Total Posts:15|Showing Posts:1-15
Jump to topic:

Dealing with gender bias in the work place.

Wylted
Posts: 21,167
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/24/2014 9:46:06 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Please don't speculate or try to figure out where I work.

With that out of the way. I've noticed a lot of gender bias in my work place. I do my part not to participate or push it, but I just see it every day. Even hard working strong physically strong females get the traditionally female assignments and even scrawny weak guys get the traditionally male assignments.

On one hand I want to confront all my supervisors over this. I'm a supervisor too, but just a bottom barrel one.

I'm just scared to confront my supervisors and I know they don't even realize they're doing it. Does anybody have any advice?

Should I just shut-up about it?
YYW
Posts: 36,426
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/24/2014 10:13:47 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/24/2014 9:46:06 PM, Wylted wrote:
Please don't speculate or try to figure out where I work.

With that out of the way. I've noticed a lot of gender bias in my work place. I do my part not to participate or push it, but I just see it every day. Even hard working strong physically strong females get the traditionally female assignments and even scrawny weak guys get the traditionally male assignments.

On one hand I want to confront all my supervisors over this. I'm a supervisor too, but just a bottom barrel one.

I'm just scared to confront my supervisors and I know they don't even realize they're doing it. Does anybody have any advice?

Should I just shut-up about it?

Don't say anything unless you're absolutely sure that everyone else feels the same way.
Tsar of DDO
kbub
Posts: 1,377
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/24/2014 10:18:31 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/24/2014 9:46:06 PM, Wylted wrote:
Please don't speculate or try to figure out where I work.

With that out of the way. I've noticed a lot of gender bias in my work place. I do my part not to participate or push it, but I just see it every day. Even hard working strong physically strong females get the traditionally female assignments and even scrawny weak guys get the traditionally male assignments.

On one hand I want to confront all my supervisors over this. I'm a supervisor too, but just a bottom barrel one.

I'm just scared to confront my supervisors and I know they don't even realize they're doing it. Does anybody have any advice?

Should I just shut-up about it?

That's a tough one. It's an extremely common problem, and a big one. It'd be hard for me to speculate without without being in/knowing the situations. If there are sexist/derogatory comments made towards female workers, HR can look into it, and I believe tips are anonymous. You might also be able to reach cooperate if higher managers are part of the offenders. Depending on your relation to the other managers/coworkers, it might be worthwhile to mention your concerns.

Depending on the nature of the sexism/discrimination, it might very well be the case that you shouldn't do anything. There are risks with bringing up issues like this, from people being angry or even in some rare cases being fired. It's terrible, but women in the workplace oftentimes have to deal with sexism on a day to day basis. It may be better to choose your battles.

At the same time, ignoring the problem won't do anything to fix it. Also consider that any pressure or risk that might be on you to stay silent is probably even greater for the women who are on the receiving end of the discrimination, since their jobs are likely to be less secure and their being heard less likely.

I'm sorry I can't give you a clearer answer. I hope this helps though. Best of luck!
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/24/2014 11:06:44 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Thanks, for everybody's responses so far. I think I can address this issue without making too many waves. Most of the managers where I work are female, so it's kind of crazy that they seem to participate more in this gender bias then the men. The gender bias here goes both ways as well.
whiteflame
Posts: 1,378
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/24/2014 11:28:40 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Unfortunately, the issue of gender bias is pretty pervasive in any environment, and the workplace is certainly not free of it. Even more unfortunately, when faced with accusations of improprieties such as this, people will become defensive and view it as an attack on their personal character rather than trying to work out what's actually happening and figure out ways to solve for the problem. Perhaps there is a way to respond to this without taking people on specifically, but most programs aimed at doing so are meant to be general information sessions that are either somewhat biased themselves or are ignored and overlooked by the majority of employees.

Most people who engage in this sort of bias aren't doing it consciously - they simply have a certain bias that they utilize in their decision-making without realizing that it's unwarranted. It's difficult to work out something that's so ingrained. The best way I can think of to engineer some sort of change is just to engage people in discussion and try to sway views by getting people to consider their thoughts critically without accusation. It takes a good deal of time, and it won't work for everyone, but it seems to be the only effective way I've found for combating this type of bias.
twocupcakes
Posts: 2,766
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/25/2014 4:26:05 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
I'm a guy, and I know I have some gender bias ( a lot of people do), but I do not think I am sexist or anything. Yet, I feel what you described to be very normal, and unless a female told me she wanted tougher assignments I would probably give her easier ones.

For example, I work in an office and I female received a shipment of many boxes containing supplies and stuff that needed to be moved. It is not m job to move them but I offered to move them for her. I do not know if I would have done the same if it were a guy unless he was a senior citizen.

I don't think what you described is really malicious or anything. If a female would like tougher assignments and they talk to the supervisor I am sure she would get some.
twocupcakes
Posts: 2,766
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/25/2014 4:29:02 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/24/2014 9:46:06 PM, Wylted wrote:
Please don't speculate or try to figure out where I work.

