal author of the paper and drove the international project from its inception a decade ago until the present, explains: "Here the tension comes from the interaction between spins causing them to magnetically resonate. For these interactions we found a series (scale) of resonant notes: The first two notes show a perfect relationship with each other. Their frequencies (pitch) are in the ratio of 1.618", which is the golden ratio famous from art and architecture."
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
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7/11/2015 5:29:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/11/2015 12:05:04 PM, janesix wrote:
I know this is an old article, but I just found it and thought it was very interesting and worth discussion. Phi is found all over nature, so why not in the quantum world too?

http://www.sciencedaily.com...

By tuning the system and artificially introducing more quantum uncertainty the researchers observed that the chain of atoms acts like a nanoscale guitar string. Dr. Radu Coldea from Oxford University, who is the principal author of the paper and drove the international project from its inception a decade ago until the present, explains: "Here the tension comes from the interaction between spins causing them to magnetically resonate. For these interactions we found a series (scale) of resonant notes: The first two notes show a perfect relationship with each other. Their frequencies (pitch) are in the ratio of 1.618", which is the golden ratio famous from art and architecture."

Very Intriguing! I personally like this idea. I have always thought that the old saying "As above, so below" has some scientific merit. And the fact that we have now observed the Golden Mean--and the Fibonacci Sequences--in both the sub-atomic and the Cosmological World--certainly seem to bode well for the veracity of that adage.

Here are some other places in nature where you can see the Golden Mean (1.62) as well as Fibo Sequences.............http://io9.com...
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
tejretics
Posts: 6,083
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7/13/2015 11:25:50 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/11/2015 12:05:04 PM, janesix wrote:
I know this is an old article, but I just found it and thought it was very interesting and worth discussion. Phi is found all over nature, so why not in the quantum world too?

http://www.sciencedaily.com...

By tuning the system and artificially introducing more quantum uncertainty the researchers observed that the chain of atoms acts like a nanoscale guitar string. Dr. Radu Coldea from Oxford University, who is the principal author of the paper and drove the international project from its inception a decade ago until the present, explains: "Here the tension comes from the interaction between spins causing them to magnetically resonate. For these interactions we found a series (scale) of resonant notes: The first two notes show a perfect relationship with each other. Their frequencies (pitch) are in the ratio of 1.618", which is the golden ratio famous from art and architecture."

Interesting. I have always been fascinated by the nature of the golden ratio.
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