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Simple way to measure the earth's curvature.

KthulhuHimself
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10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.
kevin24018
Posts: 1,804
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10/10/2016 6:11:48 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

the argument would be you can only see so far, atmospheric distortion etc, though I never verified it or anything an example of this was, a boat that disappears off the horizon, hull first then mast can be seen with a telescope in it's entirety, so perhaps using ones vision isn't so good after all.
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 993
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10/10/2016 6:34:09 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/10/2016 6:11:48 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

the argument would be you can only see so far, atmospheric distortion etc, though I never verified it or anything an example of this was, a boat that disappears off the horizon, hull first then mast can be seen with a telescope in it's entirety, so perhaps using ones vision isn't so good after all.

Well, if the day's clear, you will be able to do this; where I did the experiment I had pretty good vision.
kevin24018
Posts: 1,804
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10/10/2016 6:52:41 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/10/2016 6:34:09 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:11:48 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

the argument would be you can only see so far, atmospheric distortion etc, though I never verified it or anything an example of this was, a boat that disappears off the horizon, hull first then mast can be seen with a telescope in it's entirety, so perhaps using ones vision isn't so good after all.

Well, if the day's clear, you will be able to do this; where I did the experiment I had pretty good vision.

the arguments I saw said it's because we don't have infinite vision is why the boat and telescope thing proves you can't use the naked eye, again don't know if it's true, but there's also an "experiment" with a laser and 2 board which I guess makes a straight line and if the earth is curved the height of the laser on the further away board should be higher but they say it's the same.
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 993
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10/11/2016 7:29:32 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/10/2016 6:52:41 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:34:09 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:11:48 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

the argument would be you can only see so far, atmospheric distortion etc, though I never verified it or anything an example of this was, a boat that disappears off the horizon, hull first then mast can be seen with a telescope in it's entirety, so perhaps using ones vision isn't so good after all.

Well, if the day's clear, you will be able to do this; where I did the experiment I had pretty good vision.

the arguments I saw said it's because we don't have infinite vision is why the boat and telescope thing proves you can't use the naked eye, again don't know if it's true, but there's also an "experiment" with a laser and 2 board which I guess makes a straight line and if the earth is curved the height of the laser on the further away board should be higher but they say it's the same.

I don't really see your point; mind summing it up?
kevin24018
Posts: 1,804
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10/11/2016 12:12:23 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/11/2016 7:29:32 AM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:52:41 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:34:09 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:11:48 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

the argument would be you can only see so far, atmospheric distortion etc, though I never verified it or anything an example of this was, a boat that disappears off the horizon, hull first then mast can be seen with a telescope in it's entirety, so perhaps using ones vision isn't so good after all.

Well, if the day's clear, you will be able to do this; where I did the experiment I had pretty good vision.

the arguments I saw said it's because we don't have infinite vision is why the boat and telescope thing proves you can't use the naked eye, again don't know if it's true, but there's also an "experiment" with a laser and 2 board which I guess makes a straight line and if the earth is curved the height of the laser on the further away board should be higher but they say it's the same.

I don't really see your point; mind summing it up?

if there's a curve at a certain distance there should be a drop, like the horizon thing, a laser is a straight beam so lets say you have 2 6 foot boards, at 4 miles away where the beam strikes the board should be one inch higher on the board than the one right next to it, provided it's parallel etc.
have watched the whole thing yet https://youtu.be... but you can search using the title.
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 993
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10/11/2016 1:03:47 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/11/2016 12:12:23 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/11/2016 7:29:32 AM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:52:41 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:34:09 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:11:48 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

the argument would be you can only see so far, atmospheric distortion etc, though I never verified it or anything an example of this was, a boat that disappears off the horizon, hull first then mast can be seen with a telescope in it's entirety, so perhaps using ones vision isn't so good after all.

Well, if the day's clear, you will be able to do this; where I did the experiment I had pretty good vision.

the arguments I saw said it's because we don't have infinite vision is why the boat and telescope thing proves you can't use the naked eye, again don't know if it's true, but there's also an "experiment" with a laser and 2 board which I guess makes a straight line and if the earth is curved the height of the laser on the further away board should be higher but they say it's the same.

I don't really see your point; mind summing it up?

if there's a curve at a certain distance there should be a drop, like the horizon thing, a laser is a straight beam so lets say you have 2 6 foot boards, at 4 miles away where the beam strikes the board should be one inch higher on the board than the one right next to it, provided it's parallel etc.
have watched the whole thing yet https://youtu.be... but you can search using the title.

