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Objectification of women in media and childre

katebutler
Posts: 11
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5/16/2014 1:31:23 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
It's really not debatable that women are objectified and over-sexualised in our media. I'm not trying to say that men are not as well, but let's face facts- women are the real victims of objectification. If you don't believe me, just Google it (though if you live anywhere with access to any media, it should already be evident). What I would love opinions on is how this affects children. Especially (though not only concerning) young girls, who grow up listening to, watching, reading about and idolizing women in the media who are being objectified. It's been in action for many years already- young adults with low self-esteem, being subjected to bullying, depression and isolation, which has ultimately resulted in a multitude of suicides. Is this, however, in your opinion, a real issue? Something we should be concerned about? Do you even believe it has link to the objectification of women in media? I ask because I myself have met people who don't see the link, and who aren't concerned themselves.
Please feel free to leave opinions, and remember to be kind to others and respect their beliefs on the subject.
YYW
Posts: 36,426
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5/23/2014 11:25:39 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/16/2014 1:31:23 PM, katebutler wrote:
It's really not debatable that women are objectified and over-sexualised in our media. I'm not trying to say that men are not as well, but let's face facts- women are the real victims of objectification.

Victimization by media objectification is a fiction penned by women who lack the self confidence to sidestep or ignore cultural cues from the media. The problem is not men, the media or how women are portrayed/objectified by media. The problem is that girls measure themselves against photoshopped images of celebrities, and that girls don't see those images for what they are.

If you don't believe me, just Google it (though if you live anywhere with access to any media, it should already be evident). What I would love opinions on is how this affects children.

That question presupposes a subject/object relationship between the media and children where media visits its unreachable standards of beauty on young and impressionable minds and at the expense of those young and impressionable minds -and I reject it. What impact media has on children is contingent upon the values they're taught by their parents. The only reason that unrealistic media/images would have a negative impact on children is if parents failed to teach their children how to respond to it.

Especially (though not only concerning) young girls, who grow up listening to, watching, reading about and idolizing women in the media who are being objectified. It's been in action for many years already- young adults with low self-esteem, being subjected to bullying, depression and isolation, which has ultimately resulted in a multitude of suicides.

Bullying, depression and isolation are real issues. But the remedy to those issues is not to change American culture -because that's not going to happen. The remedy is to change the way that girls and women (and boys too, because they get it just as badly) think about themselves.

Is this, however, in your opinion, a real issue? Something we should be concerned about?

To the extent that these issues concern the mental and emotional well-being of kids, all parents should be concerned about them. I'm not a parent, but I was a kid until not long ago -and I remember what it all felt like.
Tsar of DDO
xXCryptoXx
Posts: 5,000
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5/23/2014 12:09:35 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
It is was it is + What YYW said

What is culture except what those within the culture make it? Change starts with us.
Nolite Timere
Schzincko
Posts: 119
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5/24/2014 1:08:41 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/16/2014 1:31:23 PM, katebutler wrote:
It's really not debatable that women are objectified and over-sexualised in our media. I'm not trying to say that men are not as well, but let's face facts- women are the real victims of objectification. If you don't believe me, just Google it (though if you live anywhere with access to any media, it should already be evident). What I would love opinions on is how this affects children. Especially (though not only concerning) young girls, who grow up listening to, watching, reading about and idolizing women in the media who are being objectified. It's been in action for many years already- young adults with low self-esteem, being subjected to bullying, depression and isolation, which has ultimately resulted in a multitude of suicides. Is this, however, in your opinion, a real issue? Something we should be concerned about? Do you even believe it has link to the objectification of women in media? I ask because I myself have met people who don't see the link, and who aren't concerned themselves.
Please feel free to leave opinions, and remember to be kind to others and respect their beliefs on the subject.

I agree with the idea that there is objectification of women in ads. In fact, there is sexism in a large portion of the advertising industry on both sides, but the areas of focus are significantly different. I actually did a paper on this a year ago at KSU.

For women, it's fairly clear what is used for all advertising media - Sexual appeal. And of course, it is absolutely impossible to hide media from this new generation. I'm a part of it myself; we're tech natives.

I can't say I find a connection between ad media and self esteem, however. It surely impacts what young adults might choose to buy, and you hit my high school experience right on the nose with your description. Young adults with low self-esteem being subjected to bullying, depression, and all that other stuff definitely happens. I can tell you, I got the sh*t-covered end of the stick on that one.

