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Homosexuality and Sports

Ore_Ele
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5/16/2014 9:29:51 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
I was thinking of putting this in sports, but since this thread will most likely be about homosexuality and sports as just a venue.

For those that don't know, Michael Sam became the first openly gay player to be drafted into the NFL (to the Rams in Round 7, if memory serves). Michael publicly came out in February this year, after the end of his college career. However, his sexuality was known and respected by his college team and coaches for his last year and it did not seem to present any problems.

In interviews leading up to the draft, Michael had stated that he wanted to be known as "Michael Sam, the football player" not "the gay football player." For me at least, it was this attitude, that his sexuality was for him only as part of his private life that lead me to be a big supporter of him. I had high hopes that he would be able to play. He was great in college, though he had to change position and struggled with that, but he had the talent. And, he has a strong motivator to try harder than any other 7th round pick.

However, it turns out that Michael has worked out a deal with Oprah to do a documentary about the draft and him being gay. Many have viewed this as a poor decision on his part, and it seems like an act of "I'm probably not gonna make the team, so lets get some fame and money now." Many (and not just FOX) have suggested that such a move will be detrimental for gay equality.

Is it beneficial for homosexuals to be overly open about their sexuality? Or does it just undermine their life and their cause?
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katebutler
Posts: 11
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5/16/2014 1:12:48 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/16/2014 9:29:51 AM, Ore_Ele wrote:
I was thinking of putting this in sports, but since this thread will most likely be about homosexuality and sports as just a venue.

For those that don't know, Michael Sam became the first openly gay player to be drafted into the NFL (to the Rams in Round 7, if memory serves). Michael publicly came out in February this year, after the end of his college career. However, his sexuality was known and respected by his college team and coaches for his last year and it did not seem to present any problems.

In interviews leading up to the draft, Michael had stated that he wanted to be known as "Michael Sam, the football player" not "the gay football player." For me at least, it was this attitude, that his sexuality was for him only as part of his private life that lead me to be a big supporter of him. I had high hopes that he would be able to play. He was great in college, though he had to change position and struggled with that, but he had the talent. And, he has a strong motivator to try harder than any other 7th round pick.

However, it turns out that Michael has worked out a deal with Oprah to do a documentary about the draft and him being gay. Many have viewed this as a poor decision on his part, and it seems like an act of "I'm probably not gonna make the team, so lets get some fame and money now." Many (and not just FOX) have suggested that such a move will be detrimental for gay equality.

Is it beneficial for homosexuals to be overly open about their sexuality? Or does it just undermine their life and their cause?

This is so interesting, I actually wasn't aware that he'd made a deal with Oprah. On the one hand, I do think it could be a good idea to document it and show what it's like to be a homosexual in this changing society, but on the other hand I does seem like it could also be something he is doing for money, and potentially could also be a disaster for homosexuals around the world. I suppose it's really one of those 'wait and see' kind of things, because it also largely depends on how the documentary is done and in what way it's presented. I personally am a humanist, so for me it's all about what people want to do, and if a gay person wants to be overly open about their sexuality they have every right to be, especially considering the oppression they suffered for centuries.
xXCryptoXx
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5/16/2014 6:30:17 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I have no problem with him doing a documentary; in fact I think it is a cool idea. I'm not sure how it will conflict with his chances or not, but regardless the documentary would be an interesting look on just how different homosexuals are treated. I would think that perhaps there was some different treatment he got or else there there really wouldn't be any grounds for making a documentary. I do think openness about homosexuality often times gets old and stale. Sometimes it feels contradictory when a gay person claims they don't want to be defined by their sexuality then announces it to the whole world and won't let the topic die.
Nolite Timere
Ore_Ele
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5/17/2014 1:57:49 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
I really likely what the ESPN radio guys said (let me restate as well, this was ESPN radio, not Fox or some political station).

There are about 15% of the people that are going to be pissed about whatever Michael Sam does, because he is gay, and screw those guys. There are another 15% that are going to support everything he does as a champion of gay rights. But the rest of us in the middle 70% have been pretty supportive of him being who he is and saying that his sexuality is his own thing and it is not a big deal, but once he gets a reality TV show [it is actually listed as a documentary, but many are questioning if it will be more like Honey Boo Boo], he is saying his sexuality is more important than football, and that is going to not keep it private.

The point was that people have always argued that what someone does behind closed doors is no concern of anyone else, but he is taking this out from behind closed doors and shoving it in people's faces.

