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dylancatlow
Posts: 12,253
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8/15/2015 2:59:02 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
If an asteroid, say, the size of Mount Everest, were to strike the earth, would the force of the impact cause everything on the opposite side of earth to be flung into the air? If so, how long would it take after impact, and how forceful would it be?
dee-em
Posts: 6,486
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8/15/2015 3:38:26 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/15/2015 2:59:02 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
If an asteroid, say, the size of Mount Everest, were to strike the earth, would the force of the impact cause everything on the opposite side of earth to be flung into the air? If so, how long would it take after impact, and how forceful would it be?

It's not just a question of size but more of speed and trajectory which determines the energy of impact. To answer your question, I doubt it very much. Remember that the Earth's core is molten. The force of the collision would be absorbed by the Earth's crust and transmitted outwards as a shock wave in a circle (assuming a vertical impact). I'm not a physicist, but that's my take on it.

In fact, thinking about it, the opposite may happen. Anyone on the other side of the Earth might feel a (very, very) slight tug of gravity as the Earth was nudged slightly in that direction by the impact. Think of it as a giant rocket motor igniting beneath your feet. The acceleration pushes you in your seat downwards or backwards towards the rocket engine.
Yassine
Posts: 2,617
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8/15/2015 4:21:34 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/15/2015 2:59:02 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
If an asteroid, say, the size of Mount Everest, were to strike the earth, would the force of the impact cause everything on the opposite side of earth to be flung into the air? If so, how long would it take after impact, and how forceful would it be?

- That would depend on a number of factors, density, composition, velocity, angle, trajectory, momentum... of the asteroid, & where it landed, sea, land...

- Obviously the region affected the most would be the surface of the impact, & then the surrounding area by a few thousands kms. Given that the shock is mechanical, its wave is sonic & thus would take a few hours to hit the other side of the planet. There would also be some gigantic & super-sonic wind currents & tsunamis involved, though they would reach much later, maybe after a day or so. The intensity of the impact would most likely create a mega-quake (over 10 magnitude on Richter scale), causing the very ground to change & volcanos to erupt spontaneously. If things flung into the air, it wouldn't be because of the quakes, but because of the very fast wind currents & gaps in atmospheric pressure, although that would be unlikely to happen. The impact might very likely cause an increase of atmospheric pressure in areas far from its site, which would make it hard for things to evaporate or fly.

- As far as the Earth itself is concerned, the impact of an asteroid of the size of Mount Everest might be noticeable but it would be extremely insignificant. The largest crater on the Earth's surface is probably not even 200 km wide, & at most few kms deep. That's nothing!
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Evidence
Posts: 853
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8/15/2015 6:03:53 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/15/2015 2:59:02 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
If an asteroid, say, the size of Mount Everest, were to strike the earth, would the force of the impact cause everything on the opposite side of earth to be flung into the air? If so, how long would it take after impact, and how forceful would it be? :

I just seen this video, it shows and explains the creation, .. sorry, the evolution of our moon, with earth being struck by another planet. First I thought it was a children's Disney movie like "Dinosaur", but then I noticed they were serious, so is the title.

https://www.youtube.com...
There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil
to one who is striking at the root. - Henry David Thoreau
Yassine
Posts: 2,617
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8/15/2015 6:18:16 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/15/2015 6:03:53 AM, Evidence wrote:
At 8/15/2015 2:59:02 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
If an asteroid, say, the size of Mount Everest, were to strike the earth, would the force of the impact cause everything on the opposite side of earth to be flung into the air? If so, how long would it take after impact, and how forceful would it be? :

I just seen this video, it shows and explains the creation, .. sorry, the evolution of our moon, with earth being struck by another planet. First I thought it was a children's Disney movie like "Dinosaur", but then I noticed they were serious, so is the title.

https://www.youtube.com...

- I generally avoid documentaries, they are full of bullsh*t passed as serious science, it hurts. The best, though imperfect, way to learn something, is through academics.
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kp98
Posts: 729
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8/15/2015 7:18:47 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I generally avoid documentaries, they are full of bullsh*t passed as serious science, it hurts. The best, though imperfect, way to learn something, is through academics.

