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Renewable replacement for metal?

Mr_Anderson
Posts: 116
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11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.
Sosoconfused
Posts: 237
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11/13/2015 6:29:01 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM, Mr_Anderson wrote:
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.

I think it would depend heavily on the application. In the mountain bike world we have moved to mostly carbon composite components/frames for the added strength, weight savings, etc... plastics have also come a long way. However, I don't think you're going to be able to build an engine block out of anything less than Al or Fe for some time. The same goes for electrical wires, Cu is still king. You'd have to mimic a lot of very special properties in order to find a true, universal replacement. Since different metals have different conductive, structural, etc.... properties, you'd have to figure out a replacement for each metal, each alloy, etc.... so replacements would have to be application specific.
WinTheDebate
Posts: 1
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11/15/2015 3:39:57 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
There might be many substitutes for metal, but many have not either : 1) Discovered 2) Been able to be artificially produced in mass production 3) Being mined in mass production
#prayforparis
johnlubba
Posts: 2,892
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11/15/2015 6:57:57 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM, Mr_Anderson wrote:
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.

At the moment the current value of metal per ton in the UK is "20 per ton, as opposed to "120 a year ago, this is because Australia is able to mass produce a cheap quality replacement, What that replacement is exactly I cannot tell you but I know it's enough to cause the scrap industry in Britain to come to a halt.
dee-em
Posts: 6,466
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11/15/2015 12:38:13 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 11/15/2015 6:57:57 AM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM, Mr_Anderson wrote:
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.


At the moment the current value of metal per ton in the UK is "20 per ton, as opposed to "120 a year ago, this is because Australia is able to mass produce a cheap quality replacement, What that replacement is exactly I cannot tell you but I know it's enough to cause the scrap industry in Britain to come to a halt.

What? Which metal?

The iron ore price has dived but that is not because of some cheaper alternative. It is because the demand from China has fallen dramatically (they had been stock-piling steel for years anyway) and Australia has been opening new very large mines for an anticipated market that is no longer there. Overproduction with reduced demand has led to the fall in the price. Some iron ore mines are barely viable now. The same thing is occurring with coal mines.
johnlubba
Posts: 2,892
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11/15/2015 1:13:41 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 11/15/2015 12:38:13 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 11/15/2015 6:57:57 AM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM, Mr_Anderson wrote:
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.


At the moment the current value of metal per ton in the UK is "20 per ton, as opposed to "120 a year ago, this is because Australia is able to mass produce a cheap quality replacement, What that replacement is exactly I cannot tell you but I know it's enough to cause the scrap industry in Britain to come to a halt.

What? Which metal?

The iron ore price has dived but that is not because of some cheaper alternative. It is because the demand from China has fallen dramatically (they had been stock-piling steel for years anyway) and Australia has been opening new very large mines for an anticipated market that is no longer there. Overproduction with reduced demand has led to the fall in the price. Some iron ore mines are barely viable now. The same thing is occurring with coal mines.

Tell it to someone who cares.
dee-em
Posts: 6,466
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11/15/2015 1:23:19 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 11/15/2015 1:13:41 PM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/15/2015 12:38:13 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 11/15/2015 6:57:57 AM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM, Mr_Anderson wrote:
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.


At the moment the current value of metal per ton in the UK is "20 per ton, as opposed to "120 a year ago, this is because Australia is able to mass produce a cheap quality replacement, What that replacement is exactly I cannot tell you but I know it's enough to cause the scrap industry in Britain to come to a halt.

What? Which metal?

The iron ore price has dived but that is not because of some cheaper alternative. It is because the demand from China has fallen dramatically (they had been stock-piling steel for years anyway) and Australia has been opening new very large mines for an anticipated market that is no longer there. Overproduction with reduced demand has led to the fall in the price. Some iron ore mines are barely viable now. The same thing is occurring with coal mines.

Tell it to someone who cares.

That's fine. There are others here who do care about a fact-based exchange of ideas. I understand if you don't count yourself as one of them. One would have to wonder why you bother posting then?
johnlubba
Posts: 2,892
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11/15/2015 2:46:58 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 11/15/2015 1:23:19 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 11/15/2015 1:13:41 PM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/15/2015 12:38:13 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 11/15/2015 6:57:57 AM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM, Mr_Anderson wrote:
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.


At the moment the current value of metal per ton in the UK is "20 per ton, as opposed to "120 a year ago, this is because Australia is able to mass produce a cheap quality replacement, What that replacement is exactly I cannot tell you but I know it's enough to cause the scrap industry in Britain to come to a halt.

What? Which metal?

The iron ore price has dived but that is not because of some cheaper alternative. It is because the demand from China has fallen dramatically (they had been stock-piling steel for years anyway) and Australia has been opening new very large mines for an anticipated market that is no longer there. Overproduction with reduced demand has led to the fall in the price. Some iron ore mines are barely viable now. The same thing is occurring with coal mines.

