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Introducing the world's toughest bacteria

NothingSpecial99
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4/28/2016 11:37:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Deinococcus radiodurans holds the Guinness Book of World Record for the world's toughest bacterium. A couple of attributes that make the bacteria so tough is it's ability to live in drought conditions, low-nutrient environments, and most important of all, 1000 times more radiation than the average human.

Part of the reason why the bacteria can live in such high levels of radiation is its DNA repair mechanisms. Anyone familiar with cancer and radiation knows that radiation has the ability to mutate DNA causing diseases such as cancer. In a Wolverine-like fashion (The X-man not the animal), the bacteria has extremely efficient DNA repair mechanisms that could return the DNA to its original state within hours.

Thriving in environments ranging from elephant dung, to the Antarctic dry valleys, its natural habitat can't truly be pinpointed.

Researchers see potential for Deinococcus radiodurans to break down hazardous materials in radioactive waste that would usually kill all bacteria.

http://www.genomenewsnetwork.org...

What do you guys think?
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keithprosser
Posts: 5,112
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4/29/2016 12:34:06 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Of course millions of bacteria were exposed to the same stresses as this bug's ancestors. Most of them never never got the right mutation to help them survive when the going got tough and simply does. But the ancestor of this blighter got lucky and got just the mutation it and getneeded to get through a really bad drought. No intelligent design needed - just dumb luck.
mc9
Posts: 1,849
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4/30/2016 10:18:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2016 11:42:51 PM, someloser wrote:
Thank God it's not infective
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slo1
Posts: 5,199
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5/1/2016 10:58:31 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2016 11:37:29 PM, NothingSpecial99 wrote:
Deinococcus radiodurans holds the Guinness Book of World Record for the world's toughest bacterium. A couple of attributes that make the bacteria so tough is it's ability to live in drought conditions, low-nutrient environments, and most important of all, 1000 times more radiation than the average human.

Part of the reason why the bacteria can live in such high levels of radiation is its DNA repair mechanisms. Anyone familiar with cancer and radiation knows that radiation has the ability to mutate DNA causing diseases such as cancer. In a Wolverine-like fashion (The X-man not the animal), the bacteria has extremely efficient DNA repair mechanisms that could return the DNA to its original state within hours.

Thriving in environments ranging from elephant dung, to the Antarctic dry valleys, its natural habitat can't truly be pinpointed.

Researchers see potential for Deinococcus radiodurans to break down hazardous materials in radioactive waste that would usually kill all bacteria.

http://www.genomenewsnetwork.org...

What do you guys think?

That is funnyhow it was found in a can of spoiled meat that was irradiated. Rather amazing having 4 copies and able to patch a working copy.
PetersSmith
Posts: 6,894
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5/1/2016 11:03:41 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2016 11:37:29 PM, NothingSpecial99 wrote:
Deinococcus radiodurans holds the Guinness Book of World Record for the world's toughest bacterium. A couple of attributes that make the bacteria so tough is it's ability to live in drought conditions, low-nutrient environments, and most important of all, 1000 times more radiation than the average human.

Part of the reason why the bacteria can live in such high levels of radiation is its DNA repair mechanisms. Anyone familiar with cancer and radiation knows that radiation has the ability to mutate DNA causing diseases such as cancer. In a Wolverine-like fashion (The X-man not the animal), the bacteria has extremely efficient DNA repair mechanisms that could return the DNA to its original state within hours.

Thriving in environments ranging from elephant dung, to the Antarctic dry valleys, its natural habitat can't truly be pinpointed.

Researchers see potential for Deinococcus radiodurans to break down hazardous materials in radioactive waste that would usually kill all bacteria.

http://www.genomenewsnetwork.org...

What do you guys think?

I wonder if we can use this for medical purposes.
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keithprosser
Posts: 5,112
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5/2/2016 12:44:30 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/1/2016 11:03:41 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 4/28/2016 11:37:29 PM, NothingSpecial99 wrote:
Deinococcus radiodurans holds the Guinness Book of World Record for the world's toughest bacterium. A couple of attributes that make the bacteria so tough is it's ability to live in drought conditions, low-nutrient environments, and most important of all, 1000 times more radiation than the average human.

Part of the reason why the bacteria can live in such high levels of radiation is its DNA repair mechanisms. Anyone familiar with cancer and radiation knows that radiation has the ability to mutate DNA causing diseases such as cancer. In a Wolverine-like fashion (The X-man not the animal), the bacteria has extremely efficient DNA repair mechanisms that could return the DNA to its original state within hours.

Thriving in environments ranging from elephant dung, to the Antarctic dry valleys, its natural habitat can't truly be pinpointed.

Researchers see potential for Deinococcus radiodurans to break down hazardous materials in radioactive waste that would usually kill all bacteria.

http://www.genomenewsnetwork.org...

What do you guys think?

I wonder if we can use this for medical purposes.

It might be too tough. Suppose it was genetically modified to produce LPA or some other anti-radiation drug. To make full use of DRs remarkable powers the patient would have to be radiating 1000x times the human fatal dose (otherwise you could just as well use a more convenient, less radiation resistant bug). I have no idea what condition a patient radiating 1000x times the human fatal dose would be in, but I'm pretty sure they would be beyond the powers of LPA to put right!!
Axonly
Posts: 2,612
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6/15/2016 3:55:28 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2016 11:37:29 PM, NothingSpecial99 wrote:
Deinococcus radiodurans holds the Guinness Book of World Record for the world's toughest bacterium. A couple of attributes that make the bacteria so tough is it's ability to live in drought conditions, low-nutrient environments, and most important of all, 1000 times more radiation than the average human.

Part of the reason why the bacteria can live in such high levels of radiation is its DNA repair mechanisms. Anyone familiar with cancer and radiation knows that radiation has the ability to mutate DNA causing diseases such as cancer. In a Wolverine-like fashion (The X-man not the animal), the bacteria has extremely efficient DNA repair mechanisms that could return the DNA to its original state within hours.

Thriving in environments ranging from elephant dung, to the Antarctic dry valleys, its natural habitat can't truly be pinpointed.

Researchers see potential for Deinococcus radiodurans to break down hazardous materials in radioactive waste that would usually kill all bacteria.

http://www.genomenewsnetwork.org...

What do you guys think?

Oh wow, personally I would have thought Archaea would have the toughest organism, since they are mostly extremophiles.
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