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Ukraine, the Rest of the Sordid Story

charleslb
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3/4/2014 5:38:54 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Is Vladimir Putin an anachronistic, "19th-century" political bad guy as U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has portrayed him? Sure, fine, I'm certainly no fan of ole Vlad the Invader. Personally I view him as a political alpha male trying to subject a neighboring nation to his dominance. But don't allow the American government and corporate-owned "news" media to paint a picture of the current situation in which he's the only, or the focal bad guy. There is in fact another villain of the piece who deserves our critical attention.

By all means, forget all of the risible rubbish of conspiracist kooks, there's no satanic cabal of Jewish bankers plotting to turn the planet into a vast system of gulags; but there most certainly are behind-the-scenes forces, economic elites and the front organizations (the National Endowment for Democracy and the IMF) and government agencies (the State Department) who serve their interests, that are at work creating history, and that have played a significant role in the glossed-over genesis, the largely-ignored-by-the-mainstream-media backstory of "the crisis in the Ukraine".

In short, the Freevil Empire, as I'll call it, i.e. the plutocratic economic and political world order that used to propagandistically be called "The Free World" and that was always the larger and arguably more menacing "evil empire", has for a while now been working its influence in Ukraine to move that country in the direction of joining it; in the direction of a relationship with the EU and NATO that would move the Ukrainian state and economy out of Russia's sphere of influence and submit them to the hegemony of the West. Which is all to say that the corporate and financial power elite of the rich and dominant nations of the West are certainly a key player; and that it's no hyperbole to say that they're Vladimir Putin's counterpart in generating the ongoing crisis, that they're the other villain of the piece.

Now this isn't really such an outrageously radical point of view, is it? Clearly the European community has realeconomik and energy interests to the East, its motives for supporting the sovereignty of Ukraine are far from pure and idealistic. Even a far-from-radical publication like the Christian Science Monitor somewhat acknowledges this: "European nations, for their part, want to see a resolution that involves not just the stable flow of natural gas exports from Russia to the West, but also the opportunity for Ukraine to deepen its economic ties to Europe over time".

The article that I quote from also goes on to say that "Ukrainians hope to hitch their economic future more closely with Europe". Well, but rather than uncritically taking for granted that this is simply the case because the West is more benevolent and a better prospect for improving the quality of life of average Ukrainian citizens than Russia let's refer ourselves back to the fact that organizations such as the euphemistically-named National Endowment for Democracy have been engaged in cultivating influence on Ukrainian public opinion and politicians, to the tune of $100 million. And let's also not forget that the Freevil Empire, and the private and political instruments of its influence, are quite practiced and successful when it comes to drawing in Eastern European states. Mm-hmm, it's practiced its MO quite effectively in other formerly Eastern Bloc nations, so it's hardly surprising that its efforts in Ukraine would lead to "regime change" in line with its agenda. And one can hardly reasonably expect Russia and its leadership to be unconcerned and stand idly by.

To quote from former CIA analyst in charge of National Intelligence Estimates Ray McGovern's Democracy Now interview (yes, he's certainly not someone with the background or viewpoint of a radical leftist like yours truly): "Now, the question is: Who"s provoking this unrest? And, you know, what I know is that you really have to stick close to the evidence. And in this case, we have incredible evidence, based - based on an intercepted telephone conversation. And who"s speaking? Well, it"s the assistant secretary for European affairs, Victoria Nuland, talking to the ambassador - our ambassador in Kiev. And what she's saying here - and I"ll just read one sentence: 'Yats,' Yats, Yatsenyuk, 'he's the guy. He"s got the economic experience, the governing experience. He"s the guy you know' - I guess as opposed to the guy you don"t know. Now, guess what. A few weeks after that, Yats - that"s Yatsenyuk - has become the interim prime minister of the Ukraine. Well, if I were a Russian, I would look at that and say, 'Hmmm, who's responsible for a lot of this?' I"m not saying that the National Endowment for Democracy is completely responsible, but they are a catalyst.

And when you have 65 - count them, 65 - projects in the Ukraine funded with $100 million, if I were a Russian, I would say, 'Hmmm, looks like they're trying to do with the Ukraine what they did to the rest of Eastern Europe,' what the U.S. pledged not to do, and that is to pluck these countries off one by one and have them join not only the European Community, but NATO. The Russians aren't going to stand for that. And, you know, the people advising Obama might have warned him that you go a bridge too far when you threaten a strategic interest the Russians consider so sensitive as the Ukraine."

