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Cultural Appropriation- The Hijab

debatability
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7/3/2014 3:54:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I know a very anti religious girl who has started wearing hijabs occasionally as a fashion statement. However, she constantly insults the Islam religion. I've been doing a lot of research on cultural appropriation and I was very surprised that no one found the act of her wearing a hijab as offensive. So I'm wondering...
What do you guys think of cultural appropriation?
Is wearing a hijab as a fashion statement (if one is anti-religious or even simply not Muslim) offensive?
Please discuss.
rross
Posts: 2,772
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7/3/2014 4:16:55 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 3:54:07 PM, debatability wrote:
I know a very anti religious girl who has started wearing hijabs occasionally as a fashion statement. However, she constantly insults the Islam religion. I've been doing a lot of research on cultural appropriation and I was very surprised that no one found the act of her wearing a hijab as offensive. So I'm wondering...
What do you guys think of cultural appropriation?
Is wearing a hijab as a fashion statement (if one is anti-religious or even simply not Muslim) offensive?
Please discuss.

Ooh. Good question. On one hand, it's just a scarf, and on the other hand it isn't. I've often thought about this in countries where it's banned - what if a non-muslim just wore a headscarf that day? Could anyone reasonably object?

Your friend sounds a little weird, but the hijab fashion hasn't reached these parts yet. Maybe in six months we'll all be wearing them. They can be pretty stylish.
debatability
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7/3/2014 4:20:02 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
There are a lot of ways to fashion a scarf around one's head without it looking like a hijab. That was probably the main reason I was a bit suprised by her action. I've never actually met someone who has worn a hijab for non-religious reasons until now.
Khaos_Mage
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7/3/2014 4:28:06 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 3:54:07 PM, debatability wrote:
I know a very anti religious girl who has started wearing hijabs occasionally as a fashion statement. However, she constantly insults the Islam religion. I've been doing a lot of research on cultural appropriation and I was very surprised that no one found the act of her wearing a hijab as offensive. So I'm wondering...
What do you guys think of cultural appropriation?
Is wearing a hijab as a fashion statement (if one is anti-religious or even simply not Muslim) offensive?
Please discuss.

Please define cultural appropriation.
My work here is, finally, done.
debatability
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7/3/2014 4:40:58 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 4:28:06 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 7/3/2014 3:54:07 PM, debatability wrote:
I know a very anti religious girl who has started wearing hijabs occasionally as a fashion statement. However, she constantly insults the Islam religion. I've been doing a lot of research on cultural appropriation and I was very surprised that no one found the act of her wearing a hijab as offensive. So I'm wondering...
What do you guys think of cultural appropriation?
Is wearing a hijab as a fashion statement (if one is anti-religious or even simply not Muslim) offensive?
Please discuss.

Please define cultural appropriation.
Cultural appropriation is basically taking part in something that is not of your cultural. Usually is is wearing a peice of clothing from another religion/culture. http://en.wikipedia.org...
debatability
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7/3/2014 5:02:24 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 4:58:00 PM, rross wrote:
Like this.

http://www.independent.co.uk...

But the difference between Lady Gaga and my friend is that Lady Gaga does not insult the Islam belief system (as far as I know).
rross
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7/3/2014 5:09:54 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 5:02:24 PM, debatability wrote:
At 7/3/2014 4:58:00 PM, rross wrote:
Like this.

http://www.independent.co.uk...

But the difference between Lady Gaga and my friend is that Lady Gaga does not insult the Islam belief system (as far as I know).

That's true. And the rules are different for outrageous fashion celebrities anyway.