With that out of the way. I've noticed a lot of gender bias in my work place. I do my part not to participate or push it, but I just see it every day. Even hard working strong physically strong females get the traditionally female assignments and even scrawny weak guys get the traditionally male assignments.

On one hand I want to confront all my supervisors over this. I'm a supervisor too, but just a bottom barrel one.

I'm just scared to confront my supervisors and I know they don't even realize they're doing it. Does anybody have any advice?

Should I just shut-up about it?

As for advice, I would just ask the employees if they are happy with their assignments and see what they say. Maybe they are happy with their assignment or maybe not. If not then I would give them tougher assignments.
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/25/2014 4:32:50 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/25/2014 4:26:05 AM, twocupcakes wrote:
I'm a guy, and I know I have some gender bias ( a lot of people do), but I do not think I am sexist or anything. Yet, I feel what you described to be very normal, and unless a female told me she wanted tougher assignments I would probably give her easier ones.

For example, I work in an office and I female received a shipment of many boxes containing supplies and stuff that needed to be moved. It is not m job to move them but I offered to move them for her. I do not know if I would have done the same if it were a guy unless he was a senior citizen.

I don't think what you described is really malicious or anything. If a female would like tougher assignments and they talk to the supervisor I am sure she would get some.

It's not a tough assignment thing. If it's a lot of manual labor males are the go to people. If it's extremely tedious or answering phones it's a task delegated to females.

I don't think asking solves anything. People don't want to look like complainers so they'll lie to me.
twocupcakes
Posts: 2,766
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/25/2014 4:44:45 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/25/2014 4:32:50 AM, Wylted wrote:
At 5/25/2014 4:26:05 AM, twocupcakes wrote:
I'm a guy, and I know I have some gender bias ( a lot of people do), but I do not think I am sexist or anything. Yet, I feel what you described to be very normal, and unless a female told me she wanted tougher assignments I would probably give her easier ones.

For example, I work in an office and I female received a shipment of many boxes containing supplies and stuff that needed to be moved. It is not m job to move them but I offered to move them for her. I do not know if I would have done the same if it were a guy unless he was a senior citizen.

I don't think what you described is really malicious or anything. If a female would like tougher assignments and they talk to the supervisor I am sure she would get some.

It's not a tough assignment thing. If it's a lot of manual labor males are the go to people. If it's extremely tedious or answering phones it's a task delegated to females.

I don't think asking solves anything. People don't want to look like complainers so they'll lie to me.

Well, I would not do something that you do not think is effective. Maybe the females are better at dealing with people so they get the phones. If the employees feel uncomfortable and they talk to someone then hopefully it will get resolved. Also, employees should feel comfortable talking to management if they are bothered. If you are bothered by this then you should feel comfortable talking to someone. But, I would not complain on someone else's behalf.
mrsatan
Posts: 429
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/25/2014 5:49:40 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/24/2014 9:46:06 PM, Wylted wrote:
Please don't speculate or try to figure out where I work.

With that out of the way. I've noticed a lot of gender bias in my work place. I do my part not to participate or push it, but I just see it every day. Even hard working strong physically strong females get the traditionally female assignments and even scrawny weak guys get the traditionally male assignments.


First off, I'll assume said men and women have the same job titles.

Do the women feel like they should be receiving some of the more traditional male assignments?
Do the men feel the women should be receiving some of these assignments?
(Same questions in regards to the more traditional female assignments.)

If none of them have brought it up as an issue, then you're likely perceiving a problem that doesn't exist. In this case, I'd say leave it alone.

Assuming it has been brought up:
Is anyone unable to complete the assignments they receive in a timely fashion?

As this would be an issue in itself, I'm guessing it's a no. If it is a yes, then it's an excellent reason to push for some changes for assignments.

Otherwise, bring it up in a managerial meeting (if you have them, otherwise just bring it up casually with the ones who do the assigning) that you've heard rumors some of the employees would like some variation in who gets what assignments. Call it a good idea because it will help to avoid complacency (depending on the work being done, complacency can be very bad, possibly dangerous). That way the other supervisors shouldn't misread any accusations of gender bias.

On one hand I want to confront all my supervisors over this. I'm a supervisor too, but just a bottom barrel one.

I'm just scared to confront my supervisors and I know they don't even realize they're doing it. Does anybody have any advice?

Should I just shut-up about it?
To say one has free will, to have chosen other than they did, is to say they have will over their will... Will over the will they have over their will... Will over the will they have over the will they have over their will, etc... It's utter nonsense.
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/25/2014 5:54:11 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/25/2014 5:49:40 AM, mrsatan wrote:
At 5/24/2014 9:46:06 PM, Wylted wrote:
Please don't speculate or try to figure out where I work.

With that out of the way. I've noticed a lot of gender bias in my work place. I do my part not to participate or push it, but I just see it every day. Even hard working strong physically strong females get the traditionally female assignments and even scrawny weak guys get the traditionally male assignments.