Now, my biggest concern is not what he is doing. Because all he is doing is screwing himself over. But what is being set up. Football teams want to focus on football (big shock), and anything that is a distraction from that is going to be looked down on and potentially punished. Is Michael is a distraction that hurts his performance and is a distraction that negatively effects others on the team, he will be cut from the team. That has nothing to do with his sexuality and everything to do with his actions are hurting the team. However, it is being set up that if they do that, the NFL and the Rams will be called homophobic by a significant number of people across the country. That is my problem, that this is going to turn into something that it is not about.
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Ore_Ele
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5/17/2014 2:48:52 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Though, it seems now that Michael may have gotten the memo. The documentary has been put on hold.
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YYW
Posts: 36,303
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5/17/2014 3:12:06 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/16/2014 9:29:51 AM, Ore_Ele wrote:
I was thinking of putting this in sports, but since this thread will most likely be about homosexuality and sports as just a venue.

For those that don't know, Michael Sam became the first openly gay player to be drafted into the NFL (to the Rams in Round 7, if memory serves). Michael publicly came out in February this year, after the end of his college career. However, his sexuality was known and respected by his college team and coaches for his last year and it did not seem to present any problems.

In interviews leading up to the draft, Michael had stated that he wanted to be known as "Michael Sam, the football player" not "the gay football player." For me at least, it was this attitude, that his sexuality was for him only as part of his private life that lead me to be a big supporter of him. I had high hopes that he would be able to play. He was great in college, though he had to change position and struggled with that, but he had the talent. And, he has a strong motivator to try harder than any other 7th round pick.

However, it turns out that Michael has worked out a deal with Oprah to do a documentary about the draft and him being gay. Many have viewed this as a poor decision on his part, and it seems like an act of "I'm probably not gonna make the team, so lets get some fame and money now." Many (and not just FOX) have suggested that such a move will be detrimental for gay equality.

Is it beneficial for homosexuals to be overly open about their sexuality? Or does it just undermine their life and their cause?

I hardly fault Sam for the Oprah deal. He's not just gay, he's also black, and homophobia is much higher among African Americans than it is among some other racial sub-groups. The reasons for that are complicated and not relevant to this, but I think he might be able to (slowly but surely) reach out to the black community to erode the stigma that being gay carries there.

But, I also wholly agree that he's using his sexuality to his own financial gain. I don't see why that's a bad thing. When we think of David Beckham, we think of him as a sex icon not just because of his underwear ads, but because of the image he projects. Sex sells, and it's used just as much with heterosexuals as it is with non-heterosexuals -the point being that it's no more wrong for Sam to use being gay to film a documentary than it is for David Beckham to use his (rock hard) abs to sell underwear.

In my view, the only reason that Sam's deal could amplify homophobic behavior is if people (like those on Fox) perpetuated the narrative that Sam was a bad person for using his being gay to his financial advantage -and I think that there is no question that they will, because they trade on that kind of nonsense. I'd like to get to a place in society where there would be no need for a documentary on the first gay football player, but we're not there yet and we've got to have those steps as a society before we can get to the place where no one would really consider making a high profile film on a football player based on his sexuality.

But, to the OP's question: Is it beneficial for homosexuals to be overly open about their sexuality? Or does it just undermine their life and their cause?

The answer to that question depends on the audience, how "flamboyancy" is contextualized and how the story is told in the news. To a young, gay kid who came out to his family after Michael Sam got drafter (it was a heartwarming story on Reddit the other day), I think that Michael Sam's already had one hell of an impact. To the hard core homophobe who will sit in a bar and complain about how the mere presence of homosexuality that's visible in society "violates" their "religious liberty" or something equally stupid, it's going to have no effect. It will amplify homophobe's passions, but if not Sam, then someone else would. But I don't really care about what they think. Rather, I care what their kids think.

To the extent that homophobes complain about Sam now, they're strengthening opposition to them. Eventually, those who are intolerant of homosexuality are going to occupy the same space in society as racists do now. Although, even in the present, I think there's a real opportunity for those in the middle, those who don't like homosexuality because it grosses them out but who may have a gay relative, or something (basically those who are persuadable) to challenge their own preconceptions and prejudices about homosexuality. It might make them realize that being gay doesn't make a man any less of a man, and that homosexuality and masculinity aren't mutually exclusive.

