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Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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2/8/2011 9:49:43 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
The human body is made up of roughly 7×10 (to the 27th power) atoms. With all those atoms comes the attendant space between the nuclei and the electrons. With all that space and all those atoms, what keeps us together? Is it gravity, strong or weak nuclear force or electromagnetism...?
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Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
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2/8/2011 11:07:27 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/8/2011 9:49:43 AM, theLwerd wrote:
The human body is made up of roughly 7×10 (to the 27th power) atoms. With all those atoms comes the attendant space between the nuclei and the electrons. With all that space and all those atoms, what keeps us together? Is it gravity, strong or weak nuclear force or electromagnetism...?

It's God you foolish fool!
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
mattrodstrom
Posts: 12,028
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2/8/2011 11:10:13 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/8/2011 9:49:43 AM, theLwerd wrote:
The human body is made up of roughly 7×10 (to the 27th power) atoms. With all those atoms comes the attendant space between the nuclei and the electrons. With all that space and all those atoms, what keeps us together? Is it gravity, strong or weak nuclear force or electromagnetism...?

Magic... it all ultimately boils down to magic.
(also known as the Electro-magnetic field stuff)
"He who does not know how to put his will into things at least puts a meaning into them: that is, he believes there is a will in them already."

Metaphysics:
"The science.. which deals with the fundamental errors of mankind - but as if they were the fundamental truths."
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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2/8/2011 11:30:39 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/8/2011 9:49:43 AM, theLwerd wrote:
The human body is made up of roughly 7×10 (to the 27th power) atoms. With all those atoms comes the attendant space between the nuclei and the electrons. With all that space and all those atoms, what keeps us together? Is it gravity, strong or weak nuclear force or electromagnetism...?

The strong force keeps the atoms themselves held together, and electromagnetic forces hold togother the chemcial and ionic bonds to form different molecules.

I, personally, think what is most fascinating is that you body (and everything else in this world) is about 99.99999999999949367% nothing (calculation done based on a 1 meter cube chunck of iron), empty space. And someday, we may find that mass itself, doesn't physically take up space, but is merely a force acting on keeping others out of it's bubble and so your body is nothing but energy.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
xxdarkxx
Posts: 3,090
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2/8/2011 5:43:23 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Electro-magnetic field. It's part of the reason why some people can't wear watches. Because they just break over time due to a stronger magnetic field in their body.
badger
Posts: 11,793
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2/8/2011 6:37:08 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/8/2011 5:43:23 PM, xxdarkxx wrote:
Electro-magnetic field. It's part of the reason why some people can't wear watches. Because they just break over time due to a stronger magnetic field in their body.

i thought all those fundamental forces were constant...?
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J.Kenyon
Posts: 4,194
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2/8/2011 7:00:59 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/8/2011 5:43:23 PM, xxdarkxx wrote:
Electro-magnetic field. It's part of the reason why some people can't wear watches. Because they just break over time due to a stronger magnetic field in their body.

I've never heard of that...
badger
Posts: 11,793
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2/8/2011 7:18:01 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/8/2011 7:00:59 PM, J.Kenyon wrote:
At 2/8/2011 5:43:23 PM, xxdarkxx wrote:
Electro-magnetic field. It's part of the reason why some people can't wear watches. Because they just break over time due to a stronger magnetic field in their body.

I've never heard of that...

have you ever heard of the joe dolan?
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Cliff.Stamp
Posts: 2,169
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2/8/2011 9:55:33 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/8/2011 7:00:59 PM, J.Kenyon wrote:

I've never heard of that...

I have observed it, one of my friends I could not have in my lab while I was running simulations as he would cause the computer to reset just by being around it. The rate of crashes was significant, he would make linux boxes look like they were running windows. He could also not wear a digital watch either.
Aibohphobia
Posts: 136
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2/8/2011 10:03:39 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/8/2011 9:55:33 PM, Cliff.Stamp wrote:

I have observed it, one of my friends I could not have in my lab while I was running simulations as he would cause the computer to reset just by being around it. The rate of crashes was significant, he would make linux boxes look like they were running windows. He could also not wear a digital watch either.

That's pretty awesome (though it sucks to be him.)

I agree that magic holds us together. Its so obvious.
tvellalott
Posts: 10,864
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2/9/2011 12:06:03 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/8/2011 11:07:27 AM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 2/8/2011 9:49:43 AM, theLwerd wrote:
The human body is made up of roughly 7×10 (to the 27th power) atoms. With all those atoms comes the attendant space between the nuclei and the electrons. With all that space and all those atoms, what keeps us together? Is it gravity, strong or weak nuclear force or electromagnetism...?

It's God you foolish fool!

LOL.
"Caitlyn Jenner is an incredibly brave and stunningly beautiful woman."

