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A visual example that String Theory is real?

Saint_of_Me
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7/13/2015 7:46:34 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I was reading a book last night entitled "Sacred Geometry." In it there was a chapter on Acoustics; specifically, the beautiful symmetrical and complex patters that sound waves can generate.

One of the ways in which we can actually see these "wave forms" (since they are usually of course merely invisible waves or air pressure) is through the use of what are called "Chladni Plates." Named after the German physicist and musician who has been called the Father of Acoustics. He did most of his lasting and most important work right the beginning of the 19th Century. (His last name is pronounced "Klod-nee")

You will see a couple of examples of Chladni Plates in my link. It shows what happens when a violin bow, or other type of musical vibration, is applied to a steel plate on which sits some visible particulate matter. Such as salt, or sand.

But before you go to the link, here is the idea that occurred to me when I first saw some Chlodni plates: the patterns created remind me of the wave-form patterns we see in quantum particles. Quantum Mechanics. What with the "probability clouds" that QM guys think electrons actually comprise. (As opposed to those old "orbits" we knew from the classical model, back in the day)

So...in turn I wondered: does this perhaps lend some credence to the whole idea of String Theory. After all, it is a string (violin bow) that caused the vibration on the plate. String Theory holds that particles are actually comprised of vibrating strings. And the different frequencies of the strings make for different particles. Different atoms, and elements.

I do not know if I am comprehending this visual correctly. Or formulating my question in correct QM terms. But it seems that maybe the pattern on these Chladni Plates could be some sort of a "reverse engineering" for the existence of String Theory? IN that we see what looks like a Quantum Probability cloud from acoustic vibrations. So does this propose a chance that the reverse holds? That the smallest sub-atomic particles are themselves "vibrating strings?"

I am interested in what you guys think of this. Also look at some more images of Chladni plates. I believe the resemblance to QM particles is remarkable. What say you?

Thank You!

http://makezine.com...
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
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7/14/2015 12:59:43 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I Googled some pics of what proposed atoms and particles might look like if ST actually holds true. Compare them with Chladni Plate pics!

https://www.google.com...
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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7/14/2015 1:04:00 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/13/2015 7:46:34 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
I was reading a book last night entitled "Sacred Geometry." In it there was a chapter on Acoustics; specifically, the beautiful symmetrical and complex patters that sound waves can generate.

One of the ways in which we can actually see these "wave forms" (since they are usually of course merely invisible waves or air pressure) is through the use of what are called "Chladni Plates." Named after the German physicist and musician who has been called the Father of Acoustics. He did most of his lasting and most important work right the beginning of the 19th Century. (His last name is pronounced "Klod-nee")

You will see a couple of examples of Chladni Plates in my link. It shows what happens when a violin bow, or other type of musical vibration, is applied to a steel plate on which sits some visible particulate matter. Such as salt, or sand.

But before you go to the link, here is the idea that occurred to me when I first saw some Chlodni plates: the patterns created remind me of the wave-form patterns we see in quantum particles. Quantum Mechanics. What with the "probability clouds" that QM guys think electrons actually comprise. (As opposed to those old "orbits" we knew from the classical model, back in the day)

So...in turn I wondered: does this perhaps lend some credence to the whole idea of String Theory. After all, it is a string (violin bow) that caused the vibration on the plate. String Theory holds that particles are actually comprised of vibrating strings. And the different frequencies of the strings make for different particles. Different atoms, and elements.

I do not know if I am comprehending this visual correctly. Or formulating my question in correct QM terms. But it seems that maybe the pattern on these Chladni Plates could be some sort of a "reverse engineering" for the existence of String Theory? IN that we see what looks like a Quantum Probability cloud from acoustic vibrations. So does this propose a chance that the reverse holds? That the smallest sub-atomic particles are themselves "vibrating strings?"

I am interested in what you guys think of this. Also look at some more images of Chladni plates. I believe the resemblance to QM particles is remarkable. What say you?

Thank You!

http://makezine.com...

