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Your Thoughts On White Privilege

psychout
Posts: 9
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10/4/2013 4:11:02 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
White Privilege is all around us. I'm white, and it's easy to think nothing of it. But how do others feel about this? Is it possible that as a society we can retract such a notion? And how did it even occur in the first place?
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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10/4/2013 5:03:29 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/4/2013 4:11:02 PM, psychout wrote:
White Privilege is all around us. I'm white, and it's easy to think nothing of it. But how do others feel about this?

Frankly, I don't see how its much more than race-based jealousy, used to discredit white critics.
Just because someone is white, doesn't mean they caught all the breaks in life. I deliver pizza, and I see numerous minorities appearing to have a better lot in life than me.

I have seen more false claims of racism from minorities than I have real ones, which leads me to believe this white privilege has a similar track record.

Is it possible that as a society we can retract such a notion?
Of course, we can. Just like we can overlook racism at every corner, and we can look over that as easily as all other disparities, like wealth and job-type.

The fact is, being aware of the privilege is enough to combat it, just like being born rich is enough to combat one's inability to empathize with the poor.

The issue lies with others citing it as evidence to dismiss one's opinion. Ironically, it is equally racist to do, IMO.

And how did it even occur in the first place?
Probably by stepping on others (slaves, legal discriminations, etc.)
My work here is, finally, done.
psychout
Posts: 9
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10/4/2013 6:43:19 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/4/2013 5:03:29 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
Frankly, I don't see how its much more than race-based jealousy, used to discredit white critics.
Just because someone is white, doesn't mean they caught all the breaks in life. I deliver pizza, and I see numerous minorities appearing to have a better lot in life than me.
I have seen more false claims of racism from minorities than I have real ones, which leads me to believe this white privilege has a similar track record.

Well I agree, of course just if your white does not mean you're living large or even any better than minorities. Yet, is it likely that a white person will be worried about delivering pizza to a neighborhood known to be full of other white people rather than people of a minority? Can you deliver a pizza wearing clothes with holes in them and baggy pants, without people assuming that because you are a certain race you must be poor instead of just lazy today? I do think minorities suffer many more stereotypes than white people, and that is unfair.
Df0512
Posts: 966
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10/4/2013 11:36:16 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/4/2013 5:03:29 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 10/4/2013 4:11:02 PM, psychout wrote:
White Privilege is all around us. I'm white, and it's easy to think nothing of it. But how do others feel about this?

Frankly, I don't see how its much more than race-based jealousy, used to discredit white critics.
Just because someone is white, doesn't mean they caught all the breaks in life. I deliver pizza, and I see numerous minorities appearing to have a better lot in life than me.

I have seen more false claims of racism from minorities than I have real ones, which leads me to believe this white privilege has a similar track record.

Is it possible that as a society we can retract such a notion?
Of course, we can. Just like we can overlook racism at every corner, and we can look over that as easily as all other disparities, like wealth and job-type.

The fact is, being aware of the privilege is enough to combat it, just like being born rich is enough to combat one's inability to empathize with the poor.

The issue lies with others citing it as evidence to dismiss one's opinion. Ironically, it is equally racist to do, IMO.

And how did it even occur in the first place?
Probably by stepping on others (slaves, legal discriminations, etc.)

I have never been one to use race as leverage, because it isn't an excuse for failure. But "race-based jealousy", I greatly disagree with this. The color of your skin can be an obstacle in the country. It is a real and present thing. I wouldn't describe the issue as white privilege but calling it race-based jealousy is a gross understatement.
Jack212
Posts: 572
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10/5/2013 1:22:55 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/4/2013 4:11:02 PM, psychout wrote:
White Privilege is all around us. I'm white, and it's easy to think nothing of it. But how do others feel about this? Is it possible that as a society we can retract such a notion? And how did it even occur in the first place?

Race-/gender-politics is bullshiit.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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10/5/2013 2:58:57 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/4/2013 11:36:16 PM, Df0512 wrote:
At 10/4/2013 5:03:29 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 10/4/2013 4:11:02 PM, psychout wrote:
White Privilege is all around us. I'm white, and it's easy to think nothing of it. But how do others feel about this?

Frankly, I don't see how its much more than race-based jealousy, used to discredit white critics.
Just because someone is white, doesn't mean they caught all the breaks in life. I deliver pizza, and I see numerous minorities appearing to have a better lot in life than me.

I have seen more false claims of racism from minorities than I have real ones, which leads me to believe this white privilege has a similar track record.

