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New Discovery on Cell Structure

slo1
Posts: 4,353
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7/14/2015 10:19:59 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
http://www.sciencedaily.com...

Dr Royle said: "We had been looking in 2D and this gave the impression that 'bridges' linked microtubules together. This had been known since the 1970s. All of a sudden, tilting the fibre in 3D showed us that the bridges were not single struts at all but a web-like structure linking all the microtubules together."

The discovery impacts on the research into cancerous cells. A cell needs to share chromosomes accurately when it divides otherwise the two new cells can end up with the wrong number of chromosomes. This is called aneuploidy and this has been linked to a range of tumours in different body organs.

The mitotic spindle is responsible for sharing the chromosomes and the researchers at the University believe that the mesh is needed to give structural support. Too little support from the mesh and the spindle will be too weak to work properly, however too much support will result in it being unable to correct mistakes. It was found that one of the proteins that make up the mesh, TACC3, is over-produced in certain cancers. When this situation was mimicked in the lab, the mesh and microtubules were altered and cells had trouble sharing chromosomes during division.
slo1
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7/14/2015 10:29:46 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Very interesting find that impacts the cells ability to properly divide.

It is hard to imagine how this new knowledge could help treat cancers caused by this when TACC3 is naturally part of the "mesh" and it needs to be not too much or not too little to help support accurate cell division.

Maybe could use TACC3 expression as early detection?
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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7/14/2015 10:34:25 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 10:29:46 AM, slo1 wrote:
Very interesting find that impacts the cells ability to properly divide.

It is hard to imagine how this new knowledge could help treat cancers caused by this when TACC3 is naturally part of the "mesh" and it needs to be not too much or not too little to help support accurate cell division.

Maybe could use TACC3 expression as early detection?

Interesting result. Goes to show how developments in imaging technology can lead to such seemingly simple findings.

It sounds like the idea is to use it to prevent the spread of cancer. I guess what you're saying is that presence (amount? volume?) TACC3 outside of a certain range might be a discriminative feature for detecting early cancer? I don't know enough about it to say, but do you know anything about the statistics of TACC3 presence with and without cancer?
slo1
Posts: 4,353
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7/14/2015 10:44:16 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 10:34:25 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/14/2015 10:29:46 AM, slo1 wrote:
Very interesting find that impacts the cells ability to properly divide.

It is hard to imagine how this new knowledge could help treat cancers caused by this when TACC3 is naturally part of the "mesh" and it needs to be not too much or not too little to help support accurate cell division.

Maybe could use TACC3 expression as early detection?

Interesting result. Goes to show how developments in imaging technology can lead to such seemingly simple findings.

It sounds like the idea is to use it to prevent the spread of cancer. I guess what you're saying is that presence (amount? volume?) TACC3 outside of a certain range might be a discriminative feature for detecting early cancer? I don't know enough about it to say, but do you know anything about the statistics of TACC3 presence with and without cancer?

I know nothing about it. My first question as an amateur is whether the expression of TACC3 in the body would be consistent through out the body or localized to where a tumor is growing. This doc seems to suggest that it is higher in certain organs.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

If I had to go through growing up again, I think I would go into medical research. Love this type of stuff.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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7/14/2015 10:50:05 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/14/2015 10:44:16 AM, slo1 wrote:
At 7/14/2015 10:34:25 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 7/14/2015 10:29:46 AM, slo1 wrote:
Very interesting find that impacts the cells ability to properly divide.

It is hard to imagine how this new knowledge could help treat cancers caused by this when TACC3 is naturally part of the "mesh" and it needs to be not too much or not too little to help support accurate cell division.

Maybe could use TACC3 expression as early detection?

Interesting result. Goes to show how developments in imaging technology can lead to such seemingly simple findings.

It sounds like the idea is to use it to prevent the spread of cancer. I guess what you're saying is that presence (amount? volume?) TACC3 outside of a certain range might be a discriminative feature for detecting early cancer? I don't know enough about it to say, but do you know anything about the statistics of TACC3 presence with and without cancer?

I know nothing about it. My first question as an amateur is whether the expression of TACC3 in the body would be consistent through out the body or localized to where a tumor is growing. This doc seems to suggest that it is higher in certain organs.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

Good question. Though, even if it varied wildly by organ, it could still be useful as a discriminative feature of certain types of cancer if its statistics varied with presence of cancer. I don't know either. The only research I've done in genetics is mathematical modelling - I don't really know much at all about the biochemistry.

If I had to go through growing up again, I think I would go into medical research. Love this type of stuff.

Haha, that's cool. Are you sure it's too late to get into it? I know people who did / are doing their PhDs in their 50's.

If I had to grow up again, I think I'd still be doing the exact same research I'm doing now.