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epigenetics?

janesix
Posts: 3,438
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8/12/2015 6:21:56 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Dna from carp was transferred to the egg of goldfish, and a carp/goldfish hybrid was formed. Where did the characteristics of goldfish come from, since the only dna came from the carp?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...
Burzmali
Posts: 1,310
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8/12/2015 6:33:05 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
You should probably read the whole paper: http://www.biolreprod.org...

During embryonic development, the somites were "consistent" with normal goldfish development. After that, though, the surviving cloned fish (only 7 of the original 501) just looked like carp:

"When these cloned fish were put into the same tank with red common carp and goldfish, it was difficult to find any difference between the cloned fish and the red common carp that provided nuclei. The exterior phenotypic characteristics of red common carp, such as two pairs of barbells, long body shape, normal tail, and normal eyes were present in the cloned fish, but there was almost no visible contribution of distinctive goldfish characteristics, such as spherical body shape, triangle tail, and dragon eyes (Fig. 1G)."

This experiment helps show the role that the existing structure of the egg plays in development in goldfish. I don't think epigenetics is relevant.
janesix
Posts: 3,438
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8/12/2015 6:38:54 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/12/2015 6:33:05 PM, Burzmali wrote:
You should probably read the whole paper: http://www.biolreprod.org...

During embryonic development, the somites were "consistent" with normal goldfish development. After that, though, the surviving cloned fish (only 7 of the original 501) just looked like carp:

"When these cloned fish were put into the same tank with red common carp and goldfish, it was difficult to find any difference between the cloned fish and the red common carp that provided nuclei. The exterior phenotypic characteristics of red common carp, such as two pairs of barbells, long body shape, normal tail, and normal eyes were present in the cloned fish, but there was almost no visible contribution of distinctive goldfish characteristics, such as spherical body shape, triangle tail, and dragon eyes (Fig. 1G)."

This experiment helps show the role that the existing structure of the egg plays in development in goldfish. I don't think epigenetics is relevant.

Thanks. I couldn't find the whole paper,only the abstract.
medv4380
Posts: 200
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8/12/2015 7:01:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/12/2015 6:33:05 PM, Burzmali wrote:
This experiment helps show the role that the existing structure of the egg plays in development in goldfish. I don't think epigenetics is relevant.

Wiki Definition:
Epigenetics is the study, in the field of genetics, of cellular and physiological phenotypic trait variations that are caused by external or environmental factors that switch genes on and off and affect how cells read genes instead of being caused by changes in the DNA sequence.

If the structure of the egg plays a roll in the development then it is related to epigenetics.
Burzmali
Posts: 1,310
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8/12/2015 8:53:37 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/12/2015 7:01:02 PM, medv4380 wrote:
At 8/12/2015 6:33:05 PM, Burzmali wrote:
This experiment helps show the role that the existing structure of the egg plays in development in goldfish. I don't think epigenetics is relevant.

Wiki Definition:
Epigenetics is the study, in the field of genetics, of cellular and physiological phenotypic trait variations that are caused by external or environmental factors that switch genes on and off and affect how cells read genes instead of being caused by changes in the DNA sequence.

If the structure of the egg plays a roll in the development then it is related to epigenetics.

That's only if gene switching a factor in the change in somite appearance. The change could be due to something else, though, such as a characteristic of the cytoplasm of the egg that affects protein folding. Or it could be some kind of deficiency that prevents an enzyme from functioning. Regardless, I admit that I hadn't considered that something in the egg could be affecting gene expression, so epigenetics could be involved.
Iredia
Posts: 1,608
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8/12/2015 10:56:40 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/12/2015 6:38:54 PM, janesix wrote:
At 8/12/2015 6:33:05 PM, Burzmali wrote:
You should probably read the whole paper: http://www.biolreprod.org...

During embryonic development, the somites were "consistent" with normal goldfish development. After that, though, the surviving cloned fish (only 7 of the original 501) just looked like carp:

"When these cloned fish were put into the same tank with red common carp and goldfish, it was difficult to find any difference between the cloned fish and the red common carp that provided nuclei. The exterior phenotypic characteristics of red common carp, such as two pairs of barbells, long body shape, normal tail, and normal eyes were present in the cloned fish, but there was almost no visible contribution of distinctive goldfish characteristics, such as spherical body shape, triangle tail, and dragon eyes (Fig. 1G)."

This experiment helps show the role that the existing structure of the egg plays in development in goldfish. I don't think epigenetics is relevant.

Thanks. I couldn't find the whole paper,only the abstract.

Just click the link below the abstract and you're good to go.
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