Is it possible that as a society we can retract such a notion?
Of course, we can. Just like we can overlook racism at every corner, and we can look over that as easily as all other disparities, like wealth and job-type.

The fact is, being aware of the privilege is enough to combat it, just like being born rich is enough to combat one's inability to empathize with the poor.

The issue lies with others citing it as evidence to dismiss one's opinion. Ironically, it is equally racist to do, IMO.

And how did it even occur in the first place?
Probably by stepping on others (slaves, legal discriminations, etc.)

I have never been one to use race as leverage, because it isn't an excuse for failure. But "race-based jealousy", I greatly disagree with this. The color of your skin can be an obstacle in the country. It is a real and present thing. I wouldn't describe the issue as white privilege but calling it race-based jealousy is a gross understatement.

What I mean by this is it is a way for minorities (or whites) to excuse/justify their success, similar to affirmative action. Did he get the job because he's the most qualified, or because of his race?

I am merely saying that I think "white privilege" is more or less a way to hate whites and dismiss them as individuals. The reason is jealosy, just like affirmative action is jealousy. It could be privilege (or affirmative action), or it could be because that person is otherwise deserving of their success and/or stature in the community.
My work here is, finally, done.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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10/5/2013 3:02:49 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/4/2013 6:43:19 PM, psychout wrote:
At 10/4/2013 5:03:29 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
Frankly, I don't see how its much more than race-based jealousy, used to discredit white critics.
Just because someone is white, doesn't mean they caught all the breaks in life. I deliver pizza, and I see numerous minorities appearing to have a better lot in life than me.
I have seen more false claims of racism from minorities than I have real ones, which leads me to believe this white privilege has a similar track record.

Well I agree, of course just if your white does not mean you're living large or even any better than minorities. Yet, is it likely that a white person will be worried about delivering pizza to a neighborhood known to be full of other white people rather than people of a minority? Can you deliver a pizza wearing clothes with holes in them and baggy pants, without people assuming that because you are a certain race you must be poor instead of just lazy today? I do think minorities suffer many more stereotypes than white people, and that is unfair.

It is unfair, but stereotypes do have a grain of truth to them.
If I see a black man with baggy pants and a bandana, should I be nervous? Perhaps not.
However, if you see a successful white man, is he successful because he is white? Is he not hassled by the police because he is white? Did he get the job, because he is white?

These are also stereotypes.
My work here is, finally, done.
Df0512
Posts: 966
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10/5/2013 8:25:43 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/5/2013 2:58:57 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 10/4/2013 11:36:16 PM, Df0512 wrote:
At 10/4/2013 5:03:29 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 10/4/2013 4:11:02 PM, psychout wrote:
White Privilege is all around us. I'm white, and it's easy to think nothing of it. But how do others feel about this?

Frankly, I don't see how its much more than race-based jealousy, used to discredit white critics.
Just because someone is white, doesn't mean they caught all the breaks in life. I deliver pizza, and I see numerous minorities appearing to have a better lot in life than me.

I have seen more false claims of racism from minorities than I have real ones, which leads me to believe this white privilege has a similar track record.

Is it possible that as a society we can retract such a notion?
Of course, we can. Just like we can overlook racism at every corner, and we can look over that as easily as all other disparities, like wealth and job-type.

The fact is, being aware of the privilege is enough to combat it, just like being born rich is enough to combat one's inability to empathize with the poor.

The issue lies with others citing it as evidence to dismiss one's opinion. Ironically, it is equally racist to do, IMO.

And how did it even occur in the first place?
Probably by stepping on others (slaves, legal discriminations, etc.)

I have never been one to use race as leverage, because it isn't an excuse for failure. But "race-based jealousy", I greatly disagree with this. The color of your skin can be an obstacle in the country. It is a real and present thing. I wouldn't describe the issue as white privilege but calling it race-based jealousy is a gross understatement.

What I mean by this is it is a way for minorities (or whites) to excuse/justify their success, similar to affirmative action. Did he get the job because he's the most qualified, or because of his race?

I am merely saying that I think "white privilege" is more or less a way to hate whites and dismiss them as individuals. The reason is jealousy, just like affirmative action is jealousy. It could be privilege (or affirmative action), or it could be because that person is otherwise deserving of their success and/or stature in the community.