Yes, interpreting what's taking place in Ukrane is not at all such a black and white proposition, the truth is not so easily reducible to the American spin that it's just a matter of Vladimir Putin behaving like a classic baddie. Yes, once again the hands of the capitalist masters of the universe (thanks for the expression Tom Wolfe) are not at all cean. And as we've seen the same sort of thing happen time and again (most recently in the Middle East, to quote Ray McGovern again, on the revolutions of "the Arab sring" and the Ukrainian situation: 'If you look at Bahrain, you know, if you look at Syria - even Egypt, to an extent - these were initially popular uprisings. The question is: Who took them over? Who spurred them? Who provoked them even more for their own particular strategic interests? And it's very clear what's happened to the Ukraine. It used to be the CIA doing these things. I know that for a fact. OK, now it's the National Endowment for Democracy, a hundred million bucks, 65 projects in the Ukraine. So, again, you don't have to be a paranoid Russian to suggest that, you know, they're really trying to do what they - do in the Ukraine what they've done in the rest of Eastern Europe and elsewhere"), we would have to be willfully forgetful-of-history and naive to fail to give credence to the critical viewpoint that expects the government of the United States to continue to be a part of the problem rather than a sincere seeker of solutions.

Alas, American politicians can't even speak to the current situation, to the prospect of escalating Russian intervention, without indulging in laughably hypocritical sanctimoniousness about Ukrainian national sovereignty. They don't seem to realize that the recent bit of U.S. militarism and imperialism in Iraq, which was of course most grievously in violation of that country's sovereignty (to the tune of perhaps a million murdered human beings called Iraqis), and the continuing presence of an occupation force in Afghanistan disqualifies Americans from once again mounting their moral high horse. Mm-hmm, the Obama administration seems to have nothing to offer but righteous platitudes and punitive sanctions. He's hardly an authentic progressive or "Marxist", as his conservative haters characterize him, who's going to

Continued below
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
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3/4/2014 5:40:24 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Conclusion

put the kibosh on the skulduggery of the capitalist powers that be and attempt to work with Putin in good faith. This is indeed unfortunate, because " if the president thinks that he can face down Vladimir Putin on this issue, he"s in for a sorry miscalculation." (McGovern)

In conclusion, the Freevil Empire strikes again, "the EU and the IMF were trying to sort of wean the Ukraine, taking advantage of its basket-case economy" (McGovern), the National Endowment for Democracy and the American State Department were up to the same sort of efforts, and voila, we find ourselves witnessing a coup and regime change. Rather than focusing exclusively on Russia's unfortunate response we need to be assigning a major measure of responsibility to our own ruling elite, because if we fail to learn from current events history will surely continue to repeat itself

As for the ongoing state of affairs, there are political and economic elites in Ukraine on both sides of the issues confronting their society, political and economic elites who support casting their country's lot with the Freevil Empire, and those who support closer ties with Russia; Obama of course sides with the former, and Putin with the latter. The ordinary people of Ukraine are caught in the middle and subjected to manipulation, no one is sincerely taking up their cause. Clearly, their cause will only receive support from the West if the ordinary citizens of Western nations raise their voices and insist that their leaders begin to take a principled stance. In other words, our part is to enlighten ourselves about the situation and to impose enlightenment on our elected representatives. Otherwise all we can realistically expect from them is more of the same realpolitik and realeconomik that helped create the crisis in the first place.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
AnDoctuir
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3/4/2014 8:11:31 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Interesting post, dude. I'm never going to have anything to argue with you about, but keep making posts, lol.
charleslb
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3/4/2014 11:17:41 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/4/2014 8:11:31 PM, AnDoctuir wrote:
Interesting post, dude. I'm never going to have anything to argue with you about, but keep making posts, lol.

Thanks.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
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3/4/2014 11:31:25 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Sloppy error correction. "... have been engaged in cultivating influence on Ukrainian public opinion and politicians ..." should instead read: ... have been engaged in cultivating influence over Ukrainian public opinion and politicians ...
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
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3/5/2014 2:17:07 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Hmm, is this perhaps a topic that folks here aren't that terribly interested in?
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
AnDoctuir
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3/5/2014 2:18:20 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/5/2014 2:17:07 AM, charleslb wrote:
Hmm, is this perhaps a topic that folks here aren't that terribly interested in?