Passing waveforms into certain kinds of media (not just plates, but more elastic membranes as well), causing them to vibrate, causes the formation of visual wave patterns and other neat-looking patterns on said plate/membrane. But what is the part that is mysterious, or interesting, or not understood, and how does it relate to string theory or quantum mechanics?
Saint_of_Me
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7/14/2015 1:06:01 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 1:04:00 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/13/2015 7:46:34 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
I was reading a book last night entitled "Sacred Geometry." In it there was a chapter on Acoustics; specifically, the beautiful symmetrical and complex patters that sound waves can generate.

One of the ways in which we can actually see these "wave forms" (since they are usually of course merely invisible waves or air pressure) is through the use of what are called "Chladni Plates." Named after the German physicist and musician who has been called the Father of Acoustics. He did most of his lasting and most important work right the beginning of the 19th Century. (His last name is pronounced "Klod-nee")

You will see a couple of examples of Chladni Plates in my link. It shows what happens when a violin bow, or other type of musical vibration, is applied to a steel plate on which sits some visible particulate matter. Such as salt, or sand.

But before you go to the link, here is the idea that occurred to me when I first saw some Chlodni plates: the patterns created remind me of the wave-form patterns we see in quantum particles. Quantum Mechanics. What with the "probability clouds" that QM guys think electrons actually comprise. (As opposed to those old "orbits" we knew from the classical model, back in the day)

So...in turn I wondered: does this perhaps lend some credence to the whole idea of String Theory. After all, it is a string (violin bow) that caused the vibration on the plate. String Theory holds that particles are actually comprised of vibrating strings. And the different frequencies of the strings make for different particles. Different atoms, and elements.

I do not know if I am comprehending this visual correctly. Or formulating my question in correct QM terms. But it seems that maybe the pattern on these Chladni Plates could be some sort of a "reverse engineering" for the existence of String Theory? IN that we see what looks like a Quantum Probability cloud from acoustic vibrations. So does this propose a chance that the reverse holds? That the smallest sub-atomic particles are themselves "vibrating strings?"

I am interested in what you guys think of this. Also look at some more images of Chladni plates. I believe the resemblance to QM particles is remarkable. What say you?

Thank You!

http://makezine.com...

Passing waveforms into certain kinds of media (not just plates, but more elastic membranes as well), causing them to vibrate, causes the formation of visual wave patterns and other neat-looking patterns on said plate/membrane. But what is the part that is mysterious, or interesting, or not understood, and how does it relate to string theory or quantum mechanics?

Wow. Did you read my OP???
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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7/14/2015 1:20:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 1:06:01 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 1:04:00 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/13/2015 7:46:34 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
I was reading a book last night entitled "Sacred Geometry." In it there was a chapter on Acoustics; specifically, the beautiful symmetrical and complex patters that sound waves can generate.

One of the ways in which we can actually see these "wave forms" (since they are usually of course merely invisible waves or air pressure) is through the use of what are called "Chladni Plates." Named after the German physicist and musician who has been called the Father of Acoustics. He did most of his lasting and most important work right the beginning of the 19th Century. (His last name is pronounced "Klod-nee")

You will see a couple of examples of Chladni Plates in my link. It shows what happens when a violin bow, or other type of musical vibration, is applied to a steel plate on which sits some visible particulate matter. Such as salt, or sand.

But before you go to the link, here is the idea that occurred to me when I first saw some Chlodni plates: the patterns created remind me of the wave-form patterns we see in quantum particles. Quantum Mechanics. What with the "probability clouds" that QM guys think electrons actually comprise. (As opposed to those old "orbits" we knew from the classical model, back in the day)

So...in turn I wondered: does this perhaps lend some credence to the whole idea of String Theory. After all, it is a string (violin bow) that caused the vibration on the plate. String Theory holds that particles are actually comprised of vibrating strings. And the different frequencies of the strings make for different particles. Different atoms, and elements.

I do not know if I am comprehending this visual correctly. Or formulating my question in correct QM terms. But it seems that maybe the pattern on these Chladni Plates could be some sort of a "reverse engineering" for the existence of String Theory? IN that we see what looks like a Quantum Probability cloud from acoustic vibrations. So does this propose a chance that the reverse holds? That the smallest sub-atomic particles are themselves "vibrating strings?"