No doubt that was you say is true. Unfortunately there are those who will use race to their advantage. Making false claims of discrimination, claiming unfair treatment due to race, yes I know this. Bt theirs that word again "jealousy". You think affirmative action was put in place because of mere jealousy?

When affirmative action was out in place, America had a real need for it. Jobs where not being given fairly. Affirmative action leveled the playing field so black people could get more jobs. I'd hardly call that petty jealousy. Calling it that makes them seem bitter or restful. White privilege is real. Although it definitely isn't anything that could stop a person from being successful in the real world.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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10/5/2013 11:59:49 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/5/2013 8:25:43 AM, Df0512 wrote:
At 10/5/2013 2:58:57 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 10/4/2013 11:36:16 PM, Df0512 wrote:
At 10/4/2013 5:03:29 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 10/4/2013 4:11:02 PM, psychout wrote:
White Privilege is all around us. I'm white, and it's easy to think nothing of it. But how do others feel about this?

Frankly, I don't see how its much more than race-based jealousy, used to discredit white critics.
Just because someone is white, doesn't mean they caught all the breaks in life. I deliver pizza, and I see numerous minorities appearing to have a better lot in life than me.

I have seen more false claims of racism from minorities than I have real ones, which leads me to believe this white privilege has a similar track record.

Is it possible that as a society we can retract such a notion?
Of course, we can. Just like we can overlook racism at every corner, and we can look over that as easily as all other disparities, like wealth and job-type.

The fact is, being aware of the privilege is enough to combat it, just like being born rich is enough to combat one's inability to empathize with the poor.

The issue lies with others citing it as evidence to dismiss one's opinion. Ironically, it is equally racist to do, IMO.

And how did it even occur in the first place?
Probably by stepping on others (slaves, legal discriminations, etc.)

I have never been one to use race as leverage, because it isn't an excuse for failure. But "race-based jealousy", I greatly disagree with this. The color of your skin can be an obstacle in the country. It is a real and present thing. I wouldn't describe the issue as white privilege but calling it race-based jealousy is a gross understatement.

What I mean by this is it is a way for minorities (or whites) to excuse/justify their success, similar to affirmative action. Did he get the job because he's the most qualified, or because of his race?

I am merely saying that I think "white privilege" is more or less a way to hate whites and dismiss them as individuals. The reason is jealousy, just like affirmative action is jealousy. It could be privilege (or affirmative action), or it could be because that person is otherwise deserving of their success and/or stature in the community.

No doubt that was you say is true. Unfortunately there are those who will use race to their advantage. Making false claims of discrimination, claiming unfair treatment due to race, yes I know this. Bt theirs that word again "jealousy". You think affirmative action was put in place because of mere jealousy?

When affirmative action was out in place, America had a real need for it. Jobs where not being given fairly. Affirmative action leveled the playing field so black people could get more jobs. I'd hardly call that petty jealousy. Calling it that makes them seem bitter or restful. White privilege is real. Although it definitely isn't anything that could stop a person from being successful in the real world.

Let me try to explain myself one last time here. Listen carefully (I'm not trying to be rude but the underlined makes no sense given what I said):

Fact: If there is any racism to be encountered, it is most likely going to not be against a white person, since they are the plurality (and due to the fact that they are often in positions of power, in part, due to past discrimination).
Effect: If a white person succeeds or is better off in life, it is viewed as white privilege.
Result: A minority is jealous of the white man for having a better lot in life and blames race, instead of himself. (this applies when true discrimination is not in play, obviously)

Secondary Effect: This white privilege is used to dismiss any viewpoint a white person has because they don't know what it's like for others (racial stereotype because not all whites are treated this way and/or aren't discriminated against (see gays) and not all hardships on an individual minority are due to racial discrimination).

Fact: Affirmative Action was set out to level the playing field. As a result, minorities are promoted, in part, to satisfy the law.
Effect: If a minority succeeds where a white man fails (e.g. promotion at work), it is viewed as a result of affirmative action.
Result: The white man is jealous of the minority, and blames the law, instead of himself for not being as good. (This applies only where AA is not the case, obviously)

In either case, being jealous just finds excuses for others to dismiss others' talents/views/actions and allows them to not better themselves because "there is no point".
The reason I mention jealousy is because I don't hear people crying foul of affirmative action or white privilege when someone is flipping burgers at McDonalds, are homeless, or in other less desired walks of life.
My work here is, finally, done.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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10/5/2013 12:01:56 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
^ I should have clarified that with affirmative action, people dismiss the skills and abilities of the promoted. So, they blame the law, instead of realizing that the minority could have simply been the best man for the job. When this is the case, affirmative action is irrelevant.
My work here is, finally, done.
bladerunner060
Posts: 7,126
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10/5/2013 2:11:03 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
As I understand it, privilege is an oft-abused term. It's not really supposed to be used in the way you're decrying, Khaos.