I was just curious if hijabs were fashionable for nonmuslims anywhere and I came across that. Just put it in for the picture.
Khaos_Mage
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7/3/2014 5:12:45 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 4:40:58 PM, debatability wrote:
At 7/3/2014 4:28:06 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 7/3/2014 3:54:07 PM, debatability wrote:
I know a very anti religious girl who has started wearing hijabs occasionally as a fashion statement. However, she constantly insults the Islam religion. I've been doing a lot of research on cultural appropriation and I was very surprised that no one found the act of her wearing a hijab as offensive. So I'm wondering...
What do you guys think of cultural appropriation?
Is wearing a hijab as a fashion statement (if one is anti-religious or even simply not Muslim) offensive?
Please discuss.

Please define cultural appropriation.
Cultural appropriation is basically taking part in something that is not of your cultural. Usually is is wearing a peice of clothing from another religion/culture. http://en.wikipedia.org...

Then no, it shouldn't be offensive.
Why is one's culture so symbolic and holy that is cannot be mimicked?
If I go to Jamaica and see some dreads and go "that's cool", and do it, should I have taken a class of its significance?

If people are mimicking an aspect of a culture, the culture should be proud.
If the people are doing it wrongly, or for the wrong reasons, they should be corrected.
My work here is, finally, done.
debatability
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7/3/2014 5:52:54 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 5:12:45 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 7/3/2014 4:40:58 PM, debatability wrote:
At 7/3/2014 4:28:06 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 7/3/2014 3:54:07 PM, debatability wrote:
I know a very anti religious girl who has started wearing hijabs occasionally as a fashion statement. However, she constantly insults the Islam religion. I've been doing a lot of research on cultural appropriation and I was very surprised that no one found the act of her wearing a hijab as offensive. So I'm wondering...
What do you guys think of cultural appropriation?
Is wearing a hijab as a fashion statement (if one is anti-religious or even simply not Muslim) offensive?
Please discuss.

Please define cultural appropriation.
Cultural appropriation is basically taking part in something that is not of your cultural. Usually is is wearing a piece of clothing from another religion/culture. http://en.wikipedia.org...

Then no, it shouldn't be offensive.
Why is one's culture so symbolic and holy that is cannot be mimicked?
If I go to Jamaica and see some dreads and go "that's cool", and do it, should I have taken a class of its significance?

If people are mimicking an aspect of a culture, the culture should be proud.
If the people are doing it wrongly, or for the wrong reasons, they should be corrected.

I agree with you to a certain extent. However, when mimicking a part of someone's culture, the meaning of the certain piece of clothing/ symbol generally isn't taken into account. Dreads don't really hold an important religious meaning, but things like a bindi or a hijab are different.
rross
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7/3/2014 6:21:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 5:52:54 PM, debatability wrote:

I agree with you to a certain extent. However, when mimicking a part of someone's culture, the meaning of the certain piece of clothing/ symbol generally isn't taken into account. Dreads don't really hold an important religious meaning, but things like a bindi or a hijab are different.

I didn't know that the hijab had special religious meaning. I thought it was just to cover the hair, although it's kind of become a symbol for Islam. What's the meaning?
debatability
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7/3/2014 7:44:36 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 6:21:07 PM, rross wrote:
At 7/3/2014 5:52:54 PM, debatability wrote:

I agree with you to a certain extent. However, when mimicking a part of someone's culture, the meaning of the certain piece of clothing/ symbol generally isn't taken into account. Dreads don't really hold an important religious meaning, but things like a bindi or a hijab are different.

I didn't know that the hijab had special religious meaning. I thought it was just to cover the hair, although it's kind of become a symbol for Islam. What's the meaning?