I'll let the comments on this video sum it up for me, as this type of argument has been refuted countless times:

"Sorry but the video doesn't prove much. At 4 miles apart, the bump at 2 miles (in the middle) is 32 inches high. Your camera was already a bit higher than that, so it should see below that. The cardboard looked to be pretty high up on the beach... Plus, that laser is going through an atmosphere and can get refracted."

"I find it amusing that all the flat-earth laser efforts finish at around 3-4 miles because after that you start getting results you don't want - results that prove curvature. You literally can't admit that data, so you don't show it.A279;"

"I set up a similar laser. fastened it securely to the earth, and made it where it could be adjusted in minute increments using adjustment screws. So there was no movement in the light spot on the other side of the lake, unless i was adjusting the level of the laser beam. On a half mile wide lake. (2 helpers. One on each side of lake, to verify that everything was as I left it) (We were all three in voice contact the whole time) Lake was no waves, smooth as glass, very still night. Small lake. CENTER of laser beam of light was adjusted to be exactly 6 inches high on both sides of lake. (The beam was hitting the vertical side of a big rock on the other side of the lake. This flat side was almost exactly perpendicular to the water ) I took a measuring tape and measure from the water to the laser beam on both shore lines of the lake. they both measured 6 inches to the CENTER of the laser beam. I then took a small boat and rowed out to the middle of the lake. I measured it from the CENTER of the laser beam to the water of the lake. It measured clearly, only 4 inches. I repeated this experiment 5 different nights! Always 3.5 inches to 4.5 inches in the middle of the lake. That is 2 inches curve in 1/4mile! Easy to do experiment! Please explain that, flat earth guys. Anyone that thinks this is a flat earth, just try this experiment. Light goes in strait lines. Measuring tapes DO NOT LIE. I think you could do it on a much smaller body of water. I just happened to live on a 1/2 mile wide lake. But probably even a 500 foot diameter lake, would be enough to verify this. Or maybe even a swimming pool. If anyone else does this test, or a similar test, please post your results. "
v3nesl
Posts: 4,460
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10/11/2016 1:53:01 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

Sounds like fun! What did you come up with? What were your calculations for the radius or diameter of the earth?
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Edlvsjd
Posts: 1,536
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10/12/2016 5:30:34 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/11/2016 1:03:47 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/11/2016 12:12:23 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/11/2016 7:29:32 AM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:52:41 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:34:09 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:11:48 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

the argument would be you can only see so far, atmospheric distortion etc, though I never verified it or anything an example of this was, a boat that disappears off the horizon, hull first then mast can be seen with a telescope in it's entirety, so perhaps using ones vision isn't so good after all.

Well, if the day's clear, you will be able to do this; where I did the experiment I had pretty good vision.

the arguments I saw said it's because we don't have infinite vision is why the boat and telescope thing proves you can't use the naked eye, again don't know if it's true, but there's also an "experiment" with a laser and 2 board which I guess makes a straight line and if the earth is curved the height of the laser on the further away board should be higher but they say it's the same.

I don't really see your point; mind summing it up?

if there's a curve at a certain distance there should be a drop, like the horizon thing, a laser is a straight beam so lets say you have 2 6 foot boards, at 4 miles away where the beam strikes the board should be one inch higher on the board than the one right next to it, provided it's parallel etc.
have watched the whole thing yet https://youtu.be... but you can search using the title.

I'll let the comments on this video sum it up for me, as this type of argument has been refuted countless times:

"Sorry but the video doesn't prove much. At 4 miles apart, the bump at 2 miles (in the middle) is 32 inches high. Your camera was already a bit higher than that, so it should see below that. The cardboard looked to be pretty high up on the beach... Plus, that laser is going through an atmosphere and can get refracted."

"I find it amusing that all the flat-earth laser efforts finish at around 3-4 miles because after that you start getting results you don't want - results that prove curvature. You literally can't admit that data, so you don't show it.A279;"

6 miles https://youtu.be...

