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where is that energy now?

Mantri
Posts: 23
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2/9/2016 6:12:28 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
it is said that energy can neither be created nor be destroyed.

i do exercise for an hour.

where is that energy now?
Mhykiel
Posts: 5,987
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2/9/2016 6:20:32 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/9/2016 6:12:28 PM, Mantri wrote:
it is said that energy can neither be created nor be destroyed.

i do exercise for an hour.

where is that energy now?

Work to to break chemical bonds released energy into the environment as heat
Ramshutu
Posts: 4,063
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2/9/2016 7:25:01 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/9/2016 6:12:28 PM, Mantri wrote:
it is said that energy can neither be created nor be destroyed.

i do exercise for an hour.

where is that energy now?

Lets say you go cycling.

Your source of energy, is basically the chemicals going through your blood stream. Chemical bonds between different atoms require different amounts of energy to break, and release heat when they are made.

The H-O and C-O bonds within water and carbon dioxide give far more energy out than breaking C-C, C-H, or O-O bonds, which means breaking down those chemicals releases energy.

But enough of the basic chemistry.

So, lets say you go on a bike ride to burn a total of 800 calories.

First off, when you peddle, you are converting energy in your muscles into other forms.

Firstly, you have speed. Your muscles are converting their chemical energy into kinetic energy.

Secondly, you have height. As you climb a hill, you are converting chemical energy into potential energy.

Thirdly, and most, most importantly is friction. Unless you're standing still, your transferring your kinetic energy into the air around you (wind resistance), and the friction with the road surface, tires, brakes, gears, etc; are transferring your muscle energy into heat.

If you start out at the same height as you started (a circular route); basically the energy in your food is converted into heat; you heat the air, and you heat your tires. The former you won't notice much, but the latter you'll always notice if you've felt your tires or brakes after a ride.

Now, in your body itself, in the process of moving your muscles, the chemical reaction produces energy that is partly converted into muscle energy, but also into heat (which is why you get hotter and start sweating when you work out).

To support the muscle movement, you have to breath harder (for more oxygen for the reactions going on), and your heart beats faster (for more o2), the energy in the chemicals you are breaking down can be then converted into muscle movement and kinetic energy in your blood and the air you're breathing in and out; but also into heat again with the friction of your blood within your circulatory system, and the friction between the air and your respiratory system as you breath in and out.

If you always return to the same speed, and elevation as when you started; and you replace all the weights you lift to the proper place (and if you don't, shame on you!), pretty much every single joule of energy you burn goes into heat in some form or fashion somewhere.

The most interesting part of working out, energy and weight is this:

When you are losing weight where does it go?

Most of it you breath out!
v3nesl
Posts: 4,505
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2/9/2016 8:02:45 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/9/2016 6:12:28 PM, Mantri wrote:
it is said that energy can neither be created nor be destroyed.

i do exercise for an hour.

where is that energy now?

I don't know, man, I haven't seen mine for probably ten years now.
This space for rent.
Mantri
Posts: 23
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2/10/2016 6:15:27 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/9/2016 7:25:01 PM, Ramshutu wrote:
At 2/9/2016 6:12:28 PM, Mantri wrote:
it is said that energy can neither be created nor be destroyed.

i do exercise for an hour.

where is that energy now?

Lets say you go cycling.

Your source of energy, is basically the chemicals going through your blood stream. Chemical bonds between different atoms require different amounts of energy to break, and release heat when they are made.

The H-O and C-O bonds within water and carbon dioxide give far more energy out than breaking C-C, C-H, or O-O bonds, which means breaking down those chemicals releases energy.

But enough of the basic chemistry.

So, lets say you go on a bike ride to burn a total of 800 calories.

First off, when you peddle, you are converting energy in your muscles into other forms.

Firstly, you have speed. Your muscles are converting their chemical energy into kinetic energy.

Secondly, you have height. As you climb a hill, you are converting chemical energy into potential energy.

Thirdly, and most, most importantly is friction. Unless you're standing still, your transferring your kinetic energy into the air around you (wind resistance), and the friction with the road surface, tires, brakes, gears, etc; are transferring your muscle energy into heat.

If you start out at the same height as you started (a circular route); basically the energy in your food is converted into heat; you heat the air, and you heat your tires. The former you won't notice much, but the latter you'll always notice if you've felt your tires or brakes after a ride.

Now, in your body itself, in the process of moving your muscles, the chemical reaction produces energy that is partly converted into muscle energy, but also into heat (which is why you get hotter and start sweating when you work out).

To support the muscle movement, you have to breath harder (for more oxygen for the reactions going on), and your heart beats faster (for more o2), the energy in the chemicals you are breaking down can be then converted into muscle movement and kinetic energy in your blood and the air you're breathing in and out; but also into heat again with the friction of your blood within your circulatory system, and the friction between the air and your respiratory system as you breath in and out.

If you always return to the same speed, and elevation as when you started; and you replace all the weights you lift to the proper place (and if you don't, shame on you!), pretty much every single joule of energy you burn goes into heat in some form or fashion somewhere.


The most interesting part of working out, energy and weight is this:

When you are losing weight where does it go?

Most of it you breath out!

What if I light a bulb for an hour.

Where goes that energy?