A hijab represents a Muslim's choice to submit to God, as opposed to the fashion in society. Here's a more in depth explanation: http://www.onislam.net...
I don't claim to be an expert on the meaning, but I know it's definitely worn for religious reasons.
Cermank
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7/3/2014 10:30:25 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
There's a difference between "Is it iffensive?" and "Should it be offensive?". I dont think we can answer the 'is it' part, mostly because anything can be offensive if you try hard enough to get offended. About the should it part, I don't think so. I read the cultural significance of hijab, from the link. It seems like the significance of hijab comes from the 'internal' modesty. She states that wearing a hijab is useless if you dont behave modestly, so that's just an ornament to the entire muslim getup. Plus people should be free to wear whatever, nobody has a patent on any specific piece of clothing.
debatability
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7/3/2014 11:08:59 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 10:30:25 PM, Cermank wrote:
There's a difference between "Is it offensive?" and "Should it be offensive?". I don't think we can answer the 'is it' part, mostly because anything can be offensive if you try hard enough to get offended. About the should it part, I don't think so. I read the cultural significance of hijab, from the link. It seems like the significance of hijab comes from the 'internal' modesty. She states that wearing a hijab is useless if you don't behave modestly, so that's just an ornament to the entire Muslim getup. Plus people should be free to wear whatever, nobody has a patent on any specific piece of clothing.

After doing more research of the hijab I would have to agree. However, I think that if someone constantly bashes the Islam religion then it should be considered to wear a garment that is a fundamental part of the religion. But I feel like that is a fairly unusual circumstance.
Cermank
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7/3/2014 11:18:00 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 11:08:59 PM, debatability wrote:
At 7/3/2014 10:30:25 PM, Cermank wrote:
There's a difference between "Is it offensive?" and "Should it be offensive?". I don't think we can answer the 'is it' part, mostly because anything can be offensive if you try hard enough to get offended. About the should it part, I don't think so. I read the cultural significance of hijab, from the link. It seems like the significance of hijab comes from the 'internal' modesty. She states that wearing a hijab is useless if you don't behave modestly, so that's just an ornament to the entire Muslim getup. Plus people should be free to wear whatever, nobody has a patent on any specific piece of clothing.

After doing more research of the hijab I would have to agree. However, I think that if someone constantly bashes the Islam religion then it should be considered to wear a garment that is a fundamental part of the religion. But I feel like that is a fairly unusual circumstance.

I mean I wear my scarf like that fairly often, so do a lot of people here (naqab ? Like a hijab but you cover your mouth too) mainly because its so hot sometimes, and tan =/= good. I never thought of it being offensive to them. And I can't think of any reason now, I suppose. But this is an interesting topic.
debatability
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7/3/2014 11:26:38 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 11:18:00 PM, Cermank wrote:
At 7/3/2014 11:08:59 PM, debatability wrote:
At 7/3/2014 10:30:25 PM, Cermank wrote:
There's a difference between "Is it offensive?" and "Should it be offensive?". I don't think we can answer the 'is it' part, mostly because anything can be offensive if you try hard enough to get offended. About the should it part, I don't think so. I read the cultural significance of hijab, from the link. It seems like the significance of hijab comes from the 'internal' modesty. She states that wearing a hijab is useless if you don't behave modestly, so that's just an ornament to the entire Muslim getup. Plus people should be free to wear whatever, nobody has a patent on any specific piece of clothing.

After doing more research of the hijab I would have to agree. However, I think that if someone constantly bashes the Islam religion then it should be considered to wear a garment that is a fundamental part of the religion. But I feel like that is a fairly unusual circumstance.

I mean I wear my scarf like that fairly often, so do a lot of people here (naqab ? Like a hijab but you cover your mouth too) mainly because its so hot sometimes, and tan =/= good. I never thought of it being offensive to them. And I can't think of any reason now, I suppose. But this is an interesting topic.

I also wear scarves around my head occasionally. But it's never looked anything remotely like a hijab. I think that if a person is wearing it for practical purposes it shouldn't be considered offensive, but I think in such cases is should also be called a head scarf as opposed to a hijab.
wrichcirw
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7/4/2014 12:53:31 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 3:54:07 PM, debatability wrote:
I know a very anti religious girl who has started wearing hijabs occasionally as a fashion statement. However, she constantly insults the Islam religion. I've been doing a lot of research on cultural appropriation and I was very surprised that no one found the act of her wearing a hijab as offensive. So I'm wondering...
What do you guys think of cultural appropriation?
Is wearing a hijab as a fashion statement (if one is anti-religious or even simply not Muslim) offensive?
Please discuss.