It's intended use, as far as I understand it, it to speak to certain things that you're "privileged" to never encounter, or be far more likely to encounter.

As in: it is white privilege to never really have to worry much about racial epithets. Cracker doesn't have the same impact on a white guy that the N-word has on a black one.

And: It is white privilege to not have to worry about being pulled over by virtue of race alone, and to have the police be more likely to listen to you.

And, from a different persepctive: It is straight privilege to not have your sexuality be what defines you and makes people want to hurt you.

And so on.

Because of this privilege, you will never full appreciate the perspectives they come from, on a visceral level. Recognizing the privilege is step one, of course, but step two is trying to understand as much as possible...because you're naturally handicapped from understanding.

It's not "White privilege means that white people are better off because racism", it's "Because of their race, white people are less likely to encounter XYZ that are part of [other race]'s world, because the negatives are directly tied to their race". i would say any unique position probably has its privileges--though that doesn't mean that it's not in a worse overall position. But an example of what might be called "black privilege" is that you can make something overtly racist (say, BET), and have people not only not shun you as they would if you made something overtly racist for the majority, but also support the overt racism.
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muzebreak
Posts: 2,781
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10/5/2013 4:43:38 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Watch Thomas Sowell's video on affirmative action. I'd link it, but I'm on my tablet.
"Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for science intact." - Carl Sagan

This is the response of the defenders of Sparta to the Commander of the Roman Army: "If you are a god, you will not hurt those who have never injured you. If you are a man, advance - you will find men equal to yourself. And women.
ironmaiden
Posts: 456
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10/6/2013 12:46:11 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Look, all I know is the definition of racism has been twisted into a completely different idea. I have been labeled a racist because I have said that black people are generally better athletes than other races. I did not know a compliment could be deemed racist. And I can assure you that racism was not my intention. However, white people aren't allowed to acknowledge simple facts about races, even if they don't mean anything good or bad. However, black people can say what they please. I like the idea of racial equality, but "racial equality" no longer means what it's supposed to mean. It means that white people are forever racist no matter what they do, and black people are never wrong, no matter what they do. A white guy kills a black guy? All over the news. So much attention. It's automatically because of racism. (The Trayvon Martin case). A black guy kills a white guy? Not in the news, except for Fox News. Nothing important. White people have no privileges anymore.
"I know what you're thinking. 'Did he fire six shots or only five?' Well, to tell you the truth, in all this excitement I kinda lost track myself. But being that his is a .44 Magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world and will blow your head clean off, you've got to ask yourself a question. 'Do I feel lucky?' Well, do ya, punk?"
Df0512
Posts: 966
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10/6/2013 9:50:40 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/5/2013 11:59:49 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 10/5/2013 8:25:43 AM, Df0512 wrote:
At 10/5/2013 2:58:57 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 10/4/2013 11:36:16 PM, Df0512 wrote:
At 10/4/2013 5:03:29 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 10/4/2013 4:11:02 PM, psychout wrote:
White Privilege is all around us. I'm white, and it's easy to think nothing of it. But how do others feel about this?

Frankly, I don't see how its much more than race-based jealousy, used to discredit white critics.
Just because someone is white, doesn't mean they caught all the breaks in life. I deliver pizza, and I see numerous minorities appearing to have a better lot in life than me.

I have seen more false claims of racism from minorities than I have real ones, which leads me to believe this white privilege has a similar track record.

Is it possible that as a society we can retract such a notion?
Of course, we can. Just like we can overlook racism at every corner, and we can look over that as easily as all other disparities, like wealth and job-type.

The fact is, being aware of the privilege is enough to combat it, just like being born rich is enough to combat one's inability to empathize with the poor.

The issue lies with others citing it as evidence to dismiss one's opinion. Ironically, it is equally racist to do, IMO.

And how did it even occur in the first place?
Probably by stepping on others (slaves, legal discriminations, etc.)

I have never been one to use race as leverage, because it isn't an excuse for failure. But "race-based jealousy", I greatly disagree with this. The color of your skin can be an obstacle in the country. It is a real and present thing. I wouldn't describe the issue as white privilege but calling it race-based jealousy is a gross understatement.