We're slowly winning, charles.
ben2974
Posts: 767
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3/5/2014 10:55:07 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Note: I didn't know many of the behind-the-scenes affairs that you highlight in this article.

SO you're saying that Putin's concerns/actions aren't wholly unjustified?
Regardless....,
If I were to represent the West, I'd have a pretty good smile. I mean that, over here, life is pretty damn good. And if I want more people (Ukraine) to experience what I'm going through, i'd find ways to show them the path. Not only will I make them smile, but I myself will also grin even more. I don't see anything wrong with extending a hand, somewhat forceful as it may seem. You know, The U.S offered a hand to the Soviet Union after WWII, but they refused any aid from their ideological counterpart. I don't actually think the West wants to see Russia crumble. We need them, they need us.

I agree, though, that playing a hand under the table is not wholly justified, as it's not an honest gest.
charleslb
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3/5/2014 6:45:35 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Well, now we have this business of a UN special envoy being terrorized and driven out of Crimea by armed pro-Putin vigilantes. Such behavior will of course make it easier for American political figures, media, and an ill-informed public to focus exclusively on the villainy of Russia (something we've of course been well conditioned to do by the kind of propaganda, patrotism, and anti-Russian paranoia programmed into us as a culture during the decades of the Cold War) with virtually no awareness of the rest of the sordid story of how the National Endowment for Democracy, the U.S. State Deartment, the IMF, et al. have been actively engaged in cultivating and working their influence, influence which has been a significant causal factor in producing the ongoing crisis. Yes, just as during the Cold War it seldom reached the awareness and disturbed the peace of mind of John and Jane Q. Public that the CIA was engaged in genuinely dastardly covert methods that resulted in coups and civil wars, we, the naive nephews and nieces of Uncle Sam (the illiterate-about-foreign-affairs people of this country) can continue to watch current events unfold on the news in blissful ignorance, sleeping the sleep of the righteous sleepwalker through history.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
nummi
Posts: 294
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3/5/2014 7:17:41 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
In all honesty, Russia actually is better than US... And I live right next to Russia. I know perfectly well what Russia is like, and there's little good there (people who are against Russian way of dominance are forced down, but then who of those forced down people are for US? If most then Russia is doing a very good thing... in comparison). While US lies and deceives people, Russia is far more direct. If you want to fvck people over real hard for absolutely no good reason, then at least be honest about it.
Really would be nice if there was a strong movement that goes against both of them.
YYW
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3/5/2014 7:59:55 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/5/2014 7:17:41 PM, nummi wrote:
In all honesty, Russia actually is better than US... And I live right next to Russia. I know perfectly well what Russia is like, and there's little good there (people who are against Russian way of dominance are forced down, but then who of those forced down people are for US? If most then Russia is doing a very good thing... in comparison). While US lies and deceives people, Russia is far more direct. If you want to fvck people over real hard for absolutely no good reason, then at least be honest about it.
Really would be nice if there was a strong movement that goes against both of them.

Imabench needs to see this. This is prime TWS material.
Tsar of DDO
YYW
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3/5/2014 9:39:05 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/4/2014 5:38:54 PM, charleslb wrote:
Is Vladimir Putin an anachronistic, "19th-century" political bad guy as U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has portrayed him? Sure, fine, I'm certainly no fan of ole Vlad the Invader.

Vlad the invader. I absolutely love that. I can't believe I didn't think of it! But, damn. That's fantastic.

Now this isn't really such an outrageously radical point of view, is it? Clearly the European community has realeconomik and energy interests to the East, its motives for supporting the sovereignty of Ukraine are far from pure and idealistic. Even a far-from-radical publication like the Christian Science Monitor somewhat acknowledges this: "European nations, for their part, want to see a resolution that involves not just the stable flow of natural gas exports from Russia to the West, but also the opportunity for Ukraine to deepen its economic ties to Europe over time".

There was some good stuff here, Charles, but this is probably the one thing I want to talk most about. Europe depends on Russia for natural gas, other forms of energy and some other mining/mineral resources to a pretty substantial degree. I think it's something like 30% of all of Europe's natural gas comes from Russia.

Right now, what's keeping the Europeans from doing anything more bold than they already have comes from the pain they know they'd face if Russia decided to shut off the gas. The United States could start exporting natural gas to the EU, but right now our production capacity is almost wholly insufficient to meet demand and we just can't compete with what has become a petrochemical empire of political corruption and mafia-state thuggery.