Cultural appropriation in and of itself is not at all offensive and is actually IMHO an affirmation of that culture's significance. "Bollywood" for example only affirms the primacy of "Hollywood". I love mozzarella cheese, but I probably would not eat nearly as much of it if not for America's bastardization of Italian pizza.

I think what you're much more offended by is her criticism of Islam, and consider that to be offensive. That she simply likes how a hijab looks is not relevant to such criticism, isn't it? Perhaps an effective tactic would be to convince your friend how a hijab's look is significant to Islam, and then perhaps you'd find your friend's views to be much more consistent with your expectations than they are currently, as she'd either equate the hijab to her disgust in Islam, or discover a newfound respect for Islam - both of which I would imagine you'd find to be much more consistent.

I would then note that you'd probably still be offended by your friend's anti-Islamic views if she still held them, yes?
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
debatability
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7/5/2014 10:33:20 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/4/2014 12:53:31 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
At 7/3/2014 3:54:07 PM, debatability wrote:
I know a very anti religious girl who has started wearing hijabs occasionally as a fashion statement. However, she constantly insults the Islam religion. I've been doing a lot of research on cultural appropriation and I was very surprised that no one found the act of her wearing a hijab as offensive. So I'm wondering...
What do you guys think of cultural appropriation?
Is wearing a hijab as a fashion statement (if one is anti-religious or even simply not Muslim) offensive?
Please discuss.

Cultural appropriation in and of itself is not at all offensive and is actually IMHO an affirmation of that culture's significance. "Bollywood" for example only affirms the primacy of "Hollywood". I love mozzarella cheese, but I probably would not eat nearly as much of it if not for America's bastardization of Italian pizza.

I think what you're much more offended by is her criticism of Islam, and consider that to be offensive. That she simply likes how a hijab looks is not relevant to such criticism, isn't it? Perhaps an effective tactic would be to convince your friend how a hijab's look is significant to Islam, and then perhaps you'd find your friend's views to be much more consistent with your expectations than they are currently, as she'd either equate the hijab to her disgust in Islam, or discover a new found respect for Islam - both of which I would imagine you'd find to be much more consistent.

I would then note that you'd probably still be offended by your friend's anti-Islamic views if she still held them, yes?

That makes sense. I feel like the girl's anti-islamic views were what led me to believe wearing hijab was inappropriate. I like your point about cultural appropriation being an affirmation of a culture's significance. I think that in that sense it could be a good thing.
tulle
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7/10/2014 7:16:26 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Interesting topic and one I think about all the time. I do not agree that cultural appropriation is simply affirming that culture's significance. More often than not it's a bastardization and therefore mockery of a marginalized group. The fact that you can't understand what something means to one culture doesn't mean they should not be offended.

I don't mean this as an attack on anyone specifically, but that's just my two cents.
yang.
wrichcirw
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7/11/2014 12:51:13 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/10/2014 7:16:26 PM, tulle wrote:
Interesting topic and one I think about all the time. I do not agree that cultural appropriation is simply affirming that culture's significance. More often than not it's a bastardization and therefore mockery of a marginalized group. The fact that you can't understand what something means to one culture doesn't mean they should not be offended.

I don't mean this as an attack on anyone specifically, but that's just my two cents.

Ok, this is very interesting. I originally wrote out a lengthy response to this, but then realized I didn't add anything to your point by doing so. :o

I suppose your main point is "it depends", and I stand corrected in my prior assertion otherwise.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
tulle
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7/11/2014 11:42:48 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/11/2014 12:51:13 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
At 7/10/2014 7:16:26 PM, tulle wrote:
Interesting topic and one I think about all the time. I do not agree that cultural appropriation is simply affirming that culture's significance. More often than not it's a bastardization and therefore mockery of a marginalized group. The fact that you can't understand what something means to one culture doesn't mean they should not be offended.

