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Question about Prions

Axonly
Posts: 1,802
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6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
I have recently developed a great interest in Prions. My question is simply, why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?
Meh!
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 994
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6/6/2016 9:58:07 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM, Axonly wrote:
I have recently developed a great interest in Prions. My question is simply, why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?

I think a simple answer would be that prions aren't as common as the other pathogens you have mentioned, and most possibly are less efficient at multiplying.
Axonly
Posts: 1,802
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6/6/2016 10:13:02 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 6/6/2016 9:58:07 AM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM, Axonly wrote:
I have recently developed a great interest in Prions. My question is simply, why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?

I think a simple answer would be that prions aren't as common as the other pathogens you have mentioned, and most possibly are less efficient at multiplying.

That bothers me because they are in ways similar to Viruses, ie they enter the body, and create replicas of themselves from the hosts cells (If virus) or proteins (If prion). The proteins Prions convert (PrP^C) are found in the membranes of the cells, so I assume that the proteins needed for conversion are far more common than cells, so theoretically, at this stage Prions could be produced faster than viruses.
Meh!
Syko
Posts: 393
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6/6/2016 2:26:30 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
Prions don't have a viable vector mechanism that allows transmission from host to host. Yes it's infectious, but not as much as viruses and bacteria.

Viruses cause symptoms that force the affected individual to expel copies of the virus in mucus, which then becomes airborne and able to infect many others.

Bacteria can create stable colonies that can thrive without a host until another host picks it up.

Prions simply sit in their host and kill it.
For Mother Russia.
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 994
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6/6/2016 3:07:41 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 6/6/2016 10:13:02 AM, Axonly wrote:
At 6/6/2016 9:58:07 AM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM, Axonly wrote:
I have recently developed a great interest in Prions. My question is simply, why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?

I think a simple answer would be that prions aren't as common as the other pathogens you have mentioned, and most possibly are less efficient at multiplying.

That bothers me because they are in ways similar to Viruses, ie they enter the body, and create replicas of themselves from the hosts cells (If virus) or proteins (If prion). The proteins Prions convert (PrP^C) are found in the membranes of the cells, so I assume that the proteins needed for conversion are far more common than cells, so theoretically, at this stage Prions could be produced faster than viruses.

But they don't have the same mechanisms as viruses do; meaning that they're more primitive.
RuvDraba
Posts: 6,033
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6/6/2016 6:54:34 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM, Axonly wrote:
why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?
There's a very nice survey paper from 2005 on the public health impact of prion disease, which I found on the CDC website, Ax. [http://www.cdc.gov...]

It's clear from the paper that there are only a few ways to transmit prion disease. The ways listed include surgical grafts, prion-contaminated blood transfusion, and the consumption of meat fed with prion-contaminated proteins from another animal.

Since farmed meat is (mostly) herbivorous, it's actually human action producing prion risks in food -- for example, feeding animals meal containing proteins of other animals that they wouldn't ordinarily eat. Epidemiologists have also identified (but not detailed) evidence of a 'cross-species barrier' reducing infection rates.

Epidemiologically, a prion is a contagious pathogen, so there are vectors for contagion, but prions don't seem to evolve or compete to reproduce as do viruses and bacteria, and species seem to have evolved to deal with prion risks themselves. So humans have to do something very silly or unfortunate to catch a prion disease.

Here's the CDC prion page for further context: [http://www.cdc.gov...]
Axonly
Posts: 1,802
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6/7/2016 12:13:11 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 6/6/2016 6:54:34 PM, RuvDraba wrote:
At 6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM, Axonly wrote:
why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?
There's a very nice survey paper from 2005 on the public health impact of prion disease, which I found on the CDC website, Ax. [http://www.cdc.gov...]

It's clear from the paper that there are only a few ways to transmit prion disease. The ways listed include surgical grafts, prion-contaminated blood transfusion, and the consumption of meat fed with prion-contaminated proteins from another animal.

Since farmed meat is (mostly) herbivorous, it's actually human action producing prion risks in food -- for example, feeding animals meal containing proteins of other animals that they wouldn't ordinarily eat. Epidemiologists have also identified (but not detailed) evidence of a 'cross-species barrier' reducing infection rates.

Epidemiologically, a prion is a contagious pathogen, so there are vectors for contagion, but prions don't seem to evolve or compete to reproduce as do viruses and bacteria, and species seem to have evolved to deal with prion risks themselves. So humans have to do something very silly or unfortunate to catch a prion disease.

Here's the CDC prion page for further context: [http://www.cdc.gov...]

Ah, that makes sense.
Meh!
Akhenaten
Posts: 854
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6/7/2016 12:44:01 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM, Axonly wrote:
I have recently developed a great interest in Prions. My question is simply, why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?
Prions are just like viruses. They don't exist! Its just an excuse to blame lives stock disease on some minuscule life form rather than the obvious which is pesticides.
Axonly
Posts: 1,802
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6/7/2016 1:24:42 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 6/7/2016 12:44:01 AM, Akhenaten wrote:
At 6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM, Axonly wrote:
I have recently developed a great interest in Prions. My question is simply, why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?
Prions are just like viruses. They don't exist! Its just an excuse to blame lives stock disease on some minuscule life form rather than the obvious which is pesticides.



http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net...
Meh!
Leugen9001
Posts: 495
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6/7/2016 4:22:41 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 6/7/2016 12:44:01 AM, Akhenaten wrote:
At 6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM, Axonly wrote:
I have recently developed a great interest in Prions. My question is simply, why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?
Prions are just like viruses. They don't exist! Its just an excuse to blame lives stock disease on some minuscule life form rather than the obvious which is pesticides.



If CJD wasn't due to prions, then why did instances of it drop in Britain after they stopped feeding dead cows to other cows? (http://www.telegraph.co.uk...)
:) nac
Akhenaten
Posts: 854
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6/7/2016 3:01:33 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 6/7/2016 4:22:41 AM, Leugen9001 wrote:
At 6/7/2016 12:44:01 AM, Akhenaten wrote:
At 6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM, Axonly wrote:
I have recently developed a great interest in Prions. My question is simply, why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?
Prions are just like viruses. They don't exist! Its just an excuse to blame lives stock disease on some minuscule life form rather than the obvious which is pesticides.



If CJD wasn't due to prions, then why did instances of it drop in Britain after they stopped feeding dead cows to other cows? (http://www.telegraph.co.uk...)

Just because you are vegetarian doesn't mean that you can't become poisoned with pesticides and herbicides. Chemical poisoning is the basic cause of CJD, not prions. The vegetarian case shows that I am right and the authorities are wrong. If you eat either chemically infected meat or chemically infected vegetables you will get the same problem.

Note - Prions and viruses are just legal escape clauses which prevent litigation against pharmaceutical companies.
Axonly
Posts: 1,802
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6/12/2016 3:07:19 AM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/7/2016 4:22:41 AM, Leugen9001 wrote:
At 6/7/2016 12:44:01 AM, Akhenaten wrote:
At 6/6/2016 8:30:40 AM, Axonly wrote:
I have recently developed a great interest in Prions. My question is simply, why aren't Prions as common as bacterial or virus infections?
Prions are just like viruses. They don't exist! Its just an excuse to blame lives stock disease on some minuscule life form rather than the obvious which is pesticides.



If CJD wasn't due to prions, then why did instances of it drop in Britain after they stopped feeding dead cows to other cows? (http://www.telegraph.co.uk...)

According to Akhetaken, it's all a big world wide conspiracy.
Meh!