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Tetraquark Confirmed

slo1
Posts: 4,318
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7/11/2016 12:33:15 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
https://www.sciencedaily.com...

Physicists have made science history by confirming the existence of a rare four-quark particle and discovering evidence of three other 'exotic' siblings. Their findings are based on data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's biggest, most powerful particle accelerator, located at the CERN science laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland.
slo1
Posts: 4,318
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7/11/2016 12:49:10 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
This is a confirmation of the original discovery by the Belle Collaboration somewhere around 2008.

I'm curious to see how this impacts physics. I have heard there are implications on neutron stars and the theoretical quark star.

I have to imagine this probably adds more questions to the quark epoch and hadron epoch of big bang than resolves. I'm not certain if it could help explain how hadron and anti hadron particles didn't 100% angulate each other.

Any ideas on how this confirmation of more than quarks forming a particle may impact physics and astrophysics?
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 994
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7/11/2016 1:21:12 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/11/2016 12:33:15 PM, slo1 wrote:
https://www.sciencedaily.com...

Physicists have made science history by confirming the existence of a rare four-quark particle and discovering evidence of three other 'exotic' siblings. Their findings are based on data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's biggest, most powerful particle accelerator, located at the CERN science laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland.

Interesting; I wonder how these particles function.
keithprosser
Posts: 1,948
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7/11/2016 3:31:52 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
Interesting; I wonder how these particles function.
You don't wonder how 3 quark particles function?
chui
Posts: 507
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7/12/2016 8:37:48 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/11/2016 1:21:12 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 7/11/2016 12:33:15 PM, slo1 wrote:
https://www.sciencedaily.com...

Physicists have made science history by confirming the existence of a rare four-quark particle and discovering evidence of three other 'exotic' siblings. Their findings are based on data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's biggest, most powerful particle accelerator, located at the CERN science laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland.

Interesting; I wonder how these particles function.

From what I can make out they are like two mesons joined together ie two quarks and two anti quarks. The article does not say which quarks but I'm guessing they are first generation quarks. They must be very unstable and probably have decay times so short that they are detected by their decay products because they can't be tracked directly. Their mass is similar to an alpha particle, which is surprising since pi mesons are much lighter than protons usually. The mass will be 99% gluon and 1% quark. The quarks will be in two color anti color pairs and will be constantly exchanging gluon.
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 994
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7/13/2016 2:05:20 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/12/2016 8:37:48 PM, chui wrote:
At 7/11/2016 1:21:12 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 7/11/2016 12:33:15 PM, slo1 wrote:
https://www.sciencedaily.com...

Physicists have made science history by confirming the existence of a rare four-quark particle and discovering evidence of three other 'exotic' siblings. Their findings are based on data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's biggest, most powerful particle accelerator, located at the CERN science laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland.

Interesting; I wonder how these particles function.

From what I can make out they are like two mesons joined together ie two quarks and two anti quarks. The article does not say which quarks but I'm guessing they are first generation quarks. They must be very unstable and probably have decay times so short that they are detected by their decay products because they can't be tracked directly. Their mass is similar to an alpha particle, which is surprising since pi mesons are much lighter than protons usually. The mass will be 99% gluon and 1% quark. The quarks will be in two color anti color pairs and will be constantly exchanging gluon.

Interesting; but since they decay so quickly, I highly doubt that there is much practical application to this discovery (not entirely dismissing the option, scientists are creative people).