But the depression-like stuff I faced and what I saw for the girls in the same boat wasn't caused by advertising media. For the girls, it was more based around social media (hate speech, back-stabbing drama, all the b.s.) which put on a lot of pressure. For myself, it was pressure and neglect. In my 4 years, we actually only had suicides on the male side, but more fights from the girls.

So I get the feeling it comes from looks, stereotypes, groups, relationships, drama in general. It all has a huge impact on your own self esteem, and like myself, if you have nobody to turn to, you'll find yourself searching for ways out.
Mhykiel
Posts: 5,987
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5/25/2014 4:59:43 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/16/2014 1:31:23 PM, katebutler wrote:
It's really not debatable that women are objectified and over-sexualised in our media. I'm not trying to say that men are not as well, but let's face facts- women are the real victims of objectification. If you don't believe me, just Google it (though if you live anywhere with access to any media, it should already be evident). What I would love opinions on is how this affects children. Especially (though not only concerning) young girls, who grow up listening to, watching, reading about and idolizing women in the media who are being objectified. It's been in action for many years already- young adults with low self-esteem, being subjected to bullying, depression and isolation, which has ultimately resulted in a multitude of suicides. Is this, however, in your opinion, a real issue? Something we should be concerned about? Do you even believe it has link to the objectification of women in media? I ask because I myself have met people who don't see the link, and who aren't concerned themselves.
Please feel free to leave opinions, and remember to be kind to others and respect their beliefs on the subject.

Advertising historically can change social norms. When it was big in the 40's Americans began to do laundry and bathe more.

Being a capitalist society advertising is used to created or encourage a higher demand for a product. So ads attempt to instill an inadequacy that can be filled by product X. One reason why models exhibit slender body styles is because this body morphology is seen in less than 10% of the population. By reproducing this body plan in multiple media like shows, cartoons, ads, games, etc.. a false image of society occurs where people think the 10% is the majority. Thanks to less social awareness do to online communities and technology, people are unaware of the real people around them. therefore this false social image persists.

These conditions with product X make 90% of the people think they need X to fit in to social norm.

Sex sells. Men, Women, and children have been sexualized in ads. Even inanimate objects. Additional arms are added to photos so that a persons mind picks up on it being 3 people in an intimate situation. Even the way gasoline ads are sold have sexual innuendos. When you look at the population that has disposable income to spend on product X, sex is a driving desire.

One way to balance this false impression from advertising with the purpose of selling product X, is to balance it with positive images of what the majority of people historically saw as beautiful before the ads.

But even art has been used to sell propaganda and to redefine what beautiful was. Just look at how German women were portrayed in Nazi art. They were for a short description portrayed as stocky, flat chested.

I think it is rather sexist for the OP to leave out men. You only have to look at male actors in leading roles from black and white till today. Paul Newman from "cool hand luke", is not the 8% body fat and muscles of most leading men today. G.I. Joe now has a bicep proportion to his head that is unrealistic for 90% to even get.

It is all of society being fed "Sex sales", "Bigger is better", "To be 'A' you need 'X'"

If you want to balance it out in your own little corner for you and your children, I suggest:

Read books. Your own imagination will fill in the blanks with what is beautiful and normal. Also this will draw on the people one sees around themselves thereby reinforcing what social reality is.

Appreciate other cultures and art from other cultures. By broadening a persons impression of what a human can look like they will be more accepting of their own differences and other peoples.
kitty54
Posts: 3
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5/27/2014 7:34:57 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
If men and women are both objectified (and you acknowledge that) than what makes women the "real" victims? You are implying that woman have to be more "moral" than men which is sexist.
fazz
Posts: 1,617
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6/1/2014 7:15:10 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/25/2014 4:59:43 AM, Mhykiel wrote:
If you want to balance it out in your own little corner for you and your children, I suggest:

Read books. Your own imagination will fill in the blanks with what is beautiful and normal. Also this will draw on the people one sees around themselves thereby reinforcing what social reality is.

Appreciate other cultures and art from other cultures. By broadening a persons impression of what a human can look like they will be more accepting of their own differences and other peoples.

Well said.