But, let's think about what Putin wants in this. He has a very real interest in not taking Crimea, but with strengthening Russia's influence in Crimea. He needs for Crimea to remain a part of Ukraine because as a part of Ukraine, he ensures seven figures worth of votes for whatever Russia wants at the expense of what the western half of Ukraine wants. And he knows it.

Putin also knows that no one wants to risk war. The world isn't clear whether he's bluffing or not, or at least they weren't, until Putin sent troops under the dark of night to "protect Russian interests" in the Crimean peninsula. We all know bullsh!t when we see it, and this is some spectacularly shitty stuff, too. Even though "the west" (and by "the west" I mean NATO, or the US alone) could drive Russia out of Crimea, the costs of victory would hardly be justified. Crimea is a powder keg, and the last thing anyone wants is a land-war between major powers -but that is clearly the stakes here.

In a less related note, Russian "capitalism" is an absolute farce. It's a petrochemical mafia-state where power exists only in who is the more thuggish thug. It's a blight on the industrial world, and it is the Russian people who suffer for it. Russia's treatment of women, gays and foreigners is abysmal. The very state of the poor in Russia is enough to morally condemn the country in totality -even if one only went no further than Moscow's slums. That is to say nothing of Siberia...
Tsar of DDO
charleslb
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3/6/2014 2:15:16 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/5/2014 9:39:05 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/4/2014 5:38:54 PM, charleslb wrote:
Is Vladimir Putin an anachronistic, "19th-century" political bad guy as U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has portrayed him? Sure, fine, I'm certainly no fan of ole Vlad the Invader.

Vlad the invader. I absolutely love that. I can't believe I didn't think of it! But, damn. That's fantastic.

Now this isn't really such an outrageously radical point of view, is it? Clearly the European community has realeconomik and energy interests to the East, its motives for supporting the sovereignty of Ukraine are far from pure and idealistic. Even a far-from-radical publication like the Christian Science Monitor somewhat acknowledges this: "European nations, for their part, want to see a resolution that involves not just the stable flow of natural gas exports from Russia to the West, but also the opportunity for Ukraine to deepen its economic ties to Europe over time".

There was some good stuff here, Charles, but this is probably the one thing I want to talk most about. Europe depends on Russia for natural gas, other forms of energy and some other mining/mineral resources to a pretty substantial degree. I think it's something like 30% of all of Europe's natural gas comes from Russia.

Right now, what's keeping the Europeans from doing anything more bold than they already have comes from the pain they know they'd face if Russia decided to shut off the gas. The United States could start exporting natural gas to the EU, but right now our production capacity is almost wholly insufficient to meet demand and we just can't compete with what has become a petrochemical empire of political corruption and mafia-state thuggery.

But, let's think about what Putin wants in this. He has a very real interest in not taking Crimea, but with strengthening Russia's influence in Crimea. He needs for Crimea to remain a part of Ukraine because as a part of Ukraine, he ensures seven figures worth of votes for whatever Russia wants at the expense of what the western half of Ukraine wants. And he knows it.

Putin also knows that no one wants to risk war. The world isn't clear whether he's bluffing or not, or at least they weren't, until Putin sent troops under the dark of night to "protect Russian interests" in the Crimean peninsula. We all know bullsh!t when we see it, and this is some spectacularly shitty stuff, too. Even though "the west" (and by "the west" I mean NATO, or the US alone) could drive Russia out of Crimea, the costs of victory would hardly be justified. Crimea is a powder keg, and the last thing anyone wants is a land-war between major powers -but that is clearly the stakes here.

In a less related note, Russian "capitalism" is an absolute farce. It's a petrochemical mafia-state where power exists only in who is the more thuggish thug. It's a blight on the industrial world, and it is the Russian people who suffer for it. Russia's treatment of women, gays and foreigners is abysmal. The very state of the poor in Russia is enough to morally condemn the country in totality -even if one only went no further than Moscow's slums. That is to say nothing of Siberia...