"I set up a similar laser. fastened it securely to the earth, and made it where it could be adjusted in minute increments using adjustment screws. So there was no movement in the light spot on the other side of the lake, unless i was adjusting the level of the laser beam. On a half mile wide lake. (2 helpers. One on each side of lake, to verify that everything was as I left it) (We were all three in voice contact the whole time) Lake was no waves, smooth as glass, very still night. Small lake. CENTER of laser beam of light was adjusted to be exactly 6 inches high on both sides of lake. (The beam was hitting the vertical side of a big rock on the other side of the lake. This flat side was almost exactly perpendicular to the water ) I took a measuring tape and measure from the water to the laser beam on both shore lines of the lake. they both measured 6 inches to the CENTER of the laser beam. I then took a small boat and rowed out to the middle of the lake. I measured it from the CENTER of the laser beam to the water of the lake. It measured clearly, only 4 inches. I repeated this experiment 5 different nights! Always 3.5 inches to 4.5 inches in the middle of the lake. That is 2 inches curve in 1/4mile! Easy to do experiment! Please explain that, flat earth guys. Anyone that thinks this is a flat earth, just try this experiment. Light goes in strait lines. Measuring tapes DO NOT LIE. I think you could do it on a much smaller body of water. I just happened to live on a 1/2 mile wide lake. But probably even a 500 foot diameter lake, would be enough to verify this. Or maybe even a swimming pool. If anyone else does this test, or a similar test, please post your results. "
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com...
Edlvsjd
Posts: 1,536
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10/12/2016 5:37:46 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
https://youtu.be...

Think you did it wrong, or more likely, not at all.
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com...
DanneJeRusse
Posts: 12,566
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10/12/2016 2:10:09 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/12/2016 5:30:34 AM, Edlvsjd wrote:
At 10/11/2016 1:03:47 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/11/2016 12:12:23 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/11/2016 7:29:32 AM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:52:41 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:34:09 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:11:48 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

the argument would be you can only see so far, atmospheric distortion etc, though I never verified it or anything an example of this was, a boat that disappears off the horizon, hull first then mast can be seen with a telescope in it's entirety, so perhaps using ones vision isn't so good after all.

Well, if the day's clear, you will be able to do this; where I did the experiment I had pretty good vision.

the arguments I saw said it's because we don't have infinite vision is why the boat and telescope thing proves you can't use the naked eye, again don't know if it's true, but there's also an "experiment" with a laser and 2 board which I guess makes a straight line and if the earth is curved the height of the laser on the further away board should be higher but they say it's the same.

I don't really see your point; mind summing it up?

if there's a curve at a certain distance there should be a drop, like the horizon thing, a laser is a straight beam so lets say you have 2 6 foot boards, at 4 miles away where the beam strikes the board should be one inch higher on the board than the one right next to it, provided it's parallel etc.
have watched the whole thing yet https://youtu.be... but you can search using the title.

I'll let the comments on this video sum it up for me, as this type of argument has been refuted countless times:

"Sorry but the video doesn't prove much. At 4 miles apart, the bump at 2 miles (in the middle) is 32 inches high. Your camera was already a bit higher than that, so it should see below that. The cardboard looked to be pretty high up on the beach... Plus, that laser is going through an atmosphere and can get refracted."

"I find it amusing that all the flat-earth laser efforts finish at around 3-4 miles because after that you start getting results you don't want - results that prove curvature. You literally can't admit that data, so you don't show it.A279;"

6 miles https://youtu.be...

This one comment encapsulates that video...

"Video unusable as evidence for anything. This is not science.A279;"
Marrying a 6 year old and waiting until she reaches puberty and maturity before having consensual sex is better than walking up to
a stranger in a bar and proceeding to have relations with no valid proof of the intent of the person. Muhammad wins. ~ Fatihah
If they don't want to be killed then they have to subdue to the Islamic laws. - Uncung
Without God, you are lower than sh!t. ~ SpiritandTruth
DanneJeRusse
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10/12/2016 2:14:00 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/12/2016 5:43:22 AM, Edlvsjd wrote:
https://youtu.be...

This comment encapsulates that video...

"I find it amusing that all the flat-earth laser efforts finish at around 3-4 miles because after that you start getting results you don't want - results that prove curvature. "

I already provided a video from a guy with a home made rocket that clearly showed the earths curvature at 120K feet. You're done here.
Marrying a 6 year old and waiting until she reaches puberty and maturity before having consensual sex is better than walking up to
a stranger in a bar and proceeding to have relations with no valid proof of the intent of the person. Muhammad wins. ~ Fatihah
If they don't want to be killed then they have to subdue to the Islamic laws. - Uncung
Without God, you are lower than sh!t. ~ SpiritandTruth
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 993
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10/13/2016 3:50:56 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/11/2016 1:53:01 PM, v3nesl wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

Sounds like fun! What did you come up with?
Well, to mitigate the error, I did many measurements; so I don't remember every single result, but I do remember a few.