I don't mean this as an attack on anyone specifically, but that's just my two cents.

Ok, this is very interesting. I originally wrote out a lengthy response to this, but then realized I didn't add anything to your point by doing so. :o

I suppose your main point is "it depends", and I stand corrected in my prior assertion otherwise.

Right... it generally (to me) depends on power and marginalization. Which group has the power and which group is doing the "borrowing" and for what purpose?

When something has cultural significance to one group, turning it into a "fad" makes it a thing that can be put on and thrown away at the whim of the group doing the appropriating. When that thing is something they are typically marginalized for, it really doesn't "celebrate" them or make them accepted by the "maintstream". Given the example of this person's friend, her wearing a hijab doesn't take away the persecution women who wear hijabs actually face. I used to wear my scarf like a hijab in the winter time, and I could feel the difference in the way people looked at me sometimes. But at the end of the day, I could just take it off.

Take this, for example: http://pixel.nymag.com...

vs

http://www.celebitchy.com...

The former is cultural appropriation, and there have been some interesting articles written about it. http://jezebel.com...

Whereas Angelina Jolie's outfit is not.
yang.
wrichcirw
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7/11/2014 3:42:52 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/11/2014 11:42:48 AM, tulle wrote:
At 7/11/2014 12:51:13 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
At 7/10/2014 7:16:26 PM, tulle wrote:
Interesting topic and one I think about all the time. I do not agree that cultural appropriation is simply affirming that culture's significance. More often than not it's a bastardization and therefore mockery of a marginalized group. The fact that you can't understand what something means to one culture doesn't mean they should not be offended.

I don't mean this as an attack on anyone specifically, but that's just my two cents.

Ok, this is very interesting. I originally wrote out a lengthy response to this, but then realized I didn't add anything to your point by doing so. :o

I suppose your main point is "it depends", and I stand corrected in my prior assertion otherwise.

Right... it generally (to me) depends on power and marginalization. Which group has the power and which group is doing the "borrowing" and for what purpose?

When something has cultural significance to one group, turning it into a "fad" makes it a thing that can be put on and thrown away at the whim of the group doing the appropriating. When that thing is something they are typically marginalized for, it really doesn't "celebrate" them or make them accepted by the "maintstream". Given the example of this person's friend, her wearing a hijab doesn't take away the persecution women who wear hijabs actually face. I used to wear my scarf like a hijab in the winter time, and I could feel the difference in the way people looked at me sometimes. But at the end of the day, I could just take it off.

Here you make another interesting point...how uncomfortable you were in a hijab. I got a similar reaction when I started growing a beard, lol...but if you stick to it, people get used to it. The cultural appropriate does eventually work. Sure, it may feel like you're fighting against the current...but that's exactly what you're doing when you fight the mainstream, right? =)

I will also note that in regards to the underlined, we do that all the time with Christianity, lol.

What I originally wrote and concluded was just essentially the same thing you were talking about was the use of the word "gook", which strictly speaking is indeed cultural appropriation - the Korean word for America is "mi gook", which well, sounds like "me gook", so "you're a gook", lol. I mean, yeah, the way it's used in American society is extremely disparaging and marginalizing...but that sounds different than what you're talking about now, which seems to be about giving cultural significance its proper due.

IMHO I don't think that's necessary. As long as it's not meant to disparage, then I don't think it's problematic, even if it's ridiculously out of cultural context (like say marketing Pizza Hut with American football, even though that has absolutely nothing to do with Italian pizza). It may be that my time in Asia really, REALLY desensitized me to this...I remember walking into a rather large gift shop in downtown Seoul where the most prominent display they had was a Disney marquee surrounded by hot pepper pillows (they love hot peppers there), and pillows that were...boobs of a porn star. The pillows and etc are a type of cultural appropriation I think, and I'm sure Disney would have something to say about their name being so close to cleavage...but in the end I didn't think it was disparaging...hell I thought it was hilarious.