I am interested in what you guys think of this. Also look at some more images of Chladni plates. I believe the resemblance to QM particles is remarkable. What say you?

Thank You!

http://makezine.com...

Passing waveforms into certain kinds of media (not just plates, but more elastic membranes as well), causing them to vibrate, causes the formation of visual wave patterns and other neat-looking patterns on said plate/membrane. But what is the part that is mysterious, or interesting, or not understood, and how does it relate to string theory or quantum mechanics?

Wow. Did you read my OP???

I did. The only proposed connection I noticed was an implied analogy (or maybe metaphor, really) based on two things that sort of look similar to the eye.

I'm not sure if there's more to it than that presented in your OP?
kp98
Posts: 729
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7/14/2015 2:50:25 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Chladni figures are a good way of visualising the thoroughly old-fashioned and classical phenomenon of standing waves. Standing waves are perhaps the best way to introduce the idea of quantisation, because they do exhibit non-contintuity, but I have no idea how an electron as one form of vibration of a string and a proton is different 'harmonic' is helpful in understanding anything - if that is what string thery is about.

It probably isn't what it is about, because I freely admit I haven't got a clue about string theory. Apparently string theory predicts the existence of gravity (or is it Higgs particles?), but I defy anybody on this board to explain to me how that is supposed to work!

I'd say Chandi figures show that not every phenomenon in nature is continuous and that is the usefuk pedological first step in realising classical physics is not the whole story, but they don't do much more than that.
Saint_of_Me
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7/14/2015 3:56:03 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 1:20:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/14/2015 1:06:01 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 1:04:00 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/13/2015 7:46:34 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
I was reading a book last night entitled "Sacred Geometry." In it there was a chapter on Acoustics; specifically, the beautiful symmetrical and complex patters that sound waves can generate.

One of the ways in which we can actually see these "wave forms" (since they are usually of course merely invisible waves or air pressure) is through the use of what are called "Chladni Plates." Named after the German physicist and musician who has been called the Father of Acoustics. He did most of his lasting and most important work right the beginning of the 19th Century. (His last name is pronounced "Klod-nee")

You will see a couple of examples of Chladni Plates in my link. It shows what happens when a violin bow, or other type of musical vibration, is applied to a steel plate on which sits some visible particulate matter. Such as salt, or sand.

But before you go to the link, here is the idea that occurred to me when I first saw some Chlodni plates: the patterns created remind me of the wave-form patterns we see in quantum particles. Quantum Mechanics. What with the "probability clouds" that QM guys think electrons actually comprise. (As opposed to those old "orbits" we knew from the classical model, back in the day)

So...in turn I wondered: does this perhaps lend some credence to the whole idea of String Theory. After all, it is a string (violin bow) that caused the vibration on the plate. String Theory holds that particles are actually comprised of vibrating strings. And the different frequencies of the strings make for different particles. Different atoms, and elements.

I do not know if I am comprehending this visual correctly. Or formulating my question in correct QM terms. But it seems that maybe the pattern on these Chladni Plates could be some sort of a "reverse engineering" for the existence of String Theory? IN that we see what looks like a Quantum Probability cloud from acoustic vibrations. So does this propose a chance that the reverse holds? That the smallest sub-atomic particles are themselves "vibrating strings?"

I am interested in what you guys think of this. Also look at some more images of Chladni plates. I believe the resemblance to QM particles is remarkable. What say you?

Thank You!

http://makezine.com...

Passing waveforms into certain kinds of media (not just plates, but more elastic membranes as well), causing them to vibrate, causes the formation of visual wave patterns and other neat-looking patterns on said plate/membrane. But what is the part that is mysterious, or interesting, or not understood, and how does it relate to string theory or quantum mechanics?

Wow. Did you read my OP???

I did. The only proposed connection I noticed was an implied analogy (or maybe metaphor, really) based on two things that sort of look similar to the eye.

I'm not sure if there's more to it than that presented in your OP?

Well, no. Not really. I was simply intrigued by the similarity of the patterns on the Chladni plates with the waveform patterns of proposed String Theory particles. Specifically, the electron probability clouds. And then I took my idea a step further when considering that since the Chladni plate I first saw in the book was caused by a violin string being bowed across it, that this showed string-induced vibrations look like QM particles. So perhaps the reverse is true: that String Theory would be rendered more probable. By dint of said ST particles being composed of strings.