For example, I got around 0.7 degrees for a height of 500m; and something around 1.43 degrees at the height of (about) 2km.
What were your calculations for the radius or diameter of the earth?

As presented in OP, 2*h/(tan(a))^2 is the radius, so 4*h/(tan(a))^2 is the diameter.
v3nesl
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10/13/2016 3:55:26 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/13/2016 3:50:56 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/11/2016 1:53:01 PM, v3nesl wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

Sounds like fun! What did you come up with?
Well, to mitigate the error, I did many measurements; so I don't remember every single result, but I do remember a few.

For example, I got around 0.7 degrees for a height of 500m; and something around 1.43 degrees at the height of (about) 2km.
What were your calculations for the radius or diameter of the earth?

As presented in OP, 2*h/(tan(a))^2 is the radius, so 4*h/(tan(a))^2 is the diameter.

Yeah, so what did you get for radius or diameter?
This space for rent.
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 993
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10/13/2016 4:04:05 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/12/2016 5:30:34 AM, Edlvsjd wrote:
At 10/11/2016 1:03:47 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/11/2016 12:12:23 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/11/2016 7:29:32 AM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:52:41 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:34:09 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:11:48 PM, kevin24018 wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

the argument would be you can only see so far, atmospheric distortion etc, though I never verified it or anything an example of this was, a boat that disappears off the horizon, hull first then mast can be seen with a telescope in it's entirety, so perhaps using ones vision isn't so good after all.

Well, if the day's clear, you will be able to do this; where I did the experiment I had pretty good vision.

the arguments I saw said it's because we don't have infinite vision is why the boat and telescope thing proves you can't use the naked eye, again don't know if it's true, but there's also an "experiment" with a laser and 2 board which I guess makes a straight line and if the earth is curved the height of the laser on the further away board should be higher but they say it's the same.

I don't really see your point; mind summing it up?

if there's a curve at a certain distance there should be a drop, like the horizon thing, a laser is a straight beam so lets say you have 2 6 foot boards, at 4 miles away where the beam strikes the board should be one inch higher on the board than the one right next to it, provided it's parallel etc.
have watched the whole thing yet https://youtu.be... but you can search using the title.

I'll let the comments on this video sum it up for me, as this type of argument has been refuted countless times:

"Sorry but the video doesn't prove much. At 4 miles apart, the bump at 2 miles (in the middle) is 32 inches high. Your camera was already a bit higher than that, so it should see below that. The cardboard looked to be pretty high up on the beach... Plus, that laser is going through an atmosphere and can get refracted."

"I find it amusing that all the flat-earth laser efforts finish at around 3-4 miles because after that you start getting results you don't want - results that prove curvature. You literally can't admit that data, so you don't show it.A279;"

6 miles https://youtu.be...
Three things:

One, the total hump of ground between the two people here would only be 1.81m, or 5.938ft; as the calculation in the video is incorrect.

Two, this is still a small distance of only 6 miles, still proves nothing.

And three, as with the previous video; this has been refuted so many times and shown to be fallacious and malformed so often, that even the comment section is all you need to disprove the video. I'm not even going to bother quoting it, as it's all just right there for you to look at.
KthulhuHimself
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10/13/2016 4:09:26 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/13/2016 3:55:26 PM, v3nesl wrote:
At 10/13/2016 3:50:56 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/11/2016 1:53:01 PM, v3nesl wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results.

Sounds like fun! What did you come up with?
Well, to mitigate the error, I did many measurements; so I don't remember every single result, but I do remember a few.

For example, I got around 0.7 degrees for a height of 500m; and something around 1.43 degrees at the height of (about) 2km.
What were your calculations for the radius or diameter of the earth?

As presented in OP, 2*h/(tan(a))^2 is the radius, so 4*h/(tan(a))^2 is the diameter.

Yeah, so what did you get for radius or diameter?

I got an average, as there was some error; so the final result was ~6,299,340m (this clearly isn't very accurate, but quite good nonetheless).
v3nesl
Posts: 4,460
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10/13/2016 5:04:06 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/13/2016 4:09:26 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
...
Yeah, so what did you get for radius or diameter?

I got an average, as there was some error; so the final result was ~6,299,340m (this clearly isn't very accurate, but quite good nonetheless).

That's for radius I presume, which equals 3914 miles. Google says 3959 miles, so I'd say your numbers are pretty impressive. Congratulations!
This space for rent.
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 993
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10/13/2016 6:05:25 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/13/2016 5:04:06 PM, v3nesl wrote:
At 10/13/2016 4:09:26 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
...
Yeah, so what did you get for radius or diameter?

