Total Posts:36|Showing Posts:1-30|Last Page
Jump to topic:

Facebook during work: gain or drain?

evelin2011
Posts: 2
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/4/2013 8:11:57 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Shopping online and checking your Facebook account during the worktime? Does it sound familiar to you?

Probably most of us are doing it at some point but we tend to keep it undetected because it just doesn"t feel right. Cyberloafing comprises basically all online activities at the workplace that are not for work purpose. According to a study conducted by Websense.com, an average American employee spends 24% of his/her working hours on leisure online activities! Traditionally cyberloafing is seen as a waste of valuable work time and productivity which is the reason why most employers discourage or even ban it.
However, lately several surveys prove the opposite is true: cyberloafing can have positive emotional effect on employees by providing them with relaxation and necessary time out. Browsing your favourite website or checking your friend"s status update on Facebook can at the end raise your work productivity, they claim.

I am interested in what you think :) Should employers discourage online leisure activities during the worktime or the opposite, should they accept it and even cherish it as an easy and cheap way to reduce our stress that the work is causing us?
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/4/2013 8:14:44 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
You shouldn't be paid for something that is not your job.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/4/2013 9:45:41 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/4/2013 8:11:57 AM, evelin2011 wrote:
Shopping online and checking your Facebook account during the worktime? Does it sound familiar to you?

Probably most of us are doing it at some point but we tend to keep it undetected because it just doesn"t feel right. Cyberloafing comprises basically all online activities at the workplace that are not for work purpose. According to a study conducted by Websense.com, an average American employee spends 24% of his/her working hours on leisure online activities! Traditionally cyberloafing is seen as a waste of valuable work time and productivity which is the reason why most employers discourage or even ban it.
However, lately several surveys prove the opposite is true: cyberloafing can have positive emotional effect on employees by providing them with relaxation and necessary time out. Browsing your favourite website or checking your friend"s status update on Facebook can at the end raise your work productivity, they claim.

I am interested in what you think :) Should employers discourage online leisure activities during the worktime or the opposite, should they accept it and even cherish it as an easy and cheap way to reduce our stress that the work is causing us?

I think it's been scientifically established that you need breaks throughout the day to function well.

However, I've seen people get fired for using FB too much.

The whole alt-tab-before-the-manager-comes just makes you look more guilty. My solution is to use a text-based browser. They don't work with FB but I would rather be using DDO anyway. Got to go I think the boss is coming
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
ConservativeAmerican
Posts: 1,676
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/4/2013 2:55:42 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/4/2013 8:11:57 AM, evelin2011 wrote:
Shopping online and checking your Facebook account during the worktime? Does it sound familiar to you?

Probably most of us are doing it at some point but we tend to keep it undetected because it just doesn"t feel right. Cyberloafing comprises basically all online activities at the workplace that are not for work purpose. According to a study conducted by Websense.com, an average American employee spends 24% of his/her working hours on leisure online activities! Traditionally cyberloafing is seen as a waste of valuable work time and productivity which is the reason why most employers discourage or even ban it.
However, lately several surveys prove the opposite is true: cyberloafing can have positive emotional effect on employees by providing them with relaxation and necessary time out. Browsing your favourite website or checking your friend"s status update on Facebook can at the end raise your work productivity, they claim.

I am interested in what you think :) Should employers discourage online leisure activities during the worktime or the opposite, should they accept it and even cherish it as an easy and cheap way to reduce our stress that the work is causing us?

I agree with periodic breaks throughout the day, (maybe 5 mins per hour), but 24% of your time is absurd. If you make 30 bucks an hour (my income), and work 10 hours a day, if you loaf 24% of the time on the computer, I am essentially taking 72 dollars daily from my employer. It is even worse if you are supposed to be doing a job/are assigned a job. If you are not you shouldn't lie about when you are done, you should turn in your work and get a new assignment. Your employer is trusting that when you go there, you are being paid to work, for every hour you work, you should be paid the promised amount in your contract, but if you only work 45 minutes out of every hour (100%-24%=.76x60), then you are cheating your employer out of time and money.
sadolite
Posts: 8,838
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/4/2013 6:02:35 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
The day has finaly come. Being a slacker is good for business.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
Wnope
Posts: 6,924
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/4/2013 11:58:01 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/4/2013 8:11:57 AM, evelin2011 wrote:
Shopping online and checking your Facebook account during the worktime? Does it sound familiar to you?