I may have made a jump in my linear thinking here, however. And was simply struck by the visual similarities of the two. I can't seem to be able to effectively word the connecting hypothesis--of the string-caused Chladni pattern and the QM partical wave form. I will have to work on it some more.
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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7/14/2015 4:11:48 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 3:56:03 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 1:20:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/14/2015 1:06:01 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 1:04:00 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/13/2015 7:46:34 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
I was reading a book last night entitled "Sacred Geometry." In it there was a chapter on Acoustics; specifically, the beautiful symmetrical and complex patters that sound waves can generate.

One of the ways in which we can actually see these "wave forms" (since they are usually of course merely invisible waves or air pressure) is through the use of what are called "Chladni Plates." Named after the German physicist and musician who has been called the Father of Acoustics. He did most of his lasting and most important work right the beginning of the 19th Century. (His last name is pronounced "Klod-nee")

You will see a couple of examples of Chladni Plates in my link. It shows what happens when a violin bow, or other type of musical vibration, is applied to a steel plate on which sits some visible particulate matter. Such as salt, or sand.

But before you go to the link, here is the idea that occurred to me when I first saw some Chlodni plates: the patterns created remind me of the wave-form patterns we see in quantum particles. Quantum Mechanics. What with the "probability clouds" that QM guys think electrons actually comprise. (As opposed to those old "orbits" we knew from the classical model, back in the day)

So...in turn I wondered: does this perhaps lend some credence to the whole idea of String Theory. After all, it is a string (violin bow) that caused the vibration on the plate. String Theory holds that particles are actually comprised of vibrating strings. And the different frequencies of the strings make for different particles. Different atoms, and elements.

I do not know if I am comprehending this visual correctly. Or formulating my question in correct QM terms. But it seems that maybe the pattern on these Chladni Plates could be some sort of a "reverse engineering" for the existence of String Theory? IN that we see what looks like a Quantum Probability cloud from acoustic vibrations. So does this propose a chance that the reverse holds? That the smallest sub-atomic particles are themselves "vibrating strings?"

I am interested in what you guys think of this. Also look at some more images of Chladni plates. I believe the resemblance to QM particles is remarkable. What say you?

Thank You!

http://makezine.com...

Passing waveforms into certain kinds of media (not just plates, but more elastic membranes as well), causing them to vibrate, causes the formation of visual wave patterns and other neat-looking patterns on said plate/membrane. But what is the part that is mysterious, or interesting, or not understood, and how does it relate to string theory or quantum mechanics?

Wow. Did you read my OP???

I did. The only proposed connection I noticed was an implied analogy (or maybe metaphor, really) based on two things that sort of look similar to the eye.

I'm not sure if there's more to it than that presented in your OP?

Well, no. Not really. I was simply intrigued by the similarity of the patterns on the Chladni plates with the waveform patterns of proposed String Theory particles. Specifically, the electron probability clouds. And then I took my idea a step further when considering that since the Chladni plate I first saw in the book was caused by a violin string being bowed across it, that this showed string-induced vibrations look like QM particles. So perhaps the reverse is true: that String Theory would be rendered more probable. By dint of said ST particles being composed of strings.

Well, no, because even if we assumed that "string" and "vibration" had the same context (let's go much further and assume these are the same), and then if we assume that the similarity observed provides evidence (though it doesn't seem that it actually does), P(X|Z) > P(X) still does not imply that P(Z|X) > P(Z).

I may have made a jump in my linear thinking here, however. And was simply struck by the visual similarities of the two. I can't seem to be able to effectively word the connecting hypothesis--of the string-caused Chladni pattern and the QM partical wave form. I will have to work on it some more.

You may have made an intuitive leap, but linearity would not seem to have impact on the result.

If you can come up with a hypothesis, let's take a closer look at it =)
Saint_of_Me
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7/14/2015 4:15:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 4:11:48 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/14/2015 3:56:03 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 1:20:21 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/14/2015 1:06:01 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 1:04:00 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/13/2015 7:46:34 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
I was reading a book last night entitled "Sacred Geometry." In it there was a chapter on Acoustics; specifically, the beautiful symmetrical and complex patters that sound waves can generate.

