Total Posts:3|Showing Posts:1-3
Jump to topic:

Ligand field theory?

Fkkize
Posts: 2,149
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/9/2016 1:34:50 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
Can someone recommend a book/ online resource on LFT?

Any help is appreciated.
: At 7/2/2016 3:05:07 PM, Rational_Thinker9119 wrote:
:
: space contradicts logic
RuvDraba
Posts: 6,033
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/9/2016 9:42:37 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/9/2016 1:34:50 PM, Fkkize wrote:
Can someone recommend a book/ online resource on LFT?
Any help is appreciated.

It's not my 'field' (ahem), but the model has been around since the late 1960s, so there'll be papers and countless academic texts. Are you interested in the history, seminal papers and texts, technical application in modern chemistry, or do you just background? I ask because usually you get one but not the others, depending on what you read.

Also, Fkkize, you're well ahead of the undergraduate curve in terms of self-directed learning. If you'd like postgrad level tips on how to research, please poke. This forum has several members who can help. Certain minds don't enjoy being spoon-fed, and as one of them, I completely sympathise. :D
Fkkize
Posts: 2,149
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/10/2016 7:19:04 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/9/2016 9:42:37 PM, RuvDraba wrote:
At 6/9/2016 1:34:50 PM, Fkkize wrote:
Can someone recommend a book/ online resource on LFT?
Any help is appreciated.

It's not my 'field' (ahem), but the model has been around since the late 1960s, so there'll be papers and countless academic texts. Are you interested in the history, seminal papers and texts, technical application in modern chemistry, or do you just background? I ask because usually you get one but not the others, depending on what you read.
I am looking for a textbook explaining it, because English one's tend to be written simpler than the one's I have immediate access to, written in my native language (or other languages in general).

Also, Fkkize, you're well ahead of the undergraduate curve in terms of self-directed learning.
I appreciate the nice words, but at least here that's not the case. Bonding theories, like valence-bond-, crystal-field-, ligand-field- and molecular orbital theory are standard topics of second semester inorganic chemistry. Without the mathematical depth, of course.

If you'd like postgrad level tips on how to research, please poke. This forum has several members who can help. Certain minds don't enjoy being spoon-fed, and as one of them, I completely sympathise. :D

Thanks, I'll definitely come back to it :)
: At 7/2/2016 3:05:07 PM, Rational_Thinker9119 wrote:
:
: space contradicts logic