What I mean by this is it is a way for minorities (or whites) to excuse/justify their success, similar to affirmative action. Did he get the job because he's the most qualified, or because of his race?

I am merely saying that I think "white privilege" is more or less a way to hate whites and dismiss them as individuals. The reason is jealousy, just like affirmative action is jealousy. It could be privilege (or affirmative action), or it could be because that person is otherwise deserving of their success and/or stature in the community.

No doubt that was you say is true. Unfortunately there are those who will use race to their advantage. Making false claims of discrimination, claiming unfair treatment due to race, yes I know this. Bt theirs that word again "jealousy". You think affirmative action was put in place because of mere jealousy?

When affirmative action was out in place, America had a real need for it. Jobs where not being given fairly. Affirmative action leveled the playing field so black people could get more jobs. I'd hardly call that petty jealousy. Calling it that makes them seem bitter or restful. White privilege is real. Although it definitely isn't anything that could stop a person from being successful in the real world.

Let me try to explain myself one last time here. Listen carefully (I'm not trying to be rude but the underlined makes no sense given what I said):

Fact: If there is any racism to be encountered, it is most likely going to not be against a white person, since they are the plurality (and due to the fact that they are often in positions of power, in part, due to past discrimination).
Effect: If a white person succeeds or is better off in life, it is viewed as white privilege.
Result: A minority is jealous of the white man for having a better lot in life and blames race, instead of himself. (this applies when true discrimination is not in play, obviously)

Secondary Effect: This white privilege is used to dismiss any viewpoint a white person has because they don't know what it's like for others (racial stereotype because not all whites are treated this way and/or aren't discriminated against (see gays) and not all hardships on an individual minority are due to racial discrimination).

Fact: Affirmative Action was set out to level the playing field. As a result, minorities are promoted, in part, to satisfy the law.
Effect: If a minority succeeds where a white man fails (e.g. promotion at work), it is viewed as a result of affirmative action.
Result: The white man is jealous of the minority, and blames the law, instead of himself for not being as good. (This applies only where AA is not the case, obviously)

In either case, being jealous just finds excuses for others to dismiss others' talents/views/actions and allows them to not better themselves because "there is no point".
The reason I mention jealousy is because I don't hear people crying foul of affirmative action or white privilege when someone is flipping burgers at McDonalds, are homeless, or in other less desired walks of life.

Thank you for further explaining your position. My problem was that you sounded as if you were saying the only reason for affirmative action is jealousy and not discrimination. You did say "affirmative action is jealousy". The reason why I can agree with you now, "(this applies when true discrimination is not in play, obviously)".

Although I don't understand why anybody would "cry foul of affirmative action or white privilege when someone is flipping burgers at McDonalds, are homeless, or in other less desired walks of life." Isn't affirmative action about getting ahead in life. Those things , minus the job at Mcdonlads, would be a step back. As for you "Secondary Effect", the problem comes in when a white persons tells a minority discrimination doesn't exist when to the minority , it clearly does. It adds insult to injury when the minority is accused of making false claims of discrimination when to the minority ,the claims are clearly valid.

There is a certain level of understanding that only experience can give. Especially when it comes to something so shifty like racism. It can come in so many different forms, you'd have to experience them to be able to observe it from without. Otherwise you couldn't recognize the discrimination when it does occur. Not aways the case but it is primarily IMO.
psychout
Posts: 9
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10/6/2013 11:57:28 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/6/2013 12:46:11 AM, ironmaiden wrote:
Look, all I know is the definition of racism has been twisted into a completely different idea. I have been labeled a racist because I have said that black people are generally better athletes than other races. I did not know a compliment could be deemed racist. And I can assure you that racism was not my intention. However, white people aren't allowed to acknowledge simple facts about races, even if they don't mean anything good or bad. However, black people can say what they please. I like the idea of racial equality, but "racial equality" no longer means what it's supposed to mean. It means that white people are forever racist no matter what they do, and black people are never wrong, no matter what they do. A white guy kills a black guy? All over the news. So much attention. It's automatically because of racism. (The Trayvon Martin case). A black guy kills a white guy? Not in the news, except for Fox News. Nothing important. White people have no privileges anymore.