But we'll see... I'm not much of a football guy, but I'll be happy to see what Sam makes of himself in the league.
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Ore_Ele
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5/17/2014 4:00:50 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/17/2014 3:12:06 AM, YYW wrote:
At 5/16/2014 9:29:51 AM, Ore_Ele wrote:
I was thinking of putting this in sports, but since this thread will most likely be about homosexuality and sports as just a venue.

For those that don't know, Michael Sam became the first openly gay player to be drafted into the NFL (to the Rams in Round 7, if memory serves). Michael publicly came out in February this year, after the end of his college career. However, his sexuality was known and respected by his college team and coaches for his last year and it did not seem to present any problems.

In interviews leading up to the draft, Michael had stated that he wanted to be known as "Michael Sam, the football player" not "the gay football player." For me at least, it was this attitude, that his sexuality was for him only as part of his private life that lead me to be a big supporter of him. I had high hopes that he would be able to play. He was great in college, though he had to change position and struggled with that, but he had the talent. And, he has a strong motivator to try harder than any other 7th round pick.

However, it turns out that Michael has worked out a deal with Oprah to do a documentary about the draft and him being gay. Many have viewed this as a poor decision on his part, and it seems like an act of "I'm probably not gonna make the team, so lets get some fame and money now." Many (and not just FOX) have suggested that such a move will be detrimental for gay equality.

Is it beneficial for homosexuals to be overly open about their sexuality? Or does it just undermine their life and their cause?

I hardly fault Sam for the Oprah deal. He's not just gay, he's also black, and homophobia is much higher among African Americans than it is among some other racial sub-groups. The reasons for that are complicated and not relevant to this, but I think he might be able to (slowly but surely) reach out to the black community to erode the stigma that being gay carries there.

Do you really believe that putting one's sexuality on public television is really going to help? I thought the entire thing for gay rights was that they are just like straight people. We are all equal and our sexuality doesn't matter. Having a TV show, dedicated to that very topic is a slap in the face of that principle of it being "no big deal".


But, I also wholly agree that he's using his sexuality to his own financial gain. I don't see why that's a bad thing. When we think of David Beckham, we think of him as a sex icon not just because of his underwear ads, but because of the image he projects. Sex sells, and it's used just as much with heterosexuals as it is with non-heterosexuals -the point being that it's no more wrong for Sam to use being gay to film a documentary than it is for David Beckham to use his (rock hard) abs to sell underwear.

I don't really support David Beckham, nor those damn Carl's Junior commercials. However, this isn't pimping a product, it is pushing something that many believe should be a personal and private matter (regardless of sexuality) into a public eye.


In my view, the only reason that Sam's deal could amplify homophobic behavior is if people (like those on Fox) perpetuated the narrative that Sam was a bad person for using his being gay to his financial advantage -and I think that there is no question that they will, because they trade on that kind of nonsense. I'd like to get to a place in society where there would be no need for a documentary on the first gay football player,

But we don't need one. There isn't a need for this kind of documentary. As already said, the vast majority (at least in the sports world) were very supportive of him and the movement.

but we're not there yet and we've got to have those steps as a society before we can get to the place where no one would really consider making a high profile film on a football player based on his sexuality.

But, to the OP's question: Is it beneficial for homosexuals to be overly open about their sexuality? Or does it just undermine their life and their cause?

The answer to that question depends on the audience, how "flamboyancy" is contextualized and how the story is told in the news. To a young, gay kid who came out to his family after Michael Sam got drafter (it was a heartwarming story on Reddit the other day), I think that Michael Sam's already had one hell of an impact. To the hard core homophobe who will sit in a bar and complain about how the mere presence of homosexuality that's visible in society "violates" their "religious liberty" or something equally stupid, it's going to have no effect. It will amplify homophobe's passions, but if not Sam, then someone else would. But I don't really care about what they think. Rather, I care what their kids think.

To the extent that homophobes complain about Sam now, they're strengthening opposition to them. Eventually, those who are intolerant of homosexuality are going to occupy the same space in society as racists do now. Although, even in the present, I think there's a real opportunity for those in the middle, those who don't like homosexuality because it grosses them out but who may have a gay relative, or something (basically those who are persuadable) to challenge their own preconceptions and prejudices about homosexuality. It might make them realize that being gay doesn't make a man any less of a man, and that homosexuality and masculinity aren't mutually exclusive.

