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Quark Gluon Plasma Discovery

slo1
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9/5/2015 12:34:04 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Interesting discovery

1. Previously though that in order to create a Quark Gluon Plasma, would need to have a symetrical collision, meaning of two of the particles of the same thing.

2. An experiment created Quark Gluon Plasma colliding a proton with lead, an asymmetrical collision.

3. Just though that can have a state of quarks and gluons in a super heated state where they are not interacting is rather amazing. Gluons hold quarks together to form protons and neutrons. If you try to separate some quarks held together by a gluon, the further apart the quarks the greater the force. It is like the opposite of gravity. It is even more amazing in that once you get so far part two new quarks poof into existence to be in pair with the two original quarks in a lower energy state.

4. The ability to study this type of matter is important as one of the greatest mysteries of Big Bang Theory is the breaking of symmetry. While this is may not be related to the quark gluon epoc in the big bang, this symmetry is easy to visualize. We all know that when matter and anti matter meet they annihilate and create 100% energy. The big bang should have created just as much matter and anti matter, in which most matter would have thus been annihilated. We don't see near as much anti matter as matter in the universe, thus that is breaking symmetry. There are very much other symmetries that were broken and some of those may have been broken during this milisecond quark gluon plasma phase, the theorized second phase of the big bang.

Here is the article for those interested.
http://www.sciencedaily.com...
slo1
Posts: 4,314
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9/5/2015 12:37:05 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Actally, I just read this article and it is suspected that the antimatter/matter symmetry breaking happened at the quark gluon phase.

http://www.sciencedaily.com...