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What do you think about this excerpt?

Tiki
Posts: 3
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5/26/2014 7:19:24 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Taken from the article called "4 Reasons White People Can"t Use the N-Word (No Matter What Black Folks are Doing)"
http://changefromwithin.org...

Why should everything be in bounds to us? The question being asked is, in essence, the epitome of White Privilege. As White folks, we tend to think that every door should be open to us, every conversation should be ours, every space should welcome us. We think this way because, when it comes to racialized spaces, that tends to be the case. We have the privilege of having our voices heard and our presence recognized in just about every space there is. Thus, we HATE IT when we are told that we are not actually welcome in a conversation. But here"s what we need to understand: we"re the only people that get the privilege of access to whatever racialized space we want. White Women can hopefully begin to understand this when you think about the ways in which you are denied voice and space by dominant Men, but White people need to understand this. Just because we are not welcome to use one word in the English language does not mean that we are being discriminated against. It means that we, rightfully, need to shut up and listen.

**OPTIONAL** question: What race are you? Select from the following?
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Black
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Other - specify
Mixed - select all that apply
Schzincko
Posts: 119
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5/27/2014 6:59:54 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 5/26/2014 7:19:24 PM, Tiki wrote:
Taken from the article called "4 Reasons White People Can"t Use the N-Word (No Matter What Black Folks are Doing)"
http://changefromwithin.org...

Why should everything be in bounds to us? The question being asked is, in essence, the epitome of White Privilege. As White folks, we tend to think that every door should be open to us, every conversation should be ours, every space should welcome us. We think this way because, when it comes to racialized spaces, that tends to be the case. We have the privilege of having our voices heard and our presence recognized in just about every space there is. Thus, we HATE IT when we are told that we are not actually welcome in a conversation. But here"s what we need to understand: we"re the only people that get the privilege of access to whatever racialized space we want. White Women can hopefully begin to understand this when you think about the ways in which you are denied voice and space by dominant Men, but White people need to understand this. Just because we are not welcome to use one word in the English language does not mean that we are being discriminated against. It means that we, rightfully, need to shut up and listen.

**OPTIONAL** question: What race are you? Select from the following?
Arab
Black
East Asian
Hispanic
Native American
South Asian/Indian
White
Other - specify
Mixed - select all that apply

Hi.
For starters, I am just about as white as it gets (family history set in Denmark, France, and Germany).

Personally, although I am perfectly fine with and don't really care about the loss of privileges, I don't think it should be that way. At least not on the vocabulary aspect.

Yes, I understand that the way that nearly every demeaning curse word in the language comes from being used as a legitimate profiling insult in the past, and in certain contexts of today, all of those words can still be used offensively. But when it comes to the type of usage this article is talking about, or at least what I'm getting from it, these terms are being used way differently.

It's more of something now that is non-serious to, well, due to lack of better phrasing, express a friendship or closeness, in a way I guess.

So if the way it's being used is between friends, and it's very easy to tell if it's not, then it shouldn't be much of a problem at all. It's no different from me calling any other friend of mine by any other term.

And yet, people are still offended. Why? Is it because society is too easily offended? It makes sense that all of the demanded political correctness in our society would make people feel uncomfortable more easily. It's just not something people are used to. It's not what they could expect.