Probably most of us are doing it at some point but we tend to keep it undetected because it just doesn"t feel right. Cyberloafing comprises basically all online activities at the workplace that are not for work purpose. According to a study conducted by Websense.com, an average American employee spends 24% of his/her working hours on leisure online activities! Traditionally cyberloafing is seen as a waste of valuable work time and productivity which is the reason why most employers discourage or even ban it.
However, lately several surveys prove the opposite is true: cyberloafing can have positive emotional effect on employees by providing them with relaxation and necessary time out. Browsing your favourite website or checking your friend"s status update on Facebook can at the end raise your work productivity, they claim.

I am interested in what you think :) Should employers discourage online leisure activities during the worktime or the opposite, should they accept it and even cherish it as an easy and cheap way to reduce our stress that the work is causing us?

Depends on how much time they actually spend.

http://www.inquisitr.com...
tulle
Posts: 4,445
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:10:23 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/4/2013 8:14:44 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
You shouldn't be paid for something that is not your job.

Even at McDonald's you have other coworkers to talk with and joke around with. Sometimes you may be standing around or goofing off, sometimes you're wiping a counter for no reason just to look busy. You're not getting paid to do any of that.
yang.
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:11:56 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:10:23 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/4/2013 8:14:44 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
You shouldn't be paid for something that is not your job.

Even at McDonald's you have other coworkers to talk with and joke around with. Sometimes you may be standing around or goofing off, sometimes you're wiping a counter for no reason just to look busy. You're not getting paid to do any of that.

And you shouldn't be doing that.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
tulle
Posts: 4,445
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:19:38 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:11:56 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

And you shouldn't be doing that.

Then what DO you do during down-time?? :/ You can't always be doing something. Not only is it impossible (you can't force people to come to McDonald's... sometimes there will be no customers and sometimes you will have nothing left to do) but it is also mentally draining. And if you work at a job where you have Internet access, it's probably better for the employer if your brain isn't constantly thinking about work. It doesn't help anyone if you have a 9-5 shift and your brain clocks out at 3.
yang.
Oryus
Posts: 8,280
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:20:47 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:11:56 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:10:23 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/4/2013 8:14:44 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
You shouldn't be paid for something that is not your job.

Even at McDonald's you have other coworkers to talk with and joke around with. Sometimes you may be standing around or goofing off, sometimes you're wiping a counter for no reason just to look busy. You're not getting paid to do any of that.

And you shouldn't be doing that.

http://www.nbc.com...

Makin' copaaaayyyys.
: : :Tulle: The fool, I purposely don't engage with you because you don't have proper command of the English language.
: :
: : The Fool: It's my English writing. Either way It's okay have a larger vocabulary then you, and a better grasp of language, and you're a woman.
:
: I'm just going to leave this precious struggle nugget right here.
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:21:00 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:19:38 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:11:56 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

And you shouldn't be doing that.

Then what DO you do during down-time?? :/ You can't always be doing something. Not only is it impossible (you can't force people to come to McDonald's... sometimes there will be no customers and sometimes you will have nothing left to do) but it is also mentally draining. And if you work at a job where you have Internet access, it's probably better for the employer if your brain isn't constantly thinking about work. It doesn't help anyone if you have a 9-5 shift and your brain clocks out at 3.

Then the employee should say that that's allowed. If they say that you can't do that, you CAN'T DO THAT. You accept their terms.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
Oryus
Posts: 8,280
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:23:58 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:21:00 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:19:38 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:11:56 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

And you shouldn't be doing that.

Then what DO you do during down-time?? :/ You can't always be doing something. Not only is it impossible (you can't force people to come to McDonald's... sometimes there will be no customers and sometimes you will have nothing left to do) but it is also mentally draining. And if you work at a job where you have Internet access, it's probably better for the employer if your brain isn't constantly thinking about work. It doesn't help anyone if you have a 9-5 shift and your brain clocks out at 3.

Then the employee should say that that's allowed. If they say that you can't do that, you CAN'T DO THAT. You accept their terms.

hhahaha

Good luck to them enforcing that.
: : :Tulle: The fool, I purposely don't engage with you because you don't have proper command of the English language.
: :
: : The Fool: It's my English writing. Either way It's okay have a larger vocabulary then you, and a better grasp of language, and you're a woman.
:
: I'm just going to leave this precious struggle nugget right here.
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:25:12 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:23:58 AM, Oryus wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:21:00 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:19:38 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:11:56 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

And you shouldn't be doing that.