I think the idea is (or at least should be) that everyone is different and unique, and any stereotype or generalization we make is saying that we believe most people who are *blank* are *blank*. While that idea might even be supported by facts, people still do not want to be part of stereotypes, because like anyone else, no matter who they are, want to be seen as unique, and be seen as who we are. Yet, society seems to create replicas of people over and over. Many women are trying to look 'perfect', like magazine models. We are very leery to be ourselves, because no matter who we are, we will be criticized. We are walking contradictions just trying to be accepted.

Yet, the color of a persons skin is unchangeable, and that makes it easier to make generalizations about a group of people. I believe we simply need to see people, no matter what group they belong to, as unique. We should accept their appearance, their individual strengths and weaknesses and get to know the whole person. This would be true equality. But of course, this is a huge dream and would take a lot of work and participation of society as a whole.

With regards to how white and black people are represented on the news as you explained, I agree. They can give all the coverage they would like to events such as the The Trayvon Martin case. Yet, there are so many other stories similar to this, that are not shown. It was okay that so many people supported OJ, but if anyone supported the man who killed Trayvon Martin or even just rejected the case in any way, would be looked down upon. Anyone who does wrong, should be set straight, period. But unfortunately, everyone has their own definition of 'wrong'.

There are good and bad people everywhere, no matter what they look like. I just always go back to just taking everyone as they are, and then going from there. Take away all the preexisting ideas we have, and look at people you meet as a blank slate. Let them write on their own 'slate'. Then, once you have a good idea of who they are, you can pass your judgment of whether or not you like the person.
ironmaiden
Posts: 456
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10/6/2013 1:17:24 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/6/2013 11:57:28 AM, psychout wrote:
I think the idea is (or at least should be) that everyone is different and unique, and any stereotype or generalization we make is saying that we believe most people who are *blank* are *blank*. While that idea might even be supported by facts, people still do not want to be part of stereotypes, because like anyone else, no matter who they are, want to be seen as unique, and be seen as who we are. Yet, society seems to create replicas of people over and over. Many women are trying to look 'perfect', like magazine models. We are very leery to be ourselves, because no matter who we are, we will be criticized. We are walking contradictions just trying to be accepted.

Yet, the color of a persons skin is unchangeable, and that makes it easier to make generalizations about a group of people. I believe we simply need to see people, no matter what group they belong to, as unique. We should accept their appearance, their individual strengths and weaknesses and get to know the whole person. This would be true equality. But of course, this is a huge dream and would take a lot of work and participation of society as a whole.

With regards to how white and black people are represented on the news as you explained, I agree. They can give all the coverage they would like to events such as the The Trayvon Martin case. Yet, there are so many other stories similar to this, that are not shown. It was okay that so many people supported OJ, but if anyone supported the man who killed Trayvon Martin or even just rejected the case in any way, would be looked down upon. Anyone who does wrong, should be set straight, period. But unfortunately, everyone has their own definition of 'wrong'.

There are good and bad people everywhere, no matter what they look like. I just always go back to just taking everyone as they are, and then going from there. Take away all the preexisting ideas we have, and look at people you meet as a blank slate. Let them write on their own 'slate'. Then, once you have a good idea of who they are, you can pass your judgment of whether or not you like the person.

I agree with all of that. Like I said, I am not racist at all, I would like to see true racial equality. That goes for every race, not just black people. I have close friends of all races and nationalities, yet very few of them are white people. (I am one of the only white guys I know). I try not to judge books by their covers, unless they have face tattoos or the like (I have seen whites, blacks, Mexicans, and Asians with this sort of thing). But I never judge anyone by their skin color. And a murderer is a murderer, white murderers are just as bad as black murderers.

I will admit that I often use stereotypes. But I do believe that most stereotypes are generally true. Every time I walk into KFC there are many black people there. Some of my Mexican friends have many brothers and sisters. All the Asian teachers I ever had confused "l" with "r." (In my progress reports, I had a B in Dairy Assignments, this was how I learned about Asian stereotypes). And yes, seventy five percent of the time I see a car accident or bad driver on the road, the person at fault is Asian. This does not mean every black guy likes KFC. Not every Asian is a bad driver, or confuses ls with rs. And making a generalization about a race that is more of a compliment is not racist. Look at every football team, 90% of it is black, and they all have funny names. But the fact that black people are generally more athletic than white people is true, and not racist.
"I know what you're thinking. 'Did he fire six shots or only five?' Well, to tell you the truth, in all this excitement I kinda lost track myself. But being that his is a .44 Magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world and will blow your head clean off, you've got to ask yourself a question. 'Do I feel lucky?' Well, do ya, punk?"