Take this, for example: http://pixel.nymag.com...

vs

http://www.celebitchy.com...

The former is cultural appropriation, and there have been some interesting articles written about it. http://jezebel.com...

Whereas Angelina Jolie's outfit is not.

I think both are cultural appropriation and neither are problematic. I mean, the Christian cross is used everywhere in all kinds of contexts...and we don't really take issue with it at all. We may find it offensive if it was being used in an derisive manner, so if people started hacking crosses to pieces to protest Christianity we may get very offended by that even if we're not Christian. Otherwise, not really...and this girl isn't really disrespecting anyone or any concept with what she's doing with the hijab, so I don't see that specifically as problematic either...same with both Selena Gomez's bindi and Angelina Jolie's hijab.

I'll note though that in the Selena Gomez article, the reaction to Gomez was almost exactly the same reaction that debatability displayed here - that of religious offense. I think that offense is what most people think is inappropriate as opposed to Gomez wearing a bindi or this girl wearing a hijab. To contrast, I really doubt that most Indians would care if you mixed curry with BBQ sauce and dipped your tacos in it...I don't think anyone would tweet "#TeamCulturalAppropriationisKindOfShitty" or anything like that.

In fact that sounds rather enticing now that I think about it...LOL
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
wrichcirw
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7/11/2014 3:51:43 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Just to sum up my last comment, I think you were right to point out that cultural appropriation may or may not be a good thing, and that you can't just think it's always good. IMHO the distinguishing aspect is whether or not it's used without disparagement or derision, and if not, even if it's wildly out of context, it's not problematic.

So, a bindi in a dance routine? Sure. A hijab on a nippy morning? Sure. Calling your Korean neighbor a gook? Ok, that's where I'd draw the line in regards to where cultural appropriation can become problematic. It's all about just being civil, really.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
tulle
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7/11/2014 4:10:33 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/11/2014 3:42:52 PM, wrichcirw wrote:

Here you make another interesting point...how uncomfortable you were in a hijab. I got a similar reaction when I started growing a beard, lol...but if you stick to it, people get used to it. The cultural appropriate does eventually work. Sure, it may feel like you're fighting against the current...but that's exactly what you're doing when you fight the mainstream, right? =)

Hmm mayhaps :p

I will also note that in regards to the underlined, we do that all the time with Christianity, lol.

What I originally wrote and concluded was just essentially the same thing you were talking about was the use of the word "gook", which strictly speaking is indeed cultural appropriation - the Korean word for America is "mi gook", which well, sounds like "me gook", so "you're a gook", lol. I mean, yeah, the way it's used in American society is extremely disparaging and marginalizing...but that sounds different than what you're talking about now, which seems to be about giving cultural significance its proper due.

I've never heard of this before but that's interesting. The only time I've heard the term used was in Gran Torino and it just sounded like an insult lol

IMHO I don't think that's necessary. As long as it's not meant to disparage, then I don't think it's problematic, even if it's ridiculously out of cultural context (like say marketing Pizza Hut with American football, even though that has absolutely nothing to do with Italian pizza). It may be that my time in Asia really, REALLY desensitized me to this...I remember walking into a rather large gift shop in downtown Seoul where the most prominent display they had was a Disney marquee surrounded by hot pepper pillows (they love hot peppers there), and pillows that were...boobs of a porn star. The pillows and etc are a type of cultural appropriation I think, and I'm sure Disney would have something to say about their name being so close to cleavage...but in the end I didn't think it was disparaging...hell I thought it was hilarious.

lol what?? I can't even picture that haha

I think both are cultural appropriation and neither are problematic. I mean, the Christian cross is used everywhere in all kinds of contexts...and we don't really take issue with it at all.

Christians are not a marginalized group though and hold a lot of social power.