First off, I'll assume said men and women have the same job titles.

Do the women feel like they should be receiving some of the more traditional male assignments?
Do the men feel the women should be receiving some of these assignments?
(Same questions in regards to the more traditional female assignments.)

If none of them have brought it up as an issue, then you're likely perceiving a problem that doesn't exist. In this case, I'd say leave it alone.

Assuming it has been brought up:
Is anyone unable to complete the assignments they receive in a timely fashion?

As this would be an issue in itself, I'm guessing it's a no. If it is a yes, then it's an excellent reason to push for some changes for assignments.

Otherwise, bring it up in a managerial meeting (if you have them, otherwise just bring it up casually with the ones who do the assigning) that you've heard rumors some of the employees would like some variation in who gets what assignments. Call it a good idea because it will help to avoid complacency (depending on the work being done, complacency can be very bad, possibly dangerous). That way the other supervisors shouldn't misread any accusations of gender bias.

On one hand I want to confront all my supervisors over this. I'm a supervisor too, but just a bottom barrel one.

I'm just scared to confront my supervisors and I know they don't even realize they're doing it. Does anybody have any advice?

Should I just shut-up about it?

Good advice. Thank you.
mrsatan
Posts: 429
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/25/2014 6:07:54 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/25/2014 5:54:11 AM, Wylted wrote:
At 5/25/2014 5:49:40 AM, mrsatan wrote:
At 5/24/2014 9:46:06 PM, Wylted wrote:
Please don't speculate or try to figure out where I work.

With that out of the way. I've noticed a lot of gender bias in my work place. I do my part not to participate or push it, but I just see it every day. Even hard working strong physically strong females get the traditionally female assignments and even scrawny weak guys get the traditionally male assignments.


First off, I'll assume said men and women have the same job titles.

Do the women feel like they should be receiving some of the more traditional male assignments?
Do the men feel the women should be receiving some of these assignments?
(Same questions in regards to the more traditional female assignments.)

If none of them have brought it up as an issue, then you're likely perceiving a problem that doesn't exist. In this case, I'd say leave it alone.

Assuming it has been brought up:
Is anyone unable to complete the assignments they receive in a timely fashion?

As this would be an issue in itself, I'm guessing it's a no. If it is a yes, then it's an excellent reason to push for some changes for assignments.

Otherwise, bring it up in a managerial meeting (if you have them, otherwise just bring it up casually with the ones who do the assigning) that you've heard rumors some of the employees would like some variation in who gets what assignments. Call it a good idea because it will help to avoid complacency (depending on the work being done, complacency can be very bad, possibly dangerous). That way the other supervisors shouldn't misread any accusations of gender bias.

On one hand I want to confront all my supervisors over this. I'm a supervisor too, but just a bottom barrel one.

I'm just scared to confront my supervisors and I know they don't even realize they're doing it. Does anybody have any advice?

Should I just shut-up about it?

Good advice. Thank you.

You're welcome. I hope whatever you end up doing works out good. =)
To say one has free will, to have chosen other than they did, is to say they have will over their will... Will over the will they have over their will... Will over the will they have over the will they have over their will, etc... It's utter nonsense.
mrsatan
Posts: 429
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/25/2014 6:26:47 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/25/2014 5:54:11 AM, Wylted wrote:

I meant to add that even if complacency isn't a safety issue, it can leave people bored with their jobs, which can lower productivity. So you may want to suggest more variation in who gets what assignments even if you decide there isn't a problem with any gender bias that's occurring.
To say one has free will, to have chosen other than they did, is to say they have will over their will... Will over the will they have over their will... Will over the will they have over the will they have over their will, etc... It's utter nonsense.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/25/2014 10:40:32 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/24/2014 9:46:06 PM, Wylted wrote:
Please don't speculate or try to figure out where I work.

With that out of the way. I've noticed a lot of gender bias in my work place. I do my part not to participate or push it, but I just see it every day. Even hard working strong physically strong females get the traditionally female assignments and even scrawny weak guys get the traditionally male assignments.

On one hand I want to confront all my supervisors over this. I'm a supervisor too, but just a bottom barrel one.

I'm just scared to confront my supervisors and I know they don't even realize they're doing it. Does anybody have any advice?

Should I just shut-up about it?

I'd say if it is an issue of "random" tasks, leave it alone.
If it is an issue because it affects promotions and titles, then look into it.

Look into it if anyone complains.
Also, is it a sexist thing, or is it specific to a few people. Like, they built furniture last time, they should do it again.

Further, look into the cause of why men are being asked.
Is it because of delegation solely on the managers part?
Is the labor intensive job because the female boss is friendly with her female employees (i.e. give someone she doesn't like and/or is not her friend the unpleasant jobs)?
Is it a woman was originally assigned, but it was too hard for her?

The cause is dependent upon the course of action, too.

Largely, I'd probably leave it alone.
Sexism (like all discrimination) is everywhere, but it doesn't mean it is malicious.
My work here is, finally, done.