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Antineutrinos on Earth

tejretics
Posts: 6,089
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9/22/2015 5:51:28 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Antineutrinos are antiparticles of neutrinos. Neutrinos have a minute (almost negligible) mass of 0.320 " 0.081 eV/c^2, so the antiparticles (I think) have the same mass. Particle physicist Shaun Usman of the National Geospatial Agency in Springfield, Virginia published the first global map of antineutrinos. The study is linked here [http://www.nature.com...].

Each second, more than 10 septillion (10^25) antineutrinos race away from Earth and into space. That's 100 trillion times as many antineutrinos as stars in the galaxy. But who's counting?

Leave that to particle physicist Shawn Usman of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Springfield, Va. In September in Scientific Reports, he and colleagues published the first global map of antineutrinos, harmless subatomic particles (and the antimatter cousins of neutrinos) born when radioactive elements break down. That decay happens within the planet's crust and mantle and in nuclear reactors.

Usman's team pieced together data, including measurements from detectors in Italy and Japan, to build a Technicolor map of antineutrino abundance. Dark reds flag hot spots; blues mark areas where antineutrinos are less bountiful.

The map could help scientists nail down the driver of Earth's internal heating system, which fuels plate tectonics and volcanoes. Just how much heat comes from radioactive energy in the planet is still up for debate, Usman says. His team's map might offer researchers a clearer picture. And it will certainly be more colorful.


https://www.sciencenews.org...

So there are, obviously, some distinctive places where more antineutrinos are found. Specifically, near nuclear reactors, mountain peaks, and ocean doldrums.

I found this interesting. Thoughts?
"Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe." - Frederick Douglass
Mhykiel
Posts: 5,987
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9/23/2015 1:48:12 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/22/2015 5:51:28 PM, tejretics wrote:
Antineutrinos are antiparticles of neutrinos. Neutrinos have a minute (almost negligible) mass of 0.320 " 0.081 eV/c^2, so the antiparticles (I think) have the same mass. Particle physicist Shaun Usman of the National Geospatial Agency in Springfield, Virginia published the first global map of antineutrinos. The study is linked here [http://www.nature.com...].

Each second, more than 10 septillion (10^25) antineutrinos race away from Earth and into space. That's 100 trillion times as many antineutrinos as stars in the galaxy. But who's counting?

Leave that to particle physicist Shawn Usman of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Springfield, Va. In September in Scientific Reports, he and colleagues published the first global map of antineutrinos, harmless subatomic particles (and the antimatter cousins of neutrinos) born when radioactive elements break down. That decay happens within the planet's crust and mantle and in nuclear reactors.

Usman's team pieced together data, including measurements from detectors in Italy and Japan, to build a Technicolor map of antineutrino abundance. Dark reds flag hot spots; blues mark areas where antineutrinos are less bountiful.

The map could help scientists nail down the driver of Earth's internal heating system, which fuels plate tectonics and volcanoes. Just how much heat comes from radioactive energy in the planet is still up for debate, Usman says. His team's map might offer researchers a clearer picture. And it will certainly be more colorful.


https://www.sciencenews.org...

So there are, obviously, some distinctive places where more antineutrinos are found. Specifically, near nuclear reactors, mountain peaks, and ocean doldrums.

I found this interesting. Thoughts?

Ocean Doldrums emit negligible antinuetrinos
tejretics
Posts: 6,089
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9/23/2015 4:29:50 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/23/2015 1:48:12 AM, Mhykiel wrote:
At 9/22/2015 5:51:28 PM, tejretics wrote:
Antineutrinos are antiparticles of neutrinos. Neutrinos have a minute (almost negligible) mass of 0.320 " 0.081 eV/c^2, so the antiparticles (I think) have the same mass. Particle physicist Shaun Usman of the National Geospatial Agency in Springfield, Virginia published the first global map of antineutrinos. The study is linked here [http://www.nature.com...].

