Total Posts:17|Showing Posts:1-17
Jump to topic:

Bastille Day and More Pro-Status Quo BS!

charleslb
Posts: 4,740
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/14/2011 7:02:08 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
It's Bastille Day, the anniversary of the event that ramped up the French Revolution into a world-historical happening, so I thought I'd share some thoughts. The French Revolution is popularly portrayed to have been a popular movement, a real people's revolution. Well, the romantic idea of Jean and Jeanne Q. Publique righteously rising up to bring down the aristocratic ruling class of their society is certainly appealing and inspiring. And it's not without some truth. After all, there were plenty of blue bloods who bled out when the guillotine's blade of karmic justice came crashing down on their noble necks.

However, it was not actually the case that the French Revolution was merely a progressive peasant's putsch, an idealistic insurrection of ragtag rebels. No, I'm afraid there was a bit more to real the story. The mythologized version of the story of course does what patriotic historical mythology is designed to do, it heavily varnishes the shabby facts. In this case the shabby facts comprise a somewhat sordid tale of nouveau roturier richlings playing a bloody bit of realpolitik, of the newly-minted moneyed middle-class' murderously maneuvering & machinating for power.

That is, the celebrated crusade of the common folk for liberté, égalité, fraternité was little more than the fashionable façade and populist pretense of an on-the-rise merchant class' coup to supplant the ancienne noblesse, the old-line titled shot-callers of French society, with the lordship of lucre and the government of gelt. Alas yes, the marvelous Marseillaise-accompanied French Revolution was but a glamorized & glorified coup d'état of the bourgeoisie! And it worked, aristocracy gave way to affluentocracy, the sociopolitical status quo of capitalism, i.e. the sociopolitical status quo that we all live and suffer under today, began the process of establishing, legitimizing, and codifying itself.

But of course the social-climbing and political-carpetbagging proto-capitalists who successfully surfed the republican tsunami waves generated by the Revolution's constitutional sea change, all the way to top of a new order, could not exactly be too gauchely up front about what they were doing. No, discretion is not only the better part of valor, often it's also the better part of self-serving political ambition. Discretely decking out your class' aspiration to power in the demagogic disguise of a grassroots movement to take back the government for the homme on the street is simply the instinctively strategic tack to take.

And it was certainly the instinctive option opted for by educated bourgeoisie in the climate of democratic political thought produced by the Enlightenment – in both France and America. This was natural enough. Democracy, after all, was a quite salient dimension of the avant-garde zeitgeist brewed in the liberal brains of Montesquieu, Rousseau, Voltaire, et al, and imbibed by the intellects of the beau monde leaders who launched the revolutions of the 18th century. It was only to be expected that they would embellish and infuse their dream of becoming the new sovereigns of their society with the lofty ideals of democracy and republicanism.

Let's not be too simplistically cynical here though, these power-grabbing Jacobins and "Founding Fathers" of modern faux-democratic polities weren't quite B-movie political charlatans spouting pro-democratic rhetoric to the public and twirling their moustaches in the backrooms where they plotted how they were going to set themselves up as a new ruling class. No, their worldview was, to an extent, genuinely imbued with the thinking and values of democracy. They really couldn't help but conceptualize and interpret their personal and class agenda in flowery terms of abolishing tyranny and securing the blessings of liberty. They weren't as much conscious deceivers as they were unconscious self-deceivers. Sure, their true goal was self-empowerment, but the grooves and guidelines of their time's intellectual and political paradigm shaped their partially repressed mercenary motives into something more democratically dandified.

This being said, on the conscious level the attitudes and ambitions of the new wannabe rulers of their society weren't exactly all egalitarian sweetness & light either. The progressive values of the authors of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, and of the U.S. Constitution, certainly didn't prevent them from also entertaining and manifesting thoughts that reflected their will to power more than their commitment to creating a free political way of life. Which is simply to say that deep-down they didn't really believe in the common people and their fitness for self-government. Rather, they believed in the need of the people to be guided & governed by a benevolent elite.

Mm-hmm, in a word they, the 18th century heroes of liberty who ushered in the modern era of democratic government, were in actuality elitists. I'm going to be quite blunt politically incorrect now, they were indeed bourgeois elitists who piggybacked their play for power on the democratic movements of their day. And it paid off big-time, they were able to ideologically motivate the masses into giving their boot to the barons and lords and highnesses who stood between them and the sociopolitical ascendency they were angling for.

Further, once the Revolution's bourgeois backers had removed the ancien régime and installed their own regime, which of course became the modern regime of the rich, they proceeded to structure government and the institutions of society in such as way as to build in their own influence and advantage. Rather than bringing a system of, by, and for the people into existence, the "democratic" "revolutions" on both sides of the pond worked to place and anchor the commercial class that had orchestrated them in the political catbird seat of Western society. A place that no subsequent revolution has succeeded in dislodging them from.

At the end of the revolutionary day then, i.e. the day spent cutting off the heads of members of the outgoing hierarchy, French democracy, just like the American brand, was, for all practical purposes, reduced to being a sham vehicle for the realization of a plutocratic-capitalist power structure. But this profoundly undemocratic power structure, which of course is still very much alive and in place, and the profoundly undemocratic capitalists who helm it, can't very well own such truth, for that would call the very legitimacy of the whole capitalist order into serious question and threaten its continuation. So, instead, the business-governmental-media complex that has such a patently vested interest in protecting the fundamental politico-economic command & control structure of society makes sure that we're taught a highly edited version of history.

You know, a version edited to make us more accepting and respectful of government, of the establishment, of the powers that be. Yes sirree, the real function of the history that we're indoctrinated with as schoolchildren is to program us with an opiate-of-the-people sort of patriotism, one that would have us unquestioningly take our far-from-authentically-democratic societal food chain to be the natural order of things. Well, imprinting us to believe that our nation's political tradition was founded by sincere and chivalrous champions of representative government and civil rights certainly does go a rather long way in validating it, and in immunizing it from criticism, dissent, and another, more truly populist, revolution.

The conclusion is located directly below
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/14/2011 7:02:40 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Conclusion

Merely gently, if skeptically, scratch the specious and sanctimonious surface of our historical democratic bona fides and moral superiority and what you chagriningly find is a socioeconomically stratified society whose elitist leaders routinely violate their purported mandate to uphold the democratic precepts fictionally handed down to us from our mythologized revolution. In other, plainer words, lies, lies, lies. Holidays such as Bastille Day are just special occasions to once more, and a bit deeper, plant the lies in our naïvely receptive heads.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/15/2011 12:46:22 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Do you have any examples of bourgeois who became leaders? Most of the main leaders of the revolution were beheaded during the reign of terror.
MarquisX
Posts: 925
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/15/2011 12:46:39 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Seriously dude. We know you are all powerful and a genius. However simple folk like myself, don't nearly have the attention span to read your essasys. Must be all the meth we do. You would be much more effective if you kept it short and got right to the point.
Sophisticated ignorance, write my curses in cursive
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/15/2011 1:44:08 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/15/2011 12:46:39 AM, MarquisX wrote:
Seriously dude. We know you are all powerful and a genius. However simple folk like myself, don't nearly have the attention span to read your essasys. Must be all the meth we do. You would be much more effective if you kept it short and got right to the point.

Or wrote a BOOK.
MarquisX
Posts: 925
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/15/2011 7:20:15 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/15/2011 1:44:08 AM, Rockylightning wrote:
At 7/15/2011 12:46:39 AM, MarquisX wrote:
Seriously dude. We know you are all powerful and a genius. However simple folk like myself, don't nearly have the attention span to read your essasys. Must be all the meth we do. You would be much more effective if you kept it short and got right to the point.

Or wrote a BOOK.
Overkill. It would make "War and Peace" look like "Green eggs and Ham"by comparison
Sophisticated ignorance, write my curses in cursive
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/15/2011 1:25:41 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/15/2011 12:46:39 AM, MarquisX wrote:
... folk like myself, don't nearly have the attention span to read your essasys...

Finally, a critic who honestly, if only semi-seriously, acknowledges that he's attention span-challenged!
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/15/2011 1:31:04 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/15/2011 1:25:41 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 7/15/2011 12:46:39 AM, MarquisX wrote:
... folk like myself, don't nearly have the attention span to read your essasys...

Finally, a critic who honestly, if only semi-seriously, acknowledges that he's attention span-challenged!

The problem is that if someone actually bothers to read and has a sensible reply they get ignored. You are just a very long winded troll.
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
mongeese
Posts: 5,387
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/15/2011 2:17:26 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/15/2011 1:31:04 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 7/15/2011 1:25:41 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 7/15/2011 12:46:39 AM, MarquisX wrote:
... folk like myself, don't nearly have the attention span to read your essasys...

Finally, a critic who honestly, if only semi-seriously, acknowledges that he's attention span-challenged!

The problem is that if someone actually bothers to read and has a sensible reply they get ignored. You are just a very long winded troll.

Actually, I'll vouch for the fact that he will, in time, respond to your replies, although if you dismiss his first post as a rant, you'd probably feel the same way about his responses.
Rockylightning
Posts: 2,862
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/15/2011 2:32:02 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/15/2011 1:25:41 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 7/15/2011 12:46:39 AM, MarquisX wrote:
... folk like myself, don't nearly have the attention span to read your essasys...

Finally, a critic who honestly, if only semi-seriously, acknowledges that he's attention span-challenged!

I'm waiting for a reply.
MarquisX
Posts: 925
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/15/2011 9:21:48 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/15/2011 1:31:04 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 7/15/2011 1:25:41 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 7/15/2011 12:46:39 AM, MarquisX wrote:
... folk like myself, don't nearly have the attention span to read your essasys...

Finally, a critic who honestly, if only semi-seriously, acknowledges that he's attention span-challenged!

The problem is that if someone actually bothers to read and has a sensible reply they get ignored. You are just a very long winded troll.
Maybe it just takes him days to write his reply.
Sophisticated ignorance, write my curses in cursive
MarquisX
Posts: 925
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/15/2011 9:23:10 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I got quick responses out of him by calling him a vagina once. Not suggesting you do the same but it is effective
Sophisticated ignorance, write my curses in cursive
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/16/2011 2:22:08 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/15/2011 9:23:10 PM, MarquisX wrote:
I got quick responses out of him by calling him a vagina once. Not suggesting you do the same but it is effective

Sounds like a plan, in the meantime we should just use this thread for random waffle.
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/16/2011 8:36:52 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/15/2011 2:17:26 PM, mongeese wrote:
At 7/15/2011 1:31:04 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 7/15/2011 1:25:41 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 7/15/2011 12:46:39 AM, MarquisX wrote:
... folk like myself, don't nearly have the attention span to read your essasys...

Finally, a critic who honestly, if only semi-seriously, acknowledges that he's attention span-challenged!

The problem is that if someone actually bothers to read and has a sensible reply they get ignored. You are just a very long winded troll.

Actually, I'll vouch for the fact that he will, in time, respond to your replies, although if you dismiss his first post as a rant, you'd probably feel the same way about his responses.

Thanks for the backhanded and begrudging support, mongeese. I suppose that when it comes to receiving support from anyone at this site I'll have to take and treasure the precious little morsels of it that I occasionally get.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/16/2011 9:08:45 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/15/2011 12:46:22 AM, Rockylightning wrote:
Do you have any examples of bourgeois who became leaders? Most of the main leaders of the revolution were beheaded during the reign of terror.

Let's see, there were the individuals who made up the National Convention; there were the Girondins and the Jacobins, who were mostly bourgeois; then there was perhaps the most famous, or infamous bourgeoisie leader of the Revolution, Maximilien Robespierre, who's usually described as a "left-wing bourgeoisie"; other random bourgeoisie include Jean-Paul Marat, Jacques Hébert, Jacques Nicolas Billaud-Varenne. One could go on, but what's the point, the leadership of the Revolution was obviously dominated by the bourgeoisie, do you seriously dispute this?
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
mongeese
Posts: 5,387
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/16/2011 9:10:26 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 7/16/2011 8:36:52 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 7/15/2011 2:17:26 PM, mongeese wrote:
At 7/15/2011 1:31:04 PM, Cerebral_Narcissist wrote:
At 7/15/2011 1:25:41 PM, charleslb wrote:
At 7/15/2011 12:46:39 AM, MarquisX wrote:
... folk like myself, don't nearly have the attention span to read your essasys...

Finally, a critic who honestly, if only semi-seriously, acknowledges that he's attention span-challenged!

The problem is that if someone actually bothers to read and has a sensible reply they get ignored. You are just a very long winded troll.

Actually, I'll vouch for the fact that he will, in time, respond to your replies, although if you dismiss his first post as a rant, you'd probably feel the same way about his responses.

Thanks for the backhanded and begrudging support, mongeese. I suppose that when it comes to receiving support from anyone at this site I'll have to take and treasure the precious little morsels of it that I occasionally get.

Note that I don't regard your posts as rants. Sure, I think you're wrong on numerous levels, but I'll just debate you rather than ignore you. I only mentioned rants because I figured that it was C_N's view, not my own.