Muh threads
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Cliff.Stamp
Posts: 2,169
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2/9/2011 1:31:12 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/8/2011 10:03:39 PM, Aibohphobia wrote:

That's pretty awesome (though it sucks to be him.)

I was heavily into comics at the time and thought it was amusing, an odd but useful superpower to have, anti-computer man, or simply windowz, with the power to crash any system no matter how robust.
Floid
Posts: 751
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2/10/2011 7:53:59 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/9/2011 1:31:12 PM, Cliff.Stamp wrote:
At 2/8/2011 10:03:39 PM, Aibohphobia wrote:

That's pretty awesome (though it sucks to be him.)

I was heavily into comics at the time and thought it was amusing, an odd but useful superpower to have, anti-computer man, or simply windowz, with the power to crash any system no matter how robust.

I find it highly unlikely that a person emites strong enough em to disrupt electronics, much less destroy them. There are a couple of problems:

1.) You state that the watches were damaged over time. This is not how electromagnetic interference works. If a person was causing electromagnetic interference that prevented the watch from working, the watch would begin working again when you moved it away from the person. Electromagnetic interference doesn't permanently damage the device, it causes noise in the electronics such that they malfunction real time. Moving the watch away from the person would eliminate the source of noise and the watch would resume working.

2.) A strong dose of EM could cause a computer crash, however computer chassis are Faraday cages. They are designed to stop the transmission of EM . In fact, for your computer to be sold in the United States, it has to be tested to ensure it can work in the presence of EM much, much stronger than anything the body could ever produce. They do things like simulate the computer being within a mile of the very high powered radar used at airports to make sure it would still work (this is called electromagnetic susceptability testing).

A very simple test to demonstrate whether a person had a very strong EM field would be to get them to hold a compass, if the compass points towards them instead of north, then they have an EM field at least stronger than the Earths (which obviously is still way too low to interfere with electronics). Otherwise, I would have to chalk up the damaged watch to something like the person is rough on them (plays sports, drums, or something else that causes a lot of shock to the device which breaks components over time) and the computer crashing to chance or user error.
xxdarkxx
Posts: 3,090
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2/10/2011 9:07:17 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/10/2011 7:53:59 AM, Floid wrote:
At 2/9/2011 1:31:12 PM, Cliff.Stamp wrote:
At 2/8/2011 10:03:39 PM, Aibohphobia wrote:

That's pretty awesome (though it sucks to be him.)

I was heavily into comics at the time and thought it was amusing, an odd but useful superpower to have, anti-computer man, or simply windowz, with the power to crash any system no matter how robust.


I find it highly unlikely that a person emites strong enough em to disrupt electronics, much less destroy them. There are a couple of problems:

1.) You state that the watches were damaged over time. This is not how electromagnetic interference works. If a person was causing electromagnetic interference that prevented the watch from working, the watch would begin working again when you moved it away from the person. Electromagnetic interference doesn't permanently damage the device, it causes noise in the electronics such that they malfunction real time. Moving the watch away from the person would eliminate the source of noise and the watch would resume working.

2.) A strong dose of EM could cause a computer crash, however computer chassis are Faraday cages. They are designed to stop the transmission of EM . In fact, for your computer to be sold in the United States, it has to be tested to ensure it can work in the presence of EM much, much stronger than anything the body could ever produce. They do things like simulate the computer being within a mile of the very high powered radar used at airports to make sure it would still work (this is called electromagnetic susceptability testing).


A very simple test to demonstrate whether a person had a very strong EM field would be to get them to hold a compass, if the compass points towards them instead of north, then they have an EM field at least stronger than the Earths (which obviously is still way too low to interfere with electronics). Otherwise, I would have to chalk up the damaged watch to something like the person is rough on them (plays sports, drums, or something else that causes a lot of shock to the device which breaks components over time) and the computer crashing to chance or user error.

Were talking about analog watches not electronic. They have very, very tiny parts which can be shifted out of place causing the watch to not work.
Aibohphobia
Posts: 136
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2/10/2011 9:46:30 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/10/2011 7:53:59 AM, Floid wrote:
At 2/9/2011 1:31:12 PM, Cliff.Stamp wrote:
At 2/8/2011 10:03:39 PM, Aibohphobia wrote:

That's pretty awesome (though it sucks to be him.)

I was heavily into comics at the time and thought it was amusing, an odd but useful superpower to have, anti-computer man, or simply windowz, with the power to crash any system no matter how robust.


I find it highly unlikely that a person emites strong enough em to disrupt electronics, much less destroy them. There are a couple of problems:

1.) You state that the watches were damaged over time. This is not how electromagnetic interference works. If a person was causing electromagnetic interference that prevented the watch from working, the watch would begin working again when you moved it away from the person. Electromagnetic interference doesn't permanently damage the device, it causes noise in the electronics such that they malfunction real time. Moving the watch away from the person would eliminate the source of noise and the watch would resume working.

