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Solution to rising oceans

1Devilsadvocate
Posts: 1,518
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2/4/2014 7:20:50 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Why can't the problem of rising ocean levels (due to polar ice caps melting) be solved by creating a system of aqueducts to drain water inland?
These aqueducts would lead to locations such as:
Extremely low/deep places on land with elevations below sea level
Poles of inaccessibility (I.E. points that are farthest from oceans)
Extremely dry places
Places in need of water
Uninhabited/able areas
Areas which will facilitate the spread/ movement of water further inland (whether via weather patterns such as precipitation, or "natural aqueducts" such as valleys/canyons)
etc.

It seems to obvious a solution to have been missed, so I guess I'm wondering what the problem with it is.
I cannot write in English, because of the treacherous spelling. When I am reading, I only hear it and am unable to remember what the written word looks like."
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Jack212
Posts: 572
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2/7/2014 7:20:26 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/4/2014 7:20:50 PM, 1Devilsadvocate wrote:
Why can't the problem of rising ocean levels (due to polar ice caps melting) be solved by creating a system of aqueducts to drain water inland?
These aqueducts would lead to locations such as:
Extremely low/deep places on land with elevations below sea level
Poles of inaccessibility (I.E. points that are farthest from oceans)
Extremely dry places
Places in need of water
Uninhabited/able areas
Areas which will facilitate the spread/ movement of water further inland (whether via weather patterns such as precipitation, or "natural aqueducts" such as valleys/canyons)
etc.

It seems to obvious a solution to have been missed, so I guess I'm wondering what the problem with it is.

The oceans rise too slowly to make use of the water. You'd also need a filtration system to remove the salt before the water could be directed inland, and then you'd have to deal with the salt somehow. It's not an efficient solution.
R0b1Billion
Posts: 3,733
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2/7/2014 7:27:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
You're answer is similar to a smoker who wants to solve emphysema by taking medications instead of stopping smoking. The only answer is to fix the problem - reducing consumption of fossil fuels - not trying to create dubious technical solutions which are themselves remedies to other technical solutions in the first place. When technology causes externalities, the answer is to decrease the technology, not find more technologies!
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Such
Posts: 1,110
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2/7/2014 7:29:16 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/4/2014 7:20:50 PM, 1Devilsadvocate wrote:
Why can't the problem of rising ocean levels (due to polar ice caps melting) be solved by creating a system of aqueducts to drain water inland?
These aqueducts would lead to locations such as:
Extremely low/deep places on land with elevations below sea level
Poles of inaccessibility (I.E. points that are farthest from oceans)
Extremely dry places
Places in need of water
Uninhabited/able areas
Areas which will facilitate the spread/ movement of water further inland (whether via weather patterns such as precipitation, or "natural aqueducts" such as valleys/canyons)
etc.

It seems to obvious a solution to have been missed, so I guess I'm wondering what the problem with it is.

Entirely possible, but terribly expensive, with little profit margin.

Those who can afford such a solution wouldn't be interested in building it, the fact that they can afford it notwithstanding.