One of the ways in which we can actually see these "wave forms" (since they are usually of course merely invisible waves or air pressure) is through the use of what are called "Chladni Plates." Named after the German physicist and musician who has been called the Father of Acoustics. He did most of his lasting and most important work right the beginning of the 19th Century. (His last name is pronounced "Klod-nee")

You will see a couple of examples of Chladni Plates in my link. It shows what happens when a violin bow, or other type of musical vibration, is applied to a steel plate on which sits some visible particulate matter. Such as salt, or sand.

But before you go to the link, here is the idea that occurred to me when I first saw some Chlodni plates: the patterns created remind me of the wave-form patterns we see in quantum particles. Quantum Mechanics. What with the "probability clouds" that QM guys think electrons actually comprise. (As opposed to those old "orbits" we knew from the classical model, back in the day)

So...in turn I wondered: does this perhaps lend some credence to the whole idea of String Theory. After all, it is a string (violin bow) that caused the vibration on the plate. String Theory holds that particles are actually comprised of vibrating strings. And the different frequencies of the strings make for different particles. Different atoms, and elements.

I do not know if I am comprehending this visual correctly. Or formulating my question in correct QM terms. But it seems that maybe the pattern on these Chladni Plates could be some sort of a "reverse engineering" for the existence of String Theory? IN that we see what looks like a Quantum Probability cloud from acoustic vibrations. So does this propose a chance that the reverse holds? That the smallest sub-atomic particles are themselves "vibrating strings?"

I am interested in what you guys think of this. Also look at some more images of Chladni plates. I believe the resemblance to QM particles is remarkable. What say you?

Thank You!

http://makezine.com...

Passing waveforms into certain kinds of media (not just plates, but more elastic membranes as well), causing them to vibrate, causes the formation of visual wave patterns and other neat-looking patterns on said plate/membrane. But what is the part that is mysterious, or interesting, or not understood, and how does it relate to string theory or quantum mechanics?

Wow. Did you read my OP???

I did. The only proposed connection I noticed was an implied analogy (or maybe metaphor, really) based on two things that sort of look similar to the eye.

I'm not sure if there's more to it than that presented in your OP?

Well, no. Not really. I was simply intrigued by the similarity of the patterns on the Chladni plates with the waveform patterns of proposed String Theory particles. Specifically, the electron probability clouds. And then I took my idea a step further when considering that since the Chladni plate I first saw in the book was caused by a violin string being bowed across it, that this showed string-induced vibrations look like QM particles. So perhaps the reverse is true: that String Theory would be rendered more probable. By dint of said ST particles being composed of strings.

Well, no, because even if we assumed that "string" and "vibration" had the same context (let's go much further and assume these are the same), and then if we assume that the similarity observed provides evidence (though it doesn't seem that it actually does), P(X|Z) > P(X) still does not imply that P(Z|X) > P(Z).

I may have made a jump in my linear thinking here, however. And was simply struck by the visual similarities of the two. I can't seem to be able to effectively word the connecting hypothesis--of the string-caused Chladni pattern and the QM partical wave form. I will have to work on it some more.

You may have made an intuitive leap, but linearity would not seem to have impact on the result.

If you can come up with a hypothesis, let's take a closer look at it =)

Will do! You'll be the first to know, amigo. LOL
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Saint_of_Me
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7/14/2015 8:51:35 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 4:44:23 PM, janesix wrote:
https://www.youtube.com...

This one I find even more interesting. The sound vibrations create what resembles living, moving organisms.

Wow..that was a great video! Thanks.

And at 2:08 into it, those shapes especially reminded me of my previously-mentioned QM particle wave-forms. So, if a particular sound, in this case a high-frequency signal, can generate such symmetry as we see in most of the cymatic patterns from the video, it begs the question: Are not all primary apsects, components, of the Natural world symmetrical at their core?

Pythagoras had a fascination with symmetry. He saw it of frequencies, in music, and of course in his geometry. He did not have the requisite optical equipment like telescopes in is day, but he also speculated on the idea of the planets and the entire Cosmos possessing the beauty and simplicity of Symmetry. I believe he called this "The Music of the Spheres."