Thank you for a very substantive reply. There's really nothing that I would argue with here. I'll merely observe that capitalism in all societies invariably degenerates into a farce to one degree or another, i.e. into a cruel travesty of what it's beguilingly portrayed to be in the ivory-tower ideology of its free-marketarian fandom; this is the case quite simply because its inherent tendencies are destructive.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
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3/6/2014 2:20:58 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/5/2014 7:17:41 PM, nummi wrote:
In all honesty, Russia actually is better than US... And I live right next to Russia. I know perfectly well what Russia is like, and there's little good there (people who are against Russian way of dominance are forced down, but then who of those forced down people are for US? If most then Russia is doing a very good thing... in comparison). While US lies and deceives people, Russia is far more direct. If you want to fvck people over real hard for absolutely no good reason, then at least be honest about it.
Really would be nice if there was a strong movement that goes against both of them.

I understand what you're saying here and certainly agree, but unfortunately the average individual who reads this is simply going to get as far as "Russia actually is better ..." and balk, and then promptly proceed to close his/her mind. At any rate, I do appreciate the intelligent feedback.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
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3/6/2014 2:32:05 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/5/2014 10:55:07 AM, ben2974 wrote:
Note: I didn't know many of the behind-the-scenes affairs that you highlight in this article.

Unfortunately most people could say the same.

SO you're saying that Putin's concerns/actions aren't wholly unjustified?

Well, as I've already clarified, I'm absolutely no fan of Putin, but he's not merely behaving the way that he's behaving because he's a baddie, he has legitimate reasons to be concerned about the contribution that the influence of the EU and U.S. has made to bringing about current events in Ukraine.

If I were to represent the West, I'd have a pretty good smile. I mean that, over here, life is pretty damn good. And if I want more people (Ukraine) to experience what I'm going through, i'd find ways to show them the path. Not only will I make them smile, but I myself will also grin even more. I don't see anything wrong with extending a hand, somewhat forceful as it may seem. You know, The U.S offered a hand to the Soviet Union after WWII, but they refused any aid from their ideological counterpart. I don't actually think the West wants to see Russia crumble. We need them, they need us.

So, you accept the conventional wisdom that joining the capitalist world order is simply a ticket to "the good life". Well, a good empirical case to the contrary can easily be made by examining the experience of various societies that have been sucked and suckered into the allegedly benevolent clutches of the Freevil Empire (to use the neologism I've coined for this thread). It seems that the further drawn into said benevolent clutches, the more subjected to neoliberal ideology and "structural adjustment" a society is, i.e. the more the realities of debt, "austerity", and being somewhat ruthlessly subordinated to the interests of the global capitalist elite becomes a society's reality. At any rate, it's certainly not very arguable that organizations such as the IMF, the euphemistically-named National Endowment for Democracy, and the U.S. State Department have been benevolently motivated to cultivate influence in Ukraine merely by the desire to bring what passes in the West for the "good life" to its population. (Here, if you think that Yatsenyuk and the West are going to improve the economic well-being of the average working-class Ukrainian read this, http://www.forbes.com... )

I agree, though, that playing a hand under the table is not wholly justified, as it's not an honest gest.

And I hope that you recognize that such underhanded methods aren't at all anomalous, that they're in fact the standard way of operating of the economic powers that be and their front organizations.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
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3/6/2014 2:45:00 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Hillary Clinton: "... it's what Hitler did back in the 30s,"