Each second, more than 10 septillion (10^25) antineutrinos race away from Earth and into space. That's 100 trillion times as many antineutrinos as stars in the galaxy. But who's counting?

Leave that to particle physicist Shawn Usman of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Springfield, Va. In September in Scientific Reports, he and colleagues published the first global map of antineutrinos, harmless subatomic particles (and the antimatter cousins of neutrinos) born when radioactive elements break down. That decay happens within the planet's crust and mantle and in nuclear reactors.

Usman's team pieced together data, including measurements from detectors in Italy and Japan, to build a Technicolor map of antineutrino abundance. Dark reds flag hot spots; blues mark areas where antineutrinos are less bountiful.

The map could help scientists nail down the driver of Earth's internal heating system, which fuels plate tectonics and volcanoes. Just how much heat comes from radioactive energy in the planet is still up for debate, Usman says. His team's map might offer researchers a clearer picture. And it will certainly be more colorful.


https://www.sciencenews.org...

So there are, obviously, some distinctive places where more antineutrinos are found. Specifically, near nuclear reactors, mountain peaks, and ocean doldrums.

I found this interesting. Thoughts?

Ocean Doldrums emit negligible antinuetrinos

My error. Ocean doldrums emit *less,* not more.
"Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe." - Frederick Douglass
slo1
Posts: 4,353
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9/23/2015 2:38:36 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/22/2015 5:51:28 PM, tejretics wrote:
Antineutrinos are antiparticles of neutrinos. Neutrinos have a minute (almost negligible) mass of 0.320 " 0.081 eV/c^2, so the antiparticles (I think) have the same mass. Particle physicist Shaun Usman of the National Geospatial Agency in Springfield, Virginia published the first global map of antineutrinos. The study is linked here [http://www.nature.com...].

Each second, more than 10 septillion (10^25) antineutrinos race away from Earth and into space. That's 100 trillion times as many antineutrinos as stars in the galaxy. But who's counting?

Leave that to particle physicist Shawn Usman of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Springfield, Va. In September in Scientific Reports, he and colleagues published the first global map of antineutrinos, harmless subatomic particles (and the antimatter cousins of neutrinos) born when radioactive elements break down. That decay happens within the planet's crust and mantle and in nuclear reactors.

Usman's team pieced together data, including measurements from detectors in Italy and Japan, to build a Technicolor map of antineutrino abundance. Dark reds flag hot spots; blues mark areas where antineutrinos are less bountiful.

The map could help scientists nail down the driver of Earth's internal heating system, which fuels plate tectonics and volcanoes. Just how much heat comes from radioactive energy in the planet is still up for debate, Usman says. His team's map might offer researchers a clearer picture. And it will certainly be more colorful.


https://www.sciencenews.org...

So there are, obviously, some distinctive places where more antineutrinos are found. Specifically, near nuclear reactors, mountain peaks, and ocean doldrums.

I found this interesting. Thoughts?

Pretty amazing. Here is the paper in Nature:
http://www.nature.com...

Here is the open source maps:
http://www.ultralytics.com...

I find it very interesting that it can be used to identify any undeclared nuclear reactors, but even more interesting is whether anti neutrino detection can get to a level where it could be used to track a nations compliance to the nuclear non-proliferation treaty for something like uranium enrichment.
Mhykiel
Posts: 5,987
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9/24/2015 1:16:29 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/23/2015 2:38:36 PM, slo1 wrote:
At 9/22/2015 5:51:28 PM, tejretics wrote:
Antineutrinos are antiparticles of neutrinos. Neutrinos have a minute (almost negligible) mass of 0.320 " 0.081 eV/c^2, so the antiparticles (I think) have the same mass. Particle physicist Shaun Usman of the National Geospatial Agency in Springfield, Virginia published the first global map of antineutrinos. The study is linked here [http://www.nature.com...].

Each second, more than 10 septillion (10^25) antineutrinos race away from Earth and into space. That's 100 trillion times as many antineutrinos as stars in the galaxy. But who's counting?