Tell it to someone who cares.

That's fine. There are others here who do care about a fact-based exchange of ideas. I understand if you don't count yourself as one of them. One would have to wonder why you bother posting then?

To interact with people who are not as conceited as yourself.
dee-em
Posts: 6,466
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11/15/2015 9:35:06 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 11/15/2015 2:46:58 PM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/15/2015 1:23:19 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 11/15/2015 1:13:41 PM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/15/2015 12:38:13 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 11/15/2015 6:57:57 AM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM, Mr_Anderson wrote:
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.


At the moment the current value of metal per ton in the UK is "20 per ton, as opposed to "120 a year ago, this is because Australia is able to mass produce a cheap quality replacement, What that replacement is exactly I cannot tell you but I know it's enough to cause the scrap industry in Britain to come to a halt.

What? Which metal?

The iron ore price has dived but that is not because of some cheaper alternative. It is because the demand from China has fallen dramatically (they had been stock-piling steel for years anyway) and Australia has been opening new very large mines for an anticipated market that is no longer there. Overproduction with reduced demand has led to the fall in the price. Some iron ore mines are barely viable now. The same thing is occurring with coal mines.

Tell it to someone who cares.

That's fine. There are others here who do care about a fact-based exchange of ideas. I understand if you don't count yourself as one of them. One would have to wonder why you bother posting then?

To interact with people who are not as conceited as yourself.

I correct you on some misinformation you put forward and that makes me conceited?
Whatever.
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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11/17/2015 4:09:27 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM, Mr_Anderson wrote:
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.

It all depends on the use. Ceramics have replaced gold and silver for most uses in dentistry. There are also ceramic gun barrels. Shiny plastic replaces metal for some decorative uses. Carbon fiber has replaced metal for certain structural uses, like bicycle frames and car structures in some applications. Steel cables can sometimes be replaced with plastics, like kevlar. That leads to metal armor being replaced with kevlar fabric. Carbon fiber filaments are stronger than steel wire, and would have many uses if they could be manufactured cheaply in long lengths. Types of heat resistant glass replace metal for use in cooking vessels. Epoxy sometimes replaces metal solder and rivets.

Nearly 100% of lead and iron are recycled, because it makes economic sense to do so rather than find replacements. The quantities of metals in the earth's crust are astoundingly large, so the question is the cost of recovering and refining them rather than there being any danger of running out. The book "The Breakfast Fallacy" deals at length with the cost tradeoffs in replacement, recycling, and new extraction of metals. We won't run out of anything, but replacement is sometimes cheaper.
Skynet
Posts: 674
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11/19/2015 1:42:56 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Metals are elemental so are durable and cannot be truely replaced.
One perk to being a dad is you get to watch cartoons again without explaining yourself.
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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11/19/2015 3:05:53 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM, Mr_Anderson wrote:
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.

I keep flipflopping on the question. My first reaction is, why? There is very little concern over availability of most metals - recycling of the material is simple. However, replacing some metals in some applications, as has been pointed out, makes good scene. I guess the question is really around application.
Dan_Geologist
Posts: 1
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11/20/2015 9:41:05 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 11/15/2015 2:46:58 PM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/15/2015 1:23:19 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 11/15/2015 1:13:41 PM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/15/2015 12:38:13 PM, dee-em wrote:
At 11/15/2015 6:57:57 AM, johnlubba wrote:
At 11/10/2015 6:31:04 AM, Mr_Anderson wrote:
I was talking with a co-worker today who's still in college, and she said she wanted to create or discover a renewable replacement for metal.

Does anybody know of any renewable substance that could act in place of metal? I couldn't think of one, maybe someone else here can.


At the moment the current value of metal per ton in the UK is "20 per ton, as opposed to "120 a year ago, this is because Australia is able to mass produce a cheap quality replacement, What that replacement is exactly I cannot tell you but I know it's enough to cause the scrap industry in Britain to come to a halt.

What? Which metal?

The iron ore price has dived but that is not because of some cheaper alternative. It is because the demand from China has fallen dramatically (they had been stock-piling steel for years anyway) and Australia has been opening new very large mines for an anticipated market that is no longer there. Overproduction with reduced demand has led to the fall in the price. Some iron ore mines are barely viable now. The same thing is occurring with coal mines.

Tell it to someone who cares.

That's fine. There are others here who do care about a fact-based exchange of ideas. I understand if you don't count yourself as one of them. One would have to wonder why you bother posting then?

To interact with people who are not as conceited as yourself.

I wouldn't consider his reply as conceited my friend I think he was just trying to clarify your question. You asked if there was a viable replacement for "metal" and to people with a scientific background this is a very ambiguous question considering that over 75% of the known elements are metals and when you factor in all the various alloys and metallurgical concentrations it is essentially an infinite continuum. So to restate this in simpler terms your question is tantamount to asking something like if there is a possible replacement for liquid.