But we'll see... I'm not much of a football guy, but I'll be happy to see what Sam makes of himself in the league.
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YYW
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5/17/2014 4:20:04 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/17/2014 4:00:50 AM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Do you really believe that putting one's sexuality on public television is really going to help? I thought the entire thing for gay rights was that they are just like straight people. We are all equal and our sexuality doesn't matter. Having a TV show, dedicated to that very topic is a slap in the face of that principle of it being "no big deal".

Making progress towards equality doesn't happen by just saying that it's so, and moving forward. I mean, with some people it might be -but with society it's not. I do believe that using sexuality, generally, can be productive and I don't see the reason for the stigma attached to it. But, it's still taboo enough that people feel "naughty" for having conversations about that most "mature" of subjects. So, (1) we're not all equal, yet, and (2) sexuality is a huge deal for both heterosexuals and homosexuals.

I don't really support David Beckham, nor those damn Carl's Junior commercials. However, this isn't pimping a product, it is pushing something that many believe should be a personal and private matter (regardless of sexuality) into a public eye.

Ah, I'd forgotten about those Carl's Jr. commercials. I'm on the east coast, so, yeah... we don't have those here. But yeah, Sam is pimping a product. Or, actually he's pimping three: his image, Oprah's image and the documentary -and he's using sex to do it. You're right that there are a lot of people who think that sex is, generally, something that society focuses too much on... and I'd probably agree with them that sex is overused in advertising, but I'd probably disagree with the reasons why I don't like over-sexualized advertising. But even still, if people don't like something... they can turn it off. The issue with Sam is that now "macho" football fans have to chose between watching a gay guy play or not watch football at all -and they resent having to make that choice. The issue is not that Michael Sam is gay, or that he kissed his boyfriend, but rather how people feel that his doing so impacts their lives.

But we don't need one. There isn't a need for this kind of documentary. As already said, the vast majority (at least in the sports world) were very supportive of him and the movement.

Yes, we do... probably. But that documentary isn't for you, dude. It's for women who watch Oprah, who will talk to their husbands about it, and who will be more or less accepting of their potentially gay sons for having taken a cue from their role model. You don't have to watch it (I probably won't), but we (and when I say we, I mean America) needs it.
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Mhykiel
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5/17/2014 6:03:38 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
This guys says he doesn't want to be known as the "gay football player" yet he obviously knows that is a marketing angle.

I don't watch football much, but from what I remember of the game. I don't see how sexual orientation has anything to do with running, kicking, and throwing a ball.

I would be happy if sexualizing everything like a Freudian psychologist was stopped. And sex went back to where it belongs. Dirty, sweating ugly in the back of some car or back bedroom when the kids are asleep.
Ore_Ele
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5/17/2014 11:36:37 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Another thing to note about how much we (as a society) have been accepting of him and what this means without having the distraction of a documentary.

http://www.cbssports.com...

For all rookies, Michael Sam had the #2 Jersey sales, as a 7th round pick that is unheard of.
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Such
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5/17/2014 12:16:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I agree with YYW. Part of being a professional athlete is being a celebrity. If this player didn't want to be known for being gay, or didn't want the world to know that he was gay, then he wouldn't be openly gay.

I think that he didn't want to be known as the "gay football player" on the field. I think that he was more concerned than anyone else that it would compromise his professional pursuits. However, as far as his personal life is concerned, I think he wants to be as gay as possible. Not only because he's gay, but also as an example to all the other gay guys out there who don't want to choose between their aspirations and their personal identities.

Being gay, it's not necessarily a lifestyle, but it does permeate everyday life. Sex is a big deal to people in general, and especially in this society. The way people dress, with whom they interact, where they go, what they do, and how they present themselves to people all has a lot to do with their sexual orientations. His lifestyle isn't necessarily some underground gay cult lifestyle, but it's still a lifestyle that reflects the fact that he's gay, whether it's a domestic situation with another man (which, as far as I understand it, it is), or the places at which he parties on Friday and Saturday nights (which I'm sure he doesn't want to change now that he's a professional football player).

But, whether he ends up on a Tv show surrounding it, or he makes YouTube videos about it, or whatever he does pertaining to his gayness, as long as he doesn't do it on the field, I still think it's irrelevant to the fact that he's a professional football player. For it to affect his career, I think he would have to tell his coach, "sorry, I can't make it to practice today, I gotta go do gay stuff."