2.) A strong dose of EM could cause a computer crash, however computer chassis are Faraday cages. They are designed to stop the transmission of EM . In fact, for your computer to be sold in the United States, it has to be tested to ensure it can work in the presence of EM much, much stronger than anything the body could ever produce. They do things like simulate the computer being within a mile of the very high powered radar used at airports to make sure it would still work (this is called electromagnetic susceptability testing).


A very simple test to demonstrate whether a person had a very strong EM field would be to get them to hold a compass, if the compass points towards them instead of north, then they have an EM field at least stronger than the Earths (which obviously is still way too low to interfere with electronics). Otherwise, I would have to chalk up the damaged watch to something like the person is rough on them (plays sports, drums, or something else that causes a lot of shock to the device which breaks components over time) and the computer crashing to chance or user error.

Or maybe he's just Anti-Electronics Man! Saving mankind from the evils of the interwebs!
Floid
Posts: 751
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2/10/2011 10:10:50 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Were talking about analog watches not electronic. They have very, very tiny parts which can be shifted out of place causing the watch to not work.

That only further reinforces the idea that the failure was not related to magnetic fields. Analog watches while requiring very precise parts also have to be built to withstand the person bumping the watch into things or quickly moving their arms, so the parts are securely in place. The force exerted by a persons magnetic field would be insignificant compared to the forces the watch is made to withstand which would indicate this isn't the reason for failure.

If a small force over time would cause an analog watch to stop working, then gravity over time would cause them to cease to function because gravity is exerting a small force at all time on the internal parts of the watch.
Cliff.Stamp
Posts: 2,169
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2/10/2011 10:55:27 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/10/2011 7:53:59 AM, Floid wrote:

I find it highly unlikely that a person emites strong enough em to disrupt electronics, much less destroy them.

As did I, and the first few times it happened I assumed it was simple coincidence nothing more.

I was already keeping for my own amusement a fairly strict log of the uptime of the linux box I was using and the windows box. I compared the pattern to his presense as he used to come over there at regular intervals.

There was no denying it, using a standard t-test against the null hypothesis, the crash frequency spiked when he was there, I recall the significance value was far less than 0.1% (physical sciences usually will publish at anything less than 5%).

I also logged what they were running at the time to rule out adjacent correlation causes (i.e. his visits were correlated to first compile runs and they were causing the crashes).

1.) You state that the watches were damaged over time.

He just noted he could not wear them. He mentioned it when I commented about the linux box crashing the first time as I had never seen it blue screen before, then he gave his brief bio as Amish-Man.

2.) A strong dose of EM could cause a computer crash, however computer chassis are Faraday cages.

It used to be (not so much any more) extremely common to remove tha computer exterior casing to be able to supply coolant via fans, especially for the early over clocked CPU's which would get extremely hot.
CosmicAlfonzo
Posts: 5,955
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2/10/2011 10:57:13 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Either way, I think it would be worthwhile to run scientific tests on this guy.

With his consent... erm.. of course.. yeah...

*looks around*
Official "High Priest of Secular Affairs and Transient Distributor of Sonic Apple Seeds relating to the Reptilian Division of Paperwork Immoliation" of The FREEDO Bureaucracy, a DDO branch of the Erisian Front, a subdivision of the Discordian Back, a Limb of the Illuminatian Cosmic Utensil Corp
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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2/21/2011 3:35:32 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
The human body is held together by the strong force, which binds atomic nuclei, and by the electromagnetic force, which binds electrons to nuclei and holds molecules together. The strong force also binds quarks together to form neutrons and protons. Gluons transmit the strong force, and photons transmit the electromagnetic force. We owe a lot to gluons and photons, but they get no thanks.

Gravity is too weak to hold bodies together.

The weak force is involved in radioactive decay, not holding bodies together. Wikipedia gives a nifty summary of the weak force at work: "Since the weak interaction is both very weak and very short range, its most noticeable effect is due to its other unique feature: flavor changing. A neutron, for example, is heavier than a proton (its sister nucleon), yet it cannot decay into a proton without changing the flavor of one of its down quarks. Neither the strong interaction nor electromagnetism allow flavour changing, so this must proceed by weak decay. In this process, a down quark in the neutron would change into an up quark, emitting a boson, which eventually decays into a high-energy electron and an electron antineutrino, through beta decay." That clears it up, for sure.

I do not believe the story of the magnetic man. Mechanical watches are usually not made of iron, so they are usually not affected by magnetism. Electronic watches blink out near the large magnetic fields of an MRI machine, for example.

Did you hear about the guy who bought a watch that was waterproof, shockproof, and anti-magnetic? It caught fire. Har, har ...