So we now see the adage "As above, so Below" actually has some scientific merit to it. Although this is by no means a scientific argument for String Theory, as I am probably speaking mostly of aesthetics here, I would like to think that this still maybe adds a grain of possibility to the whole String Theory argument.

Was that guy way ahead of his time??

https://spacezilotes.wordpress.com...
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
janesix
Posts: 3,466
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7/14/2015 8:57:06 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 8:51:35 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 4:44:23 PM, janesix wrote:
https://www.youtube.com...

This one I find even more interesting. The sound vibrations create what resembles living, moving organisms.

Wow..that was a great video! Thanks.

And at 2:08 into it, those shapes especially reminded me of my previously-mentioned QM particle wave-forms. So, if a particular sound, in this case a high-frequency signal, can generate such symmetry as we see in most of the cymatic patterns from the video, it begs the question: Are not all primary apsects, components, of the Natural world symmetrical at their core?

Pythagoras had a fascination with symmetry. He saw it of frequencies, in music, and of course in his geometry. He did not have the requisite optical equipment like telescopes in is day, but he also speculated on the idea of the planets and the entire Cosmos possessing the beauty and simplicity of Symmetry. I believe he called this "The Music of the Spheres."

So we now see the adage "As above, so Below" actually has some scientific merit to it. Although this is by no means a scientific argument for String Theory, as I am probably speaking mostly of aesthetics here, I would like to think that this still maybe adds a grain of possibility to the whole String Theory argument.

Was that guy way ahead of his time??

https://spacezilotes.wordpress.com...

Off-topic, but maybe that's what morphogenic fields are composed of. Your vibrating strings.
Saint_of_Me
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7/14/2015 8:59:23 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 8:57:06 PM, janesix wrote:
At 7/14/2015 8:51:35 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 4:44:23 PM, janesix wrote:
https://www.youtube.com...

This one I find even more interesting. The sound vibrations create what resembles living, moving organisms.

Wow..that was a great video! Thanks.

And at 2:08 into it, those shapes especially reminded me of my previously-mentioned QM particle wave-forms. So, if a particular sound, in this case a high-frequency signal, can generate such symmetry as we see in most of the cymatic patterns from the video, it begs the question: Are not all primary apsects, components, of the Natural world symmetrical at their core?

Pythagoras had a fascination with symmetry. He saw it of frequencies, in music, and of course in his geometry. He did not have the requisite optical equipment like telescopes in is day, but he also speculated on the idea of the planets and the entire Cosmos possessing the beauty and simplicity of Symmetry. I believe he called this "The Music of the Spheres."

So we now see the adage "As above, so Below" actually has some scientific merit to it. Although this is by no means a scientific argument for String Theory, as I am probably speaking mostly of aesthetics here, I would like to think that this still maybe adds a grain of possibility to the whole String Theory argument.

Was that guy way ahead of his time??

https://spacezilotes.wordpress.com...

Off-topic, but maybe that's what morphogenic fields are composed of. Your vibrating strings.

Hmm...I kind of like that idea!! We should write Rupert an email and run it by him!
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
janesix
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7/14/2015 10:07:45 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 8:59:23 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 8:57:06 PM, janesix wrote:
At 7/14/2015 8:51:35 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 4:44:23 PM, janesix wrote:
https://www.youtube.com...

This one I find even more interesting. The sound vibrations create what resembles living, moving organisms.

Wow..that was a great video! Thanks.

And at 2:08 into it, those shapes especially reminded me of my previously-mentioned QM particle wave-forms. So, if a particular sound, in this case a high-frequency signal, can generate such symmetry as we see in most of the cymatic patterns from the video, it begs the question: Are not all primary apsects, components, of the Natural world symmetrical at their core?

Pythagoras had a fascination with symmetry. He saw it of frequencies, in music, and of course in his geometry. He did not have the requisite optical equipment like telescopes in is day, but he also speculated on the idea of the planets and the entire Cosmos possessing the beauty and simplicity of Symmetry. I believe he called this "The Music of the Spheres."