Professional football players are constantly doing things that are irrelevant to their careers for profit (such as, as aforementioned, eating overwrought hamburgers and walking around in their underwear). They are often in Tv shows, on commercials, and in tabloid magazines. Furthermore, their sex lives have always been a topic of discussion:

http://www.nfl.com...
http://www.accessatlanta.com...
http://bleacherreport.com...

Accepting homosexuality doesn't mean turning a blind eye to it or accepting it "only when it's not shoved in your face," (which, I might add, sounds like a diluted form of bigotry, honestly). It's accepting homosexuality the way you accept heterosexuality.
YYW
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5/17/2014 1:48:04 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/17/2014 11:36:37 AM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Another thing to note about how much we (as a society) have been accepting of him and what this means without having the distraction of a documentary.

http://www.cbssports.com...

For all rookies, Michael Sam had the #2 Jersey sales, as a 7th round pick that is unheard of.

That there have been a lot of people who support Michael Sam doesn't mean that this documentary was an overreach, unnecessary, etc.
Tsar of DDO
YYW
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5/17/2014 1:48:25 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/17/2014 12:16:07 PM, Such wrote:
I agree with YYW. Part of being a professional athlete is being a celebrity. If this player didn't want to be known for being gay, or didn't want the world to know that he was gay, then he wouldn't be openly gay.

I think that he didn't want to be known as the "gay football player" on the field. I think that he was more concerned than anyone else that it would compromise his professional pursuits. However, as far as his personal life is concerned, I think he wants to be as gay as possible. Not only because he's gay, but also as an example to all the other gay guys out there who don't want to choose between their aspirations and their personal identities.

Being gay, it's not necessarily a lifestyle, but it does permeate everyday life. Sex is a big deal to people in general, and especially in this society. The way people dress, with whom they interact, where they go, what they do, and how they present themselves to people all has a lot to do with their sexual orientations. His lifestyle isn't necessarily some underground gay cult lifestyle, but it's still a lifestyle that reflects the fact that he's gay, whether it's a domestic situation with another man (which, as far as I understand it, it is), or the places at which he parties on Friday and Saturday nights (which I'm sure he doesn't want to change now that he's a professional football player).

But, whether he ends up on a Tv show surrounding it, or he makes YouTube videos about it, or whatever he does pertaining to his gayness, as long as he doesn't do it on the field, I still think it's irrelevant to the fact that he's a professional football player. For it to affect his career, I think he would have to tell his coach, "sorry, I can't make it to practice today, I gotta go do gay stuff."

Professional football players are constantly doing things that are irrelevant to their careers for profit (such as, as aforementioned, eating overwrought hamburgers and walking around in their underwear). They are often in Tv shows, on commercials, and in tabloid magazines. Furthermore, their sex lives have always been a topic of discussion:

http://www.nfl.com...
http://www.accessatlanta.com...
http://bleacherreport.com...

Accepting homosexuality doesn't mean turning a blind eye to it or accepting it "only when it's not shoved in your face," (which, I might add, sounds like a diluted form of bigotry, honestly). It's accepting homosexuality the way you accept heterosexuality.

Well said.
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Ore_Ele
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5/17/2014 6:14:01 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/17/2014 1:48:04 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/17/2014 11:36:37 AM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Another thing to note about how much we (as a society) have been accepting of him and what this means without having the distraction of a documentary.

http://www.cbssports.com...

For all rookies, Michael Sam had the #2 Jersey sales, as a 7th round pick that is unheard of.

That there have been a lot of people who support Michael Sam doesn't mean that this documentary was an overreach, unnecessary, etc.

It may not prove it, but it is certainly evidence for it. Football is the "manly sport," where the fans are all "tough guys" that drink cheap arse beer. They are the typical demographic that is associated with homophobia (except for being old, that is about the only thing they are lacking). This shows that the fans of football are pretty darn accepting (not all of them, of course, but you'll never get 100% of any group) and it shows that we are moving in a particular direction and are actually pretty far along.
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YYW
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5/17/2014 7:37:42 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/17/2014 6:14:01 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 5/17/2014 1:48:04 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/17/2014 11:36:37 AM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Another thing to note about how much we (as a society) have been accepting of him and what this means without having the distraction of a documentary.

http://www.cbssports.com...

For all rookies, Michael Sam had the #2 Jersey sales, as a 7th round pick that is unheard of.

That there have been a lot of people who support Michael Sam doesn't mean that this documentary was an overreach, unnecessary, etc.