Again, I'm no Putin apologist (please spare me any lame attempts to accuse me of being a defender of a ruler of his reprehensible ilk), and Hillary can pillory Putin all she likes for all I care, but utterly demonizing him by comparing him to Adolf Hitler, as she's now done (what chutzpah, she supported Dubya's imperialistic invasion of Iraq, which cost around a million human lives, and she's playing the Hitler-comparison card with Putin!), is such a stereotypically and hackneyed self-righteous/American response; and of course serves to concentrate all critical attention on a foreign bogeyman, thus helping to keep the American public in ignorance of the backstory of the bit of history now unfolding in Crimea and Ukraine. Yes, our government officials, politicos, and corporate-owned "news" media can indeed be counted on to create a narrative of the the Ukrainian crisis that leaves out any self-incriminating facts and leaves the American sense of moral superiority in tact. Well, the good ole American sense of moral superiority does rather come in handy when our leaders need to take a mock-principled stance. Isn't that so, Mrs. Clinton?
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
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3/6/2014 2:48:30 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Ha! That puppet of the EU and U.S., interim prime minister and key-player-with-blood-on-his-hands in bringing about the current crisis, Arseniy "Yats" Yatsenyuk, is now actually quoting that arch champion of Western capitalist hegemony, Ronald Reagan, mock-pleading with Putin to "tear down that wall"! Lol indeed! Well, (and once again I include the disclaimer that I'm no apologist for Vladimir Putin) at this stage Yatsenyuk is certainly more of a villian than Putin and his attempt to sound like a principled leader standing up for his people's freedom is a bit of absurdism, but of course this is hardly the narrative that we're being fed by the mainstream media. Educate yourselves folks, don't just credulously swallow the predictable, lamely one-sided, official version of events.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
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3/6/2014 2:50:00 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Also, everyone should read this Daily Mail article, http://www.dailymail.co.uk...
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
nummi
Posts: 294
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3/6/2014 6:14:52 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/5/2014 7:59:55 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/5/2014 7:17:41 PM, nummi wrote:
In all honesty, Russia actually is better than US... And I live right next to Russia. I know perfectly well what Russia is like, and there's little good there (people who are against Russian way of dominance are forced down, but then who of those forced down people are for US? If most then Russia is doing a very good thing... in comparison). While US lies and deceives people, Russia is far more direct. If you want to fvck people over real hard for absolutely no good reason, then at least be honest about it.
Really would be nice if there was a strong movement that goes against both of them.

Imabench needs to see this. This is prime TWS material.
How nice, commenting without putting a shred of objective thought into what you just read. How common.
TheAntidoter
Posts: 4,323
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3/6/2014 7:52:18 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Out of all the articles you've wrote, this one would have to be one of my favorites.
Affinity: Fire
Class: Human
Abilities: ????

Nac.

WOAH, COLORED FONT!
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
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3/6/2014 2:00:27 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/6/2014 7:52:18 AM, TheAntidoter wrote:
Out of all the articles you've wrote, this one would have to be one of my favorites.

Thank you.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
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3/6/2014 2:06:20 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Well, I've been watching some of the mainstream media's (CNN and other outlets) "news" coverage of the crisis and there seems to be two primary foci. 1) Politicians are decrying the fact that American spy organzations weren't engaged in spying on the government and military of Russia in a fashion that they, American politicians, would condemn with great moral indignation if they were on the receiving end, i.e. if Russian intelligence agencies were engaged in spying on the U.S. in the same fashion. Essentially, politicians are saying that they would like the CIA and NSA, et al. to engage in morally condemnable behavior not just against Middle Easterners and American citizens, but against Russia as well. How lovely. And, 2) Politicians (yes, mostly Republicans rather obviously playing partisan politics) are decrying the fact that the Obama admnistration isn't behaving in a sufficiently hegemonic manner to suit them. They would like Obama to express the hegemony and dominance of the United States in a more decisive and forceful fashion. Essentially, they'd like him to pull out the USA's penis and show Russia and the world that it's bigger than anyone elses. Yes, these are the not-so-high-minded concerns that our "representatives" in Washington and political commentators are fixating on, not the reprehensible role played by the forces of the Freevil Empire in fomenting the current situation, not any moral questions about how to proceed, merely the crass concerns of politicians viewing matters from the amoral and self-interested perspective of a hegemonic power. Nope, our leaders certainly don't suffer from excessive nobility.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
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3/6/2014 4:38:46 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
And behold the banality of Barack Obama, his sanctions and rhetoric are so predictable!
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
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3/7/2014 3:29:56 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/6/2014 10:17:55 PM, Citrakayah wrote:
Might I ask what you would suggest we do?