So we now see the adage "As above, so Below" actually has some scientific merit to it. Although this is by no means a scientific argument for String Theory, as I am probably speaking mostly of aesthetics here, I would like to think that this still maybe adds a grain of possibility to the whole String Theory argument.

Was that guy way ahead of his time??

https://spacezilotes.wordpress.com...

Off-topic, but maybe that's what morphogenic fields are composed of. Your vibrating strings.

Hmm...I kind of like that idea!! We should write Rupert an email and run it by him!

Go ahead and let me know if he responds. I'm not good at articulating ideas.
janesix
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7/14/2015 11:22:52 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
It seems to me that space has to be made of something physical, so it might as well be strings. Space can bend.

These strings are organised into fields. Energy is the strings vibrating. Particles are different fields interacting.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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7/14/2015 11:26:51 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 8:59:23 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 8:57:06 PM, janesix wrote:
At 7/14/2015 8:51:35 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 4:44:23 PM, janesix wrote:
https://www.youtube.com...

This one I find even more interesting. The sound vibrations create what resembles living, moving organisms.

Wow..that was a great video! Thanks.

And at 2:08 into it, those shapes especially reminded me of my previously-mentioned QM particle wave-forms. So, if a particular sound, in this case a high-frequency signal, can generate such symmetry as we see in most of the cymatic patterns from the video, it begs the question: Are not all primary apsects, components, of the Natural world symmetrical at their core?

Pythagoras had a fascination with symmetry. He saw it of frequencies, in music, and of course in his geometry. He did not have the requisite optical equipment like telescopes in is day, but he also speculated on the idea of the planets and the entire Cosmos possessing the beauty and simplicity of Symmetry. I believe he called this "The Music of the Spheres."

So we now see the adage "As above, so Below" actually has some scientific merit to it. Although this is by no means a scientific argument for String Theory, as I am probably speaking mostly of aesthetics here, I would like to think that this still maybe adds a grain of possibility to the whole String Theory argument.

Was that guy way ahead of his time??

https://spacezilotes.wordpress.com...

Off-topic, but maybe that's what morphogenic fields are composed of. Your vibrating strings.

Hmm...I kind of like that idea!! We should write Rupert an email and run it by him!

Lol you should. But you have to post his response if you get one.
Saint_of_Me
Posts: 2,402
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7/15/2015 1:08:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 10:07:45 PM, janesix wrote:
At 7/14/2015 8:59:23 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 8:57:06 PM, janesix wrote:
At 7/14/2015 8:51:35 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 7/14/2015 4:44:23 PM, janesix wrote:
https://www.youtube.com...

This one I find even more interesting. The sound vibrations create what resembles living, moving organisms.

Wow..that was a great video! Thanks.

And at 2:08 into it, those shapes especially reminded me of my previously-mentioned QM particle wave-forms. So, if a particular sound, in this case a high-frequency signal, can generate such symmetry as we see in most of the cymatic patterns from the video, it begs the question: Are not all primary apsects, components, of the Natural world symmetrical at their core?

Pythagoras had a fascination with symmetry. He saw it of frequencies, in music, and of course in his geometry. He did not have the requisite optical equipment like telescopes in is day, but he also speculated on the idea of the planets and the entire Cosmos possessing the beauty and simplicity of Symmetry. I believe he called this "The Music of the Spheres."

So we now see the adage "As above, so Below" actually has some scientific merit to it. Although this is by no means a scientific argument for String Theory, as I am probably speaking mostly of aesthetics here, I would like to think that this still maybe adds a grain of possibility to the whole String Theory argument.

Was that guy way ahead of his time??

https://spacezilotes.wordpress.com...

Off-topic, but maybe that's what morphogenic fields are composed of. Your vibrating strings.

Hmm...I kind of like that idea!! We should write Rupert an email and run it by him!

Go ahead and let me know if he responds. I'm not good at articulating ideas.

Ya know, I was half-kidding when I first proposed that idea of writing Sheldrake. But I think I am actually going to do it. I will let you know. First I must acquire his email addy, which should not be too difficult. Last I heard he was a Fellow at a Noetic Institute in California, USA.
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.