I take it you learned how to use commas, from a documentary. Anyway, I disagree. Good documentaries are often excellent introductions to difficult subjects. Perhaps I was spoilt by growing in England and the BBC! No doubt there are bad documentaries, but there are also bad 'academics'.
Yassine
Posts: 2,617
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8/15/2015 1:59:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/15/2015 7:18:47 AM, kp98 wrote:
I generally avoid documentaries, they are full of bullsh*t passed as serious science, it hurts. The best, though imperfect, way to learn something, is through academics.

I take it you learned how to use commas, from a documentary.

- I use commas the way I learned it in French. The French handle punctuations differently than the English, which I am progressively attempting to to adopt.

Anyway, I disagree. Good documentaries are often excellent introductions to difficult subjects.

- Doesn't change the fact that they slip some inaccuracies within. As you said, there are some good documentaries. But, most the ones I came across are tainted with bullsh*t. I am not speculating, I speak from experience, & Fundamental Physics is my field. The only reliable types of documentaries, granted they are good, are those that relate to very specific & very well understood topics.

Perhaps I was spoilt by growing in England and the BBC! No doubt there are bad documentaries, but there are also bad 'academics'.

- That goes for the BBC as well. & sure, there are bad 'academics' as well, they are just much less frequent.
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ecco
Posts: 180
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8/15/2015 4:05:03 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/15/2015 4:21:34 AM, Yassine wrote:
At 8/15/2015 2:59:02 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
If an asteroid, say, the size of Mount Everest, were to strike the earth, would the force of the impact cause everything on the opposite side of earth to be flung into the air? If so, how long would it take after impact, and how forceful would it be?


- As far as the Earth itself is concerned, the impact of an asteroid of the size of Mount Everest might be noticeable but it would be extremely insignificant. The largest crater on the Earth's surface is probably not even 200 km wide, & at most few kms deep. That's nothing!

Unless you are a dinosaur. The dino killer is estimated to have been around
10 K across.

http://www.pbs.org...
Hypothesis: Asteroid Impact

Did a collision with a giant asteroid or comet change the shape of life on Earth forever?

It is widely agreed that such an object -- 10 kilometers across -- struck just off the coast of the Yucatan peninsula 65 million years ago.

According to scientists who maintain that dinosaur extinction came quickly, the impact must have spelled the cataclysmic end.

For months, scientists conclude, dense clouds of dust blocked the sun's rays, darkening and chilling Earth to deadly levels for most plants and, in turn, many animals. Then, when the dust finally settled, greenhouse gases created by the impact caused temperatures to skyrocket above pre-impact levels.

In just a few years, according to this hypothesis, these frigid and sweltering climatic extremes caused the extinction of not just the dinosaurs, but of up to 70 percent of all plants and animals living at the time.
Think
August_Burns_Red
Posts: 1,253
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8/15/2015 9:39:54 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/15/2015 2:59:02 AM, dylancatlow wrote:
If an asteroid, say, the size of Mount Everest, were to strike the earth, would the force of the impact cause everything on the opposite side of earth to be flung into the air? If so, how long would it take after impact, and how forceful would it be?

we'd need the mass and speed (velocity) of the asteroid in order to do the math for how far into the Earth it would penetrate. oh, also the density of the asteroid. loose rock and ice wouldnt penetrate as deep as solid and denser rock, right? even if I had those measurments thought the math is way beyond me. but I DO know that the asteroid that wiped the Dinos 65 mya was only about 6 miles in diamater! so your asteroid would destroy ALL of us and all living things for sure. it wouldnt be pretty, and maybe thousands of years before life could begin to sprout agiain. God Bless.
Tomorrow's forecast: God reigns and the Son shines!
August_Burns_Red
Posts: 1,253
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8/15/2015 9:41:26 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/15/2015 7:18:47 AM, kp98 wrote:
I generally avoid documentaries, they are full of bullsh*t passed as serious science, it hurts. The best, though imperfect, way to learn something, is through academics.

I take it you learned how to use commas, from a documentary. Anyway, I disagree. Good documentaries are often excellent introductions to difficult subjects. Perhaps I was spoilt by growing in England and the BBC! No doubt there are bad documentaries, but there are also bad 'academics'.

naw, the best way to learn is from experience. and how can you say docs are shite but academics rule when alot of doc makers are academics? LOL. but I think learning from experts is 2nd to experience when learning something. God Bless.
Tomorrow's forecast: God reigns and the Son shines!