Well, for one thing, the public and government of the United States should not recognize Yatsenyuk and the interim government. Also, the American public should demand that its government acknowledge its share of responsibility for bringing about the current crisis. The first step toward formulating the correct policy will begin with the best policy of them all, honesty. Also, let's do away with the National Endowment for Democracy. And here's a truly novel proposal, let's try supporting authentic democracy for a refreshing change.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
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3/7/2014 3:32:14 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
A word of advice, Ivan and Ivanna Q. Public of the Ukraine, if you ever have any real choice in the matter, think very hard and carefully before committing your country into the clutches of the EU and global economic elites. That's a path not to prosperity, but rather to austerity; not to the good life, but rather to the structural adjustment of your economy so as to gear it for the good of foreign fat cats; not to an idealized Western lifestyle, but to the disillusioning reality of economic inequality, disempowerment, and precarization American-style. Don't allow yourselves to be bamboozled by all of the hype about the "American dream", the American and Western dream is in the process of becoming more and more of a nightmare for the average worker living on a low minimum wage. Yes, you'd be better advised to create a national economy designed for the well-being of ordinary Ukrainians, if you make the naive and tragic miscalculation of buying into what you think the West has to offer, well, let me extend my condolences and commiseration in advance. Mm-hmm, all of those in the West whose societies have already followed the same path will be in commiseration with your immiseration.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
charleslb
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3/7/2014 2:56:59 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Yes, the "news" media are certainly at it, programming the public with their stock-in-trade sort of interpretation of the crisis. A simplified and one-sided interpretation in which the situation is merely a matter of villainous Vladimir Putin attempting to take over Ukraine; and the question of what can the (grandiosely self-appointed and sham) white knight of nations, the United States, do to nobly rescue that country's people from his greedy-for-territory clutches. That the real, ulterior motive for rescuing the Ukrainian people would of course be to deliver their country into the greedy-for-another-economy-upon-which-to-practice-neoliberal-vulture-capitalism clutches of the U.S.'s and EU's economic elites is not something that will even be hinted at.

This is of course because the real function of the "news" is not to inform, but rather to inculcate, to inculcate the conventional worldview (the dominant ideology) of our society, and interpretations of world events that are consistent with and that confirm it. Okay, let's get down to it. As you might suspect, the dominant ideology of a society functions to justify it, and all of its actions, hence the most critical thing that you'll ever hear the dominant ideology-inculcating mainstream media say about our leaders is that they've messed up, that they've made a mistake or miscalculation or gotten us into a "quagmire", but never anything as harsh and honest as the truth; in the current case in point, the truth that our leaders are serving the economic interests of the business and banking elite by helping it gain control of another available-for-the-plucking economy.

Heck, why would a "free society" ever need an official, obviously propagandistic news agency such as Pravda when the privately, corporately-controlled media performs such yeoman's service promoting the official and propagandistic view of things?! The economic elite certainly doesn't need to reveal the extent to which it's running the show by getting heavy-handed, it can simply allow our culture and the culture of the news media to do its thing, to enculturate journalists, news readers, and commentators to be mainstream, to think within the ideological box, and to be unwitting and good little purveyors of indoctrinatory pabulum, . And this is certainly how the U.S. news media is currently functioning; i.e. as purveyors of a biased, pro-Western world order/anti-Russian, pabulumy sort of coverage and analysis that the American mind has been conditioned to be receptive to.

Well then folks, to answer the question "What can I do?", first off each of us needs to personally free his/her mind, and the minds of his/her neighbors from their conditioning and programming, otherwise how can we ever hope to be genuinely enlightened and effective champions of the cause of freedom in Ukraine, or in our own society. Liberation begins between your ears, it begins by being more critical-minded about what your ears take in when you're watching CNN or Brian Williams, and it begins by sharing your critical thinking. Yes, the first step in the struggle against the Freevil Empire, and to create a more humanly-decent world order, is the struggle for men's (and women's) minds, to wrest our minds away from the media. May we all join that struggle ASAP.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.
sadolite
Posts: 8,838
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3/7/2014 7:10:44 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Stupid Ukraine, Used to be the third largest nuclear power in the world. Kicking them selves in the AZZ now. Used to have over 4000 nukes, gave them all back to Russia. Didn't even keep one. What dumbs azzes.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
charleslb
Posts: 4,740
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3/8/2014 3:11:18 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 3/7/2014 7:10:44 PM, sadolite wrote:
Stupid Ukraine, Used to be the third largest nuclear power in the world. Kicking them selves in the AZZ now. Used to have over 4000 nukes, gave them all back to Russia. Didn't even keep one. What dumbs azzes.

Ah, so you're brilliantly saying that literally playing "the nuclear option" would have been the way to go?! Yes, you're just full of serious and constructive suggestions.
Yo, all of my subliterate conservative criticasters who find perusing and processing the sesquipedalian verbiage of my posts to be such a bothersome brain-taxing chore, I have a new nickname for you. Henceforth you shall be known as Pooh Bears. No, not for the obvious apt reasons, i.e., not because you're full of pooh, and not because of your ursine irritability. Rather, you put me in mind of an A.A. Milne quote, "I am a Bear of Very Little Brain, and long words bother me". Love ya, Pooh Bears.