I got an average, as there was some error; so the final result was ~6,299,340m (this clearly isn't very accurate, but quite good nonetheless).

That's for radius I presume, which equals 3914 miles. Google says 3959 miles, so I'd say your numbers are pretty impressive. Congratulations!

Thanks; it was for radius, indeed (diameters are almost never used in mathematics).
Ramshutu
Posts: 4,063
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10/13/2016 6:12:14 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/13/2016 6:05:25 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/13/2016 5:04:06 PM, v3nesl wrote:
At 10/13/2016 4:09:26 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
...
Yeah, so what did you get for radius or diameter?

I got an average, as there was some error; so the final result was ~6,299,340m (this clearly isn't very accurate, but quite good nonetheless).

That's for radius I presume, which equals 3914 miles. Google says 3959 miles, so I'd say your numbers are pretty impressive. Congratulations!

Thanks; it was for radius, indeed (diameters are almost never used in mathematics).

That's within only a few percent error, well done!
KthulhuHimself
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10/13/2016 6:18:44 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/13/2016 6:12:14 PM, Ramshutu wrote:
At 10/13/2016 6:05:25 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
At 10/13/2016 5:04:06 PM, v3nesl wrote:
At 10/13/2016 4:09:26 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
...
Yeah, so what did you get for radius or diameter?

I got an average, as there was some error; so the final result was ~6,299,340m (this clearly isn't very accurate, but quite good nonetheless).

That's for radius I presume, which equals 3914 miles. Google says 3959 miles, so I'd say your numbers are pretty impressive. Congratulations!

Thanks; it was for radius, indeed (diameters are almost never used in mathematics).

That's within only a few percent error, well done!

The visibility was excellent that day; and thanks.
KthulhuHimself
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10/14/2016 5:01:28 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/12/2016 5:37:46 AM, Edlvsjd wrote:
https://youtu.be...

Think you did it wrong, or more likely, not at all.

Not that you're willing to do it yourself.
Liveone
Posts: 64
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10/30/2016 2:44:52 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results : :

It works great on paper but land surveyors used level grids. They don't use any math that concerns the curvature of the earth. Each grid they exist on is level to them and that's all they care about so when they shoot a set of railroad tracks, it's level to the grid unless the tracks have slope in them such as going up and down hills. They are never set to the curvature of the earth.
KthulhuHimself
Posts: 993
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10/31/2016 5:47:42 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/30/2016 2:44:52 PM, Liveone wrote:
At 10/10/2016 6:06:57 PM, KthulhuHimself wrote:
This is a fun and simple experiment that anyone can do, which will let you measure not only the curvature of the earth, but also its radius.

1) Take a disc and glue a bead to its middle, and then take a string, make a tie in one end, then place it through the hole of the bead; hold this by the string, place it so that you can see neither its bottom nor its top, and give the disc a little spin; if you still can't see the top or bottom of the disc as it spins, then CONGRATULATIONS! You've just created an easy-to-use level, which you can compare the horizon to.

2) Go somewhere high from whence a beach is clearly visible (should be above a mile for you to notice the curvature), and take note of your height; oh, and make sure you can access many slightly varying altitudes from that place, to mitigate the error.

3) Hold the level such that neither its bottom nor top are visible, to create your point of comparison (the disc is where the horizon should be if the earth was a flat surface).

4) By this point, you'll see that the actual horizon is slightly below the flat horizon, the angle between the two being the earth's curvature.

If you want to calculate the earth's radius, do as follows:

Take the angle you've measured between the two horizons, we'll call it "a" for now.
Take the height above sea-level the point you're standing at is, we'll call it "h" for now.

The earth's radius is (roughly) equal in meters to the following expression:

2*h/(tan(a))^2 (h must be in meters for this to work.)

Simple, right? I've done this a couple of times, and it was quite fun seeing the results : :

It works great on paper but land surveyors used level grids. They don't use any math that concerns the curvature of the earth. Each grid they exist on is level to them and that's all they care about so when they shoot a set of railroad tracks, it's level to the grid unless the tracks have slope in them such as going up and down hills. They are never set to the curvature of the earth.

Unless we're talking here about distances over 200km, the curvature doesn't really matter that much; come to think of it, you never really calculate anything relevant to such distances even if the actual railroad is that long. Keep in mind that this wasn't just on paper, also; I actually did go out and measure this.