Leave that to particle physicist Shawn Usman of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Springfield, Va. In September in Scientific Reports, he and colleagues published the first global map of antineutrinos, harmless subatomic particles (and the antimatter cousins of neutrinos) born when radioactive elements break down. That decay happens within the planet's crust and mantle and in nuclear reactors.

Usman's team pieced together data, including measurements from detectors in Italy and Japan, to build a Technicolor map of antineutrino abundance. Dark reds flag hot spots; blues mark areas where antineutrinos are less bountiful.

The map could help scientists nail down the driver of Earth's internal heating system, which fuels plate tectonics and volcanoes. Just how much heat comes from radioactive energy in the planet is still up for debate, Usman says. His team's map might offer researchers a clearer picture. And it will certainly be more colorful.


https://www.sciencenews.org...

So there are, obviously, some distinctive places where more antineutrinos are found. Specifically, near nuclear reactors, mountain peaks, and ocean doldrums.

I found this interesting. Thoughts?

Pretty amazing. Here is the paper in Nature:
http://www.nature.com...

Here is the open source maps:
http://www.ultralytics.com...

I find it very interesting that it can be used to identify any undeclared nuclear reactors, but even more interesting is whether anti neutrino detection can get to a level where it could be used to track a nations compliance to the nuclear non-proliferation treaty for something like uranium enrichment.

The neutrino detectors were at ground level. Much of the map is a best guess from an earlier model of the Earth's crust and density of radioactive elements.

Checking up on other countries would still require being allowed in to conduct surveys.
chui
Posts: 507
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9/25/2015 9:13:15 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/24/2015 1:16:29 AM, Mhykiel wrote:
At 9/23/2015 2:38:36 PM, slo1 wrote:
At 9/22/2015 5:51:28 PM, tejretics wrote:
Antineutrinos are antiparticles of neutrinos. Neutrinos have a minute (almost negligible) mass of 0.320 " 0.081 eV/c^2, so the antiparticles (I think) have the same mass. Particle physicist Shaun Usman of the National Geospatial Agency in Springfield, Virginia published the first global map of antineutrinos. The study is linked here [http://www.nature.com...].

Each second, more than 10 septillion (10^25) antineutrinos race away from Earth and into space. That's 100 trillion times as many antineutrinos as stars in the galaxy. But who's counting?

Leave that to particle physicist Shawn Usman of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Springfield, Va. In September in Scientific Reports, he and colleagues published the first global map of antineutrinos, harmless subatomic particles (and the antimatter cousins of neutrinos) born when radioactive elements break down. That decay happens within the planet's crust and mantle and in nuclear reactors.

Usman's team pieced together data, including measurements from detectors in Italy and Japan, to build a Technicolor map of antineutrino abundance. Dark reds flag hot spots; blues mark areas where antineutrinos are less bountiful.

The map could help scientists nail down the driver of Earth's internal heating system, which fuels plate tectonics and volcanoes. Just how much heat comes from radioactive energy in the planet is still up for debate, Usman says. His team's map might offer researchers a clearer picture. And it will certainly be more colorful.


https://www.sciencenews.org...

So there are, obviously, some distinctive places where more antineutrinos are found. Specifically, near nuclear reactors, mountain peaks, and ocean doldrums.

I found this interesting. Thoughts?

Pretty amazing. Here is the paper in Nature:
http://www.nature.com...

Here is the open source maps:
http://www.ultralytics.com...

I find it very interesting that it can be used to identify any undeclared nuclear reactors, but even more interesting is whether anti neutrino detection can get to a level where it could be used to track a nations compliance to the nuclear non-proliferation treaty for something like uranium enrichment.

The neutrino detectors were at ground level. Much of the map is a best guess from an earlier model of the Earth's crust and density of radioactive elements.

Checking up on other countries would still require being allowed in to conduct surveys.

The highly penetrative nature of neutrino radiations allows detection from long distance. For example the gran sasso detector in Italy detects neutrinos made in Geneva. So it may be possible to monitor from outside a country's borders