Then what DO you do during down-time?? :/ You can't always be doing something. Not only is it impossible (you can't force people to come to McDonald's... sometimes there will be no customers and sometimes you will have nothing left to do) but it is also mentally draining. And if you work at a job where you have Internet access, it's probably better for the employer if your brain isn't constantly thinking about work. It doesn't help anyone if you have a 9-5 shift and your brain clocks out at 3.

Then the employee should say that that's allowed. If they say that you can't do that, you CAN'T DO THAT. You accept their terms.

hhahaha

Good luck to them enforcing that.

They can and should enforce their rules.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
tulle
Posts: 4,445
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:26:44 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:25:12 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

They can and should enforce their rules.

There's a reason Taylorism didn't work... people are not machines. In fact, if you treat them as such, they will start sabotaging to get a break (like jamming the machines by-accident-on-purpose)
yang.
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:28:36 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:26:44 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:25:12 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

They can and should enforce their rules.

There's a reason Taylorism didn't work... people are not machines. In fact, if you treat them as such, they will start sabotaging to get a break (like jamming the machines by-accident-on-purpose)

I never said that those rules should be in place.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
tulle
Posts: 4,445
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:33:25 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:28:36 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:26:44 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:25:12 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

They can and should enforce their rules.

There's a reason Taylorism didn't work... people are not machines. In fact, if you treat them as such, they will start sabotaging to get a break (like jamming the machines by-accident-on-purpose)

I never said that those rules should be in place.

At 3/4/2013 8:14:44 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
You shouldn't be paid for something that is not your job.
yang.
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:35:01 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:33:25 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:28:36 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:26:44 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:25:12 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

They can and should enforce their rules.

There's a reason Taylorism didn't work... people are not machines. In fact, if you treat them as such, they will start sabotaging to get a break (like jamming the machines by-accident-on-purpose)

I never said that those rules should be in place.

At 3/4/2013 8:14:44 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
You shouldn't be paid for something that is not your job.

Except the rules are already in place...
I advocate putting things like cybersurfing in the job description in the first place. What I do not advocate is breaking the current rules.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
tulle
Posts: 4,445
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:39:15 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:35:01 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

Except the rules are already in place...
I advocate putting things like cybersurfing in the job description in the first place. What I do not advocate is breaking the current rules.

lol but cybersurfing is not part of the job description. There are plenty of things you do while working that are not part of the job description, that doesn't mean you shouldn't do them.

You can't put everything you would do in your job description, nor can you put everything you can not do. Some things are just implied or common sense. Do you think that "Standing around chatting" should be in a McDonald's employee's job description? And if they can't do that, what should they do if there are no customers, nothing to clean, and nothing to do?
yang.
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:41:52 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:39:15 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:35:01 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

Except the rules are already in place...
I advocate putting things like cybersurfing in the job description in the first place. What I do not advocate is breaking the current rules.

lol but cybersurfing is not part of the job description. There are plenty of things you do while working that are not part of the job description, that doesn't mean you shouldn't do them.

You can't put everything you would do in your job description, nor can you put everything you can not do. Some things are just implied or common sense. Do you think that "Standing around chatting" should be in a McDonald's employee's job description? And if they can't do that, what should they do if there are no customers, nothing to clean, and nothing to do?

There's only so many things that they can do. Read, use their phones, listen to music. I can't think of much more that doesn't involve leaving their post.

Also, blanket statements ensure that you don't have to list everything.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 12:42:59 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
To clarify, by "job" I mean whatever the company says you can do while doing your "job".
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
Cody_Franklin
Posts: 9,483
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 1:08:00 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Lol. I work at a sandwich store for $8.00 an hour. I don't care whether they want me to stay busy the entire shift--they can fuck off. Anyone who has actually worked a menial, mind-numbing job for any period of time knows what I mean, and anyone who knows how to run a business understands the need to accept discrepancies between stated rules and actual conduct. There's a good reason that no one operates by-the-book.
Oryus
Posts: 8,280
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/5/2013 1:19:24 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Cody Franklin knows what's up.

