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Keplar Telescope

tvellalott
Posts: 10,864
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2/11/2011 4:20:50 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
http://www.nasa.gov...

...Half-way through it's mission time.
...1200 new planets discovered.
...of which 50 are within the 'Goldilocks' zone.
...of which 5 are Earth-sized.
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tvellalott
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2/11/2011 5:37:31 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I can't believe I spelt Kepler wrong. FAIL!
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Mirza
Posts: 16,992
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2/12/2011 5:30:43 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/12/2011 5:19:39 PM, Puck wrote:
Just means creationists get to ignore another counter argument for a few decades.
Not all creationists, thank you very much.
Caramel
Posts: 855
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2/12/2011 11:41:36 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/11/2011 5:37:31 PM, tvellalott wrote:
I can't believe I spelt Kepler wrong. FAIL!

DDO is rather difficult to change isn't it.
no comment
belle
Posts: 4,113
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2/13/2011 5:50:01 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/12/2011 5:19:39 PM, Puck wrote:
Just means creationists get to ignore another counter argument for a few decades.

pffft surely it won't be decades til the rapture...
evidently i only come to ddo to avoid doing homework...
Caramel
Posts: 855
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2/15/2011 10:44:44 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/11/2011 6:01:06 PM, Aibohphobia wrote:
Very cool. Now we just need to develop a method of space travel that will get us there in a reasonable time frame....

I'm familiar with most of the arguments about why space travel would be impossible for humans, but one I wasn't aware of until recently is the amount of G-force it would take to accelerate to near-light speeds. I always figured that one could just accelerate slowly or something... But it would take years just to accelerate to ~c... The constant force against you would probably destroy you psychologically.

They talk about it here:
http://setiathome.berkeley.edu...
no comment
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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2/15/2011 11:14:55 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/15/2011 10:44:44 AM, Caramel wrote:
At 2/11/2011 6:01:06 PM, Aibohphobia wrote:
Very cool. Now we just need to develop a method of space travel that will get us there in a reasonable time frame....

I'm familiar with most of the arguments about why space travel would be impossible for humans, but one I wasn't aware of until recently is the amount of G-force it would take to accelerate to near-light speeds. I always figured that one could just accelerate slowly or something... But it would take years just to accelerate to ~c... The constant force against you would probably destroy you psychologically.

They talk about it here:
http://setiathome.berkeley.edu...

???

No it wouldn't

accelerating at a rate of 10 m/s per s (approximately the acceleration due to gravity on Earth) would take 312.5 days to reach 90% of c, and with that, we would experience normal Earth gravity (so there would not be any real psychological effects).

And given that any traveling would need to be a colony (a one way trip, so to say), the less then 1 year to accelerate would be only a small portion compared to the decades (to possibly century) long trip.
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RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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2/23/2011 8:38:05 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
The article says, "Of the 54 new planet candidates found in the habitable zone, five are near Earth-sized. The remaining 49 habitable zone candidates range from super-Earth size -- up to twice the size of Earth -- to larger than Jupiter. The findings are based on the results of observations conducted May 12 to Sept. 17, 2009 of more than 156,000 stars in Kepler's field of view, which covers approximately 1/400 of the sky."

So if there are 5 earthlike planets from 156,000 stars we can guess that there might be 3.2 million earthlike planets in the 100 billion stars of the Milky Way. There are about 100 billion galaxies, so that would imply 3 trillion earthlike planets in the universe.
PervRat
Posts: 963
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3/8/2011 3:55:06 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Is anyone else on this forum as old as I am, who went to school at a time when only nine planets were known (before Pluto was kicked out of the planetary club!) and extrasolar planets were still just a mythical theory?

Its really awesome and amazing to me that I live in a time when I remember being taught about the planets, there were only nine, and during my life, while I am an adult no less and was conscious to read the news that other planets beyond our little star system out in the boonies of our galaxy have been found. From nine planets to over 1,800 (combining Kepler's 1,200 with the 600 or so other planets discovered thus far). Some few have even been directly visually photographed, such as Fomalhaut B, which is even more astounding to me. (See http://en.wikipedia.org... for a 'map' and list of extrasolar or exoplanets detected by direct imaging)

I am such a geek!
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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3/8/2011 3:57:54 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/8/2011 3:55:06 PM, PervRat wrote:
Is anyone else on this forum as old as I am, who went to school at a time when only nine planets were known (before Pluto was kicked out of the planetary club!) and extrasolar planets were still just a mythical theory?

Its really awesome and amazing to me that I live in a time when I remember being taught about the planets, there were only nine, and during my life, while I am an adult no less and was conscious to read the news that other planets beyond our little star system out in the boonies of our galaxy have been found. From nine planets to over 1,800 (combining Kepler's 1,200 with the 600 or so other planets discovered thus far). Some few have even been directly visually photographed, such as Fomalhaut B, which is even more astounding to me. (See http://en.wikipedia.org... for a 'map' and list of extrasolar or exoplanets detected by direct imaging)

I am such a geek!

There are people as old as you here. I am not, but I was also only taught that there were 9 (even though, technically, Pluto never was a planet and if we change the definition to include pluto, we must also include Ceres).
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Ogan
Posts: 407
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3/8/2011 4:39:52 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/8/2011 3:55:06 PM, PervRat wrote:
Is anyone else on this forum as old as I am, who went to school at a time when only nine planets were known (before Pluto was kicked out of the planetary club!) and extrasolar planets were still just a mythical theory?