+1
The_Fool_on_the_hill
Posts: 6,071
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6/4/2014 7:46:03 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/16/2014 1:31:23 PM, katebutler wrote:
It's really not debatable that women are objectified and over-sexualised in our media. I'm not trying to say that men are not as well, but let's face facts- women are the real victims of objectification. If you don't believe me, just Google it (though if you live anywhere with access to any media, it should already be evident). What I would love opinions on is how this affects children. Especially (though not only concerning) young girls, who grow up listening to, watching, reading about and idolizing women in the media who are being objectified. It's been in action for many years already- young adults with low self-esteem, being subjected to bullying, depression and isolation, which has ultimately resulted in a multitude of suicides. Is this, however, in your opinion, a real issue? Something we should be concerned about? Do you even believe it has link to the objectification of women in media? I ask because I myself have met people who don't see the link, and who aren't concerned themselves.
Please feel free to leave opinions, and remember to be kind to others and respect their beliefs on the subject.

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"The bud disappears when the blossom breaks through, and we might say that the former is refuted by the latter; in the same way when the fruit comes, the blossom may be explained to be a false form of the plant's existence, for the fruit appears as its true nature in place of the blossom. These stages are not merely differentiated; they supplant one another as being incompatible with one another." G. W. F. HEGEL
slo1
Posts: 4,364
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6/4/2014 9:33:30 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/16/2014 1:31:23 PM, katebutler wrote:
It's really not debatable that women are objectified and over-sexualised in our media. I'm not trying to say that men are not as well, but let's face facts- women are the real victims of objectification. If you don't believe me, just Google it (though if you live anywhere with access to any media, it should already be evident). What I would love opinions on is how this affects children. Especially (though not only concerning) young girls, who grow up listening to, watching, reading about and idolizing women in the media who are being objectified. It's been in action for many years already- young adults with low self-esteem, being subjected to bullying, depression and isolation, which has ultimately resulted in a multitude of suicides. Is this, however, in your opinion, a real issue? Something we should be concerned about? Do you even believe it has link to the objectification of women in media? I ask because I myself have met people who don't see the link, and who aren't concerned themselves.
Please feel free to leave opinions, and remember to be kind to others and respect their beliefs on the subject.

I have a hard time classifying the issue as one that "victimizes" women, especially considering they are complicit in the overall issue.

Men while involved in the origination of the issue don't read women's magazines that are often at the forefront excessive objectification.

When one boils it down to the bare bones, it is evident that societies definition of beauty will always be deemed as more desirable and valuable than non-beautiful. We see that in conscious and unconscious behavior, such as studies showing a propensity of men and women to discriminate based upon beauty.

It is extremely hard to expand the definition of beauty because it is largely based upon biological aspects. We will always have that definition of beauty to contend with, which means we will have two groups those who fit the category and those who are out of the category.

With that said though, women need to start searching on why they are not only trying to gain entrance into the beautiful group, but why they judge other women on which group they belong to.

Take a look at lip stick. It is so wide spread and socially ingrained as a socially acceptable practice to make women more attractive. It is biologically sound that men are more attracted to red lips. Fundamentally the entire purpose of lipstick is to be more attractive to men, which in turn can help with increases in self image.

Since women are choosing to perpetuate behaviors which are designed to increase attraction from the opposite sex they are the main instigator resulting in objectification.

The only answer we have is to promote tolerance to those who are not in the beauty group or choose to not engage in behaviors designed to move one into the beauty group.

The media will change when more women stop consuming media which only portrays those in the beauty group.

Easier said than done as I can see the feedback loop which makes it a hard cycle to break. Girls only see beauty defined as the media portrays it. They engage in behaviors to chase that definition, so the media continue to reinforce it.

It is pretty clear though, the only way media changes is when the consumer base changes and it has to start with women.
Mr_Soundboard
Posts: 62
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6/5/2014 4:57:22 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Wow just reading through the posts here I'm surprised as to how many people think it's the fault of women that they are objectified, some blame can be laid at their feet but the vast majority must be shouldered by men, who dominate the arena of media and literature.

the reason women can not tell the difference between a photoshoped celeb etc as one poster put it is because they can not be expected to know who is and who isn't heavily edited and through a century of psychologically programming, they have been told by men that they must look a certain way and when they see that ideal in a magazine or on a video they automatically believe that is what they must aspire towards.
"Conscience is universal, the ability to adhere to that moral thought is not"