It may not prove it, but it is certainly evidence for it. Football is the "manly sport," where the fans are all "tough guys" that drink cheap arse beer. They are the typical demographic that is associated with homophobia (except for being old, that is about the only thing they are lacking). This shows that the fans of football are pretty darn accepting (not all of them, of course, but you'll never get 100% of any group) and it shows that we are moving in a particular direction and are actually pretty far along.

So, you're assuming that it was only those tough guys who bought Sam's jerseys? Even if that were the case, if everyone already supports him, how's making a documentary going to harm anything?
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RB1
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5/27/2014 8:58:37 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
- Though the planned documentary was cancelled, the basis of the discussion is still useful in two senses. The first useful question is whether a documentary would be a positive or negative thing for progressing equality. The second is whether any hypothetical positive outcome is worth the distraction it would cause to the team. It does not make sense to say that the documentary would have been a negative factor to the "70 percent" who do not feel passionately on either side of the rights for homosexuals. The 70 percent who are not passionate are usually the people who do not have every day interactions with homosexuals. Therefore by creating a documentary, Michael Sam could bring a sense of normalcy to homosexuality for those who do not know any better. By seeing Sam go about his every day life, viewers would come to understand that he is just like anyone else. As to the second point, while the documentary certainly would have created a distraction to the rest of his team, that distraction would be there no matter what. And by embracing that distraction, Sam puts himself in a position of control, rather than being forced to be the victim of the media circus that will inevitably exist.
Df0512
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5/28/2014 10:11:33 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
A while back I was watching Michael Sam at the NFL combine conditioning. Michael Sam being the gay NFL player just signed to St. Louis Rams. The man had a raving boner. On the field. Not just cup out of place or something. If I was on the St. Louis Rams and I saw that, I'd have a problem. You want people to respect you as a homosexual athlete fine, but you have to have self control. No straight athlete is going to want to play football with a guy they know might have a boner . That's every athletes worst nightmare.
DoomSpoon
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6/1/2014 8:51:09 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/16/2014 9:29:51 AM, Ore_Ele wrote:
I was thinking of putting this in sports, but since this thread will most likely be about homosexuality and sports as just a venue.

For those that don't know, Michael Sam became the first openly gay player to be drafted into the NFL (to the Rams in Round 7, if memory serves). Michael publicly came out in February this year, after the end of his college career. However, his sexuality was known and respected by his college team and coaches for his last year and it did not seem to present any problems.

In interviews leading up to the draft, Michael had stated that he wanted to be known as "Michael Sam, the football player" not "the gay football player." For me at least, it was this attitude, that his sexuality was for him only as part of his private life that lead me to be a big supporter of him. I had high hopes that he would be able to play. He was great in college, though he had to change position and struggled with that, but he had the talent. And, he has a strong motivator to try harder than any other 7th round pick.

However, it turns out that Michael has worked out a deal with Oprah to do a documentary about the draft and him being gay. Many have viewed this as a poor decision on his part, and it seems like an act of "I'm probably not gonna make the team, so lets get some fame and money now." Many (and not just FOX) have suggested that such a move will be detrimental for gay equality.

Is it beneficial for homosexuals to be overly open about their sexuality? Or does it just undermine their life and their cause?

I would have to say yes. While it may seem a bit flashy, the fact is that those who are LGBT need role models, and that those who are uneducated need to know about the struggle and success of those who identify with the LGBT community. Millions of children, teenagers, and adults experiment with their sexualities and sometimes come out being bisexual, lesbian, gay, or queer. Now imagine you're one of them. You are told it's "a phase" or that "you're just confused". You're put up as a pariah for many and considered a moral disease, and a sinner in the eye of god. You see the media showing the murdering of LGBT persons on TV, the internet, and in the paper. On top of it, some relationships will deteriorate and those who you once trusted will become your greatest enemy. In some cases, you'll be ousted by your family and even your community. For guys, you're called multiple slurs and considered a pedophile, and for girls, you're considered a slut and not trusted by other women. Now pull all of these together with your daily stressors and tribulations and you come out with our brothers and sisters of the LGBT community. They carry a lot of weight that some of us do not, and need these role models like Micheal Sam, Ellen Page, Jason Collins, and multiple others. On the other side of the spectrum, those who are uneducated need to know that those who are gay are not pedophilic, flirtatious rapists that can be successful. In some way, everyone needs a role model, and perhaps the program will show everyone that LGBT+ folks can live happy, normal, worthwhile lives. That's just how I see it.