I'll note though that in the Selena Gomez article, the reaction to Gomez was almost exactly the same reaction that debatability displayed here - that of religious offense.

That's fair, and after a little digging I did come across this article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com...

...but then there's Miley Cyrus http://jezebel.com...

I don't think Angelina Jolie is an example of cultural appropriation but my brain is too tired to think of why lol. However, these articles might help explain:
http://racerelations.about.com...
http://everydayfeminism.com...

Sorry for all the links.
yang.
debatability
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7/11/2014 4:33:09 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/11/2014 3:51:43 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
Just to sum up my last comment, I think you were right to point out that cultural appropriation may or may not be a good thing, and that you can't just think it's always good. IMHO the distinguishing aspect is whether or not it's used without disparagement or derision, and if not, even if it's wildly out of context, it's not problematic.

So, a bindi in a dance routine? Sure. A hijab on a nippy morning? Sure. Calling your Korean neighbor a gook? Ok, that's where I'd draw the line in regards to where cultural appropriation can become problematic. It's all about just being civil, really.

I think as a Muslim, if I saw someone bashing my religion while wearing the hijab, I would be quite upset. But I think I would be more upset because my religion was being bashed, rather than because the girl was wearing a hijab.

I can also see why people would take offense to turning a religious object into a fashion trend... but in some cases I think people are being overly sensative.
ESocialBookworm
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7/11/2014 4:46:48 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I'm a Muslim.

In my opinion, I don't find it offensive. Her wearing the hijab doesn't affect me. Her anti-Islamic words might, but that's her opinion, so I can do very little about that but ignore her if I knew her.

Some people would argue though that if she wears the hijab and misbehaves or something, that she would be falsely representing Muslim girls. For instance, Rihanna had done a photoshoot in front of a mosque and was asked to leave the site, because "a mosque is a place of worship, not to pose and take pictures."
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debatability
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7/11/2014 5:30:41 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/11/2014 4:46:48 PM, ESocialBookworm wrote:
I'm a Muslim.

In my opinion, I don't find it offensive. Her wearing the hijab doesn't affect me. Her anti-Islamic words might, but that's her opinion, so I can do very little about that but ignore her if I knew her.

Some people would argue though that if she wears the hijab and misbehaves or something, that she would be falsely representing Muslim girls. For instance, Rihanna had done a photoshoot in front of a mosque and was asked to leave the site, because "a mosque is a place of worship, not to pose and take pictures."
http://www.dailymail.co.uk...

That makes sense. So it's not her wearing the hijab, rather her anti-Islamic beliefs...
ChosenWolff
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7/11/2014 5:52:54 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 7/3/2014 3:54:07 PM, debatability wrote:
Please discuss.
It's certainly rude and distasteful, especially given the fact, that most Muslims choose to wear them. There aren't any conservative fashion laws in most of the Middle East, but it is true that about 8 countries force you to wear hijabs if you're Islam. I think she needs to go there if this is some kind of movement. I know there's 10's of millions of Muslims (or more) who choose not to wear those things. In actuality, there is no rule that you have to wear them in Islam. It's a cultural thing. She's really attacking personal religious choice more than oppressive religious practices. As I said, she needs to make a difference elsewhere, and stop offending people here.

As for whether it's offensive, certainly not. Muslims don't care if you wear a hijab. When visiting Saudi Arabia, you're forced to wear a hijab. It's supposed to "suppress" sexual desire, but liberal woman wear them like scarfs simply out or respect to their culture. The hijab means "screen", and Muhammad asked men to talk to their wives from behind a screen. Obviously this is a metaphor, but not all people understand this. The actual one's from Allah Mah Li's time look like the one's from Afghanistan. People wont mind if you're wearing a hijab, but it does seem her attitude is in the wrong place. She's obviously wearing it with the intention to offend others. I would like for her to come to Dearborn, and we'll see how long she keeps that scarf on her head.

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