Its really awesome and amazing to me that I live in a time when I remember being taught about the planets, there were only nine, and during my life, while I am an adult no less and was conscious to read the news that other planets beyond our little star system out in the boonies of our galaxy have been found. From nine planets to over 1,800 (combining Kepler's 1,200 with the 600 or so other planets discovered thus far).

I remember very well in the 1950's in junior school being taught there were only 9 planets in existence and they were all in our system. Being a kid I believed it and had no reason to distrust the clever teacher. In the 1980's, I had an intense debate with an astronomer who repeated the very same truth. I however told him with absolute certainty that the existence of most, if not all stars or suns without planets either in the making, made or in the dissolution process was merely a theory and seemed to me, really illogical - as he would one day discover. You can imagine how upset he became to hear such nonsense from a 'novice' - whatever he meant by that. What I said then, I say now - science will eventually discover the obvious law of balance and that most if not all stars will be found to have planetary phenomena, some unseen at present for different reasons apart from the distance itself.
PervRat
Posts: 963
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3/8/2011 11:24:59 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/8/2011 3:57:54 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 3/8/2011 3:55:06 PM, PervRat wrote:
Is anyone else on this forum as old as I am, who went to school at a time when only nine planets were known (before Pluto was kicked out of the planetary club!) and extrasolar planets were still just a mythical theory?

Its really awesome and amazing to me that I live in a time when I remember being taught about the planets, there were only nine, and during my life, while I am an adult no less and was conscious to read the news that other planets beyond our little star system out in the boonies of our galaxy have been found. From nine planets to over 1,800 (combining Kepler's 1,200 with the 600 or so other planets discovered thus far). Some few have even been directly visually photographed, such as Fomalhaut B, which is even more astounding to me. (See http://en.wikipedia.org... for a 'map' and list of extrasolar or exoplanets detected by direct imaging)

I am such a geek!

There are people as old as you here. I am not, but I was also only taught that there were 9 (even though, technically, Pluto never was a planet and if we change the definition to include pluto, we must also include Ceres).

Au contrare, the word planet has only recently had a set of restrictions formally adopted by astronomers. The word 'planet' did not have the same restrictions it does now. Saying Pluto was never a planet is like saying someone making $2/hour in 1950 was being illegally paid under the minimum wage because that's well below the current minimum wage. When the definition of a word or category changes, that does not mean whatever no longer fits under the term didn't fit under the old definition (which was rather vague and seemed to only be a large object orbitting the star, big enough to be spheroid in shape as opposed to an asteroid).
PervRat
Posts: 963
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3/8/2011 11:27:21 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/8/2011 7:11:08 PM, THE_OPINIONATOR wrote:
Does anyone know where i can obtain one of these telescopes?

One of what telescopes?

The Kepler? Its in outer space. It cost about $600 million.
THE_OPINIONATOR
Posts: 575
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3/9/2011 3:18:47 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
yes I am aware that it is in space I'm not an imbecile! I want one hmmm wonder if the bank will loan that kind of money
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Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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3/9/2011 3:43:23 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/8/2011 11:24:59 PM, PervRat wrote:
At 3/8/2011 3:57:54 PM, OreEle wrote:
At 3/8/2011 3:55:06 PM, PervRat wrote:
Is anyone else on this forum as old as I am, who went to school at a time when only nine planets were known (before Pluto was kicked out of the planetary club!) and extrasolar planets were still just a mythical theory?

Its really awesome and amazing to me that I live in a time when I remember being taught about the planets, there were only nine, and during my life, while I am an adult no less and was conscious to read the news that other planets beyond our little star system out in the boonies of our galaxy have been found. From nine planets to over 1,800 (combining Kepler's 1,200 with the 600 or so other planets discovered thus far). Some few have even been directly visually photographed, such as Fomalhaut B, which is even more astounding to me. (See http://en.wikipedia.org... for a 'map' and list of extrasolar or exoplanets detected by direct imaging)

I am such a geek!

There are people as old as you here. I am not, but I was also only taught that there were 9 (even though, technically, Pluto never was a planet and if we change the definition to include pluto, we must also include Ceres).

Au contrare, the word planet has only recently had a set of restrictions formally adopted by astronomers. The word 'planet' did not have the same restrictions it does now. Saying Pluto was never a planet is like saying someone making $2/hour in 1950 was being illegally paid under the minimum wage because that's well below the current minimum wage. When the definition of a word or category changes, that does not mean whatever no longer fits under the term didn't fit under the old definition (which was rather vague and seemed to only be a large object orbitting the star, big enough to be spheroid in shape as opposed to an asteroid).

Pluto still was not a planet. Because we defined planets back then as seperate from asteroids and comets, in that they needed to have their own orbital path. If they were in a cluster or belt, than they were not a planet. Pulto is in a cluster or belt, however we did not know that at the time. That is why it was mis-classified.

It wasn't really a change in the definition, but the findings of new evidence that indicated that pluto was not a planet (though a clarification of the definition of the word "planet" was announced at the same time when pluto was removed, because this was also the time when we started finding other planets in other systems, so a more concise definition was needed).
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