Seriously though, businesses have an incentive to also RETAIN employees. A business with a manager who is constantly breathing down the necks of it's employees, telling them they can't spend a spare moment being themselves instead of a meat-bag machine who operates only for the company's purposes.... well, they're going to have a pretty damn high turnover rate.

You have to weigh the pros and cons. Will being such a harda$$ ACTUALLY save the company money? Or will it merely alienate and disgruntle employees, cause high turnover, more stealing, less company loyalty, and more money spent training new employees?

Probably the latter. Sometimes you gotta let the kids play in their food for a while so they'll just shut the hell up for a minute. You know? Choose your battles.
: : :Tulle: The fool, I purposely don't engage with you because you don't have proper command of the English language.
: :
: : The Fool: It's my English writing. Either way It's okay have a larger vocabulary then you, and a better grasp of language, and you're a woman.
:
: I'm just going to leave this precious struggle nugget right here.
evelin2011
Posts: 2
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/6/2013 4:00:28 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:39:15 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:35:01 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

Except the rules are already in place...
I advocate putting things like cybersurfing in the job description in the first place. What I do not advocate is breaking the current rules.

lol but cybersurfing is not part of the job description. There are plenty of things you do while working that are not part of the job description, that doesn't mean you shouldn't do them.

You can't put everything you would do in your job description, nor can you put everything you can not do. Some things are just implied or common sense. Do you think that "Standing around chatting" should be in a McDonald's employee's job description? And if they can't do that, what should they do if there are no customers, nothing to clean, and nothing to do?

I agree that you cannot put every single activity in job description, especially not such a sensitive and implicit topic like cyberloafing. Employers not employees generally don't like to talk about it although everyone knows that most of us are doing it, whether secretly or not.

So, to answer my debate question, which approach should employers take? Should they explicitly ban it and punish people caught on Facebook or should they stay neutral by accepting it and not paying much attention on what employees are doing behind their desks? If you were a manager, which approach would you take?
sadolite
Posts: 8,838
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/7/2013 5:57:40 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:42:59 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
To clarify, by "job" I mean whatever the company says you can do while doing your "job".

I never ask what to do. You usally get assigned busy work if you have to ask. I could work for 6 months before I would run out of work if i didn't do anything that pertains to my primary job description in those 6 months. There is always something to do and something that needs to be done. There is no such thing as "down time" at least any place I ever worked.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/7/2013 6:01:19 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/5/2013 12:23:58 AM, Oryus wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:21:00 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:19:38 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:11:56 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

And you shouldn't be doing that.

Then what DO you do during down-time?? :/ You can't always be doing something. Not only is it impossible (you can't force people to come to McDonald's... sometimes there will be no customers and sometimes you will have nothing left to do) but it is also mentally draining. And if you work at a job where you have Internet access, it's probably better for the employer if your brain isn't constantly thinking about work. It doesn't help anyone if you have a 9-5 shift and your brain clocks out at 3.

Then the employee should say that that's allowed. If they say that you can't do that, you CAN'T DO THAT. You accept their terms.

hhahaha

Good luck to them enforcing that.

soldiers are super disciplined during boot camp. Can't explain that.
Open borders debate:
http://www.debate.org...
sadolite
Posts: 8,838
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/7/2013 6:01:27 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/7/2013 5:57:40 PM, sadolite wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:42:59 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
To clarify, by "job" I mean whatever the company says you can do while doing your "job".

I never ask what to do. You usally get assigned busy work if you have to ask. I could work for 6 months before I would run out of work if i didn't do anything that pertains to my primary job description in those 6 months. There is always something to do and something that needs to be done. There is no such thing as "down time" at least any place I ever worked.

Only the "do the bear minimum to not get fired slacker" has "down time"
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/7/2013 6:02:41 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/7/2013 6:01:19 PM, darkkermit wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:23:58 AM, Oryus wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:21:00 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:19:38 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:11:56 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

And you shouldn't be doing that.

Then what DO you do during down-time?? :/ You can't always be doing something. Not only is it impossible (you can't force people to come to McDonald's... sometimes there will be no customers and sometimes you will have nothing left to do) but it is also mentally draining. And if you work at a job where you have Internet access, it's probably better for the employer if your brain isn't constantly thinking about work. It doesn't help anyone if you have a 9-5 shift and your brain clocks out at 3.

Then the employee should say that that's allowed. If they say that you can't do that, you CAN'T DO THAT. You accept their terms.

hhahaha

Good luck to them enforcing that.

soldiers are super disciplined during boot camp. Can't explain that.

Well I suppose there's no honor in working at McDonald's.
Open borders debate:
http://www.debate.org...
Oryus
Posts: 8,280
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/7/2013 7:00:46 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/7/2013 6:01:19 PM, darkkermit wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:23:58 AM, Oryus wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:21:00 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:19:38 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:11:56 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

And you shouldn't be doing that.

Then what DO you do during down-time?? :/ You can't always be doing something. Not only is it impossible (you can't force people to come to McDonald's... sometimes there will be no customers and sometimes you will have nothing left to do) but it is also mentally draining. And if you work at a job where you have Internet access, it's probably better for the employer if your brain isn't constantly thinking about work. It doesn't help anyone if you have a 9-5 shift and your brain clocks out at 3.

Then the employee should say that that's allowed. If they say that you can't do that, you CAN'T DO THAT. You accept their terms.

hhahaha

Good luck to them enforcing that.

soldiers are super disciplined during boot camp. Can't explain that.

lol

I think we can explain that. :P
: : :Tulle: The fool, I purposely don't engage with you because you don't have proper command of the English language.
: :
: : The Fool: It's my English writing. Either way It's okay have a larger vocabulary then you, and a better grasp of language, and you're a woman.
:
: I'm just going to leave this precious struggle nugget right here.
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/7/2013 7:04:17 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/6/2013 4:00:28 AM, evelin2011 wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:39:15 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:35:01 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

Except the rules are already in place...
I advocate putting things like cybersurfing in the job description in the first place. What I do not advocate is breaking the current rules.

lol but cybersurfing is not part of the job description. There are plenty of things you do while working that are not part of the job description, that doesn't mean you shouldn't do them.

You can't put everything you would do in your job description, nor can you put everything you can not do. Some things are just implied or common sense. Do you think that "Standing around chatting" should be in a McDonald's employee's job description? And if they can't do that, what should they do if there are no customers, nothing to clean, and nothing to do?

I agree that you cannot put every single activity in job description, especially not such a sensitive and implicit topic like cyberloafing. Employers not employees generally don't like to talk about it although everyone knows that most of us are doing it, whether secretly or not.
As I was saying, blanket statements can cover a lot.

So, to answer my debate question, which approach should employers take? Should they explicitly ban it and punish people caught on Facebook or should they stay neutral by accepting it and not paying much attention on what employees are doing behind their desks? If you were a manager, which approach would you take?

Approve of it.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
Oryus
Posts: 8,280
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/14/2013 1:20:31 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/7/2013 7:04:17 PM, bossyburrito wrote:
At 3/6/2013 4:00:28 AM, evelin2011 wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:39:15 AM, tulle wrote:
At 3/5/2013 12:35:01 AM, bossyburrito wrote:

Except the rules are already in place...
I advocate putting things like cybersurfing in the job description in the first place. What I do not advocate is breaking the current rules.

lol but cybersurfing is not part of the job description. There are plenty of things you do while working that are not part of the job description, that doesn't mean you shouldn't do them.

You can't put everything you would do in your job description, nor can you put everything you can not do. Some things are just implied or common sense. Do you think that "Standing around chatting" should be in a McDonald's employee's job description? And if they can't do that, what should they do if there are no customers, nothing to clean, and nothing to do?

I agree that you cannot put every single activity in job description, especially not such a sensitive and implicit topic like cyberloafing. Employers not employees generally don't like to talk about it although everyone knows that most of us are doing it, whether secretly or not.
As I was saying, blanket statements can cover a lot.

So, to answer my debate question, which approach should employers take? Should they explicitly ban it and punish people caught on Facebook or should they stay neutral by accepting it and not paying much attention on what employees are doing behind their desks? If you were a manager, which approach would you take?

Approve of it.

So.... you changed your mind then? Did I miss something?
: : :Tulle: The fool, I purposely don't engage with you because you don't have proper command of the English language.
: :
: : The Fool: It's my English writing. Either way It's okay have a larger vocabulary then you, and a better grasp of language, and you're a woman.
:
: I